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Registration open daily from 8am - 6pm.  Please join us for the #ISSS2015 #Roundtable at 7.45am each morning.

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Saturday, August 1
 

09:00

PhD Programme: Systems Thinking and Practice in PhD Research - Cybersystemic Possibilities for Governing the Anthropocene
Registration is now closed and is available only for the Humboldt registered attendees.

PhD Course at ISSS2015 in co-operation with WINS at Humboldt University
30 July – 7 August 2015, Germany

A joint programme designed by ISSS and the Berlin Workshop in Institutional Analysis of Social-Ecological Systems - WINS 



  • Two days of participation in a Systemic Inquiry in Hannover (Herrenhausen) on “Governing the Anthropocene: Cybersystemic Possibilities?

  • Two days of dedicated ‘workshops’ introducing different systems approaches, methods and research traditions at Humboldt University in Berlin

  • Five days of participation in the 2015 ISSS Conference in Berlin, including a group generated presentation on the final day

  • 5 ECTS - points



Objectives


Working strategically to negotiate boundaries for research in a meaningful way in the areas of contemporary concern e.g. sustainability; development; health; farming, food, rural areas and environment/biodiversity, to name but a few, requires particular skills and abilities: It is necessary to be able to make relevant connections and to contextualize research activities without becoming overwhelmed by potential complexity and uncertainty. The context of the increasingly multifaceted complexity of issues of sustainability and climate change in relation to most contemporary issues is particularly challenging for PhD research. It is a context that is however a core part of the ISSS community’s experience. The purpose of this course is to help you, the PhD student, develop your skills in contextualizing your research, to make connections among issues using systems, cybernetic and complexity thinking and to so improve your ability to work both strategically and purposefully. The course is also designed to help you build on what other researchers have done.

 Through joining this course you can expect to:


  • gain an overview of the intellectual traditions of Cyber-systemic Thinking Approaches,

  • make links to the history of ISSS and other organized bodies concerned with cybersystemic research and scholarship,

  • strengthen your research through developing understanding of cybersystemic theories and methodologies

  • have an opportunity to reflect on strengths and weaknesses of different systems approaches and methodologies in relation to your own PhD research

  • get added value from your participation in the Herrenhausen Systemic Inquiry and the Berlin ISSS Conference by also becoming part of a parallel critical learning systems community that has a PhD research focus

  • critically review potential contributions of your research to help meet global challenges

  • develop appreciation of multiple perspectives on contemporary issues

  • work across multiple disciplines, build networks and establish new relationships supportive of your research and scholarship.


Moderators
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

President (2014-2015), International Society for the System Sciences
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing and pioneering the use of Mode-2 modalities of research practice e.g... Read More →



Saturday August 1, 2015 09:00 - 18:00
Humboldt University Campus Humboldt University Campus
 
Sunday, August 2
 

08:00

Registration
Registration is open from 8am - 6pm daily.

Sunday August 2, 2015 08:00 - 18:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
  • Host Organization ISSS

09:00

Anthropocene within the human body system – the perspective of Modern Invasive Medicine and that of Traditional Balancing Chinese Medicine
ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

Founder, Researcher, Lecturer, clinical practitioner, Ancient Balance Medicine Research Institute
SIG Chair: Health and System Thinking SIG | | Bachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in IT | Bachelor of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Master of Engineering in Telecommunication | Therapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now) | Chair of Health and Systems Thinking SIG of ISSS (2008-now) | Liasion officer of C&W region, Auxiliary Medical Service HKSAR (2006-now) | Permanent Honorary President of... Read More →

Sunday August 2, 2015 09:00 - 12:30
Wolverine Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
  • Host Organization ISSS

09:00

INCOSE: Systems Philosophy and its relevance to Systems Engineering
The Systems Engineering/INCOSE workshop on Sunday is now FULL and if you have not stated your intention to attend that workshop using the Survey Monkey questionnaire sent to you that workshop is now closed to additional participants.

We will however keep a standby list if you email: enquiryisss@gmail.com.


Systems Philosophy is the branch of the philosophy of science informed by the systems paradigm. The INCOSE Systems Science Working Group is exploring how Systems Philosophy can be used to support expansion of the theoretical foundations of Systems Engineering (SE). This workshop will present a basic introduction to Systems Philosophy, and use it to explore:





  • Perspectives on SE as a discipline and the place of SE in the systems disciplinary field;



  • How Systems Philosophy can help SE and other systems disciplines work together to develop mutually beneficial foundations;



  • How Systems Philosophy and SE can support the development of a General Systems Theory (GST), and how working with a GST can help unify and expand the theoretical foundations of SE;



  • How SEs could leverage expanded theoretical foundations to address increasing complexity of engineered systems;



  • Key programs and projects under way to improve/expand the systems sciences;



  • Emerging opportunities for richer engagement between Systems Engineering, Systems Science and Systems Philosophy.





The day will consist of seven presentations preparing the ground for four breakout sessions in which participants can explore and develop ideas and plans for strengthening SE using Systems Philosophy.

Logistics:

Lunch and tea/coffee will be provided.  Attendance will qualify for 8 PDU INCOSE credits
For more details about the upcoming workshop, please visit our workshops webpage at:

https://sites.google.com/site/syssciwg/meetings/workshop-2015-july

For more details about the “Systems Philosophy for SE” project, please visit our webpage at: https://sites.google.com/site/syssciwg/projects/o-systems-philosophy 

Moderators
avatar for Gary R. Smith

Gary R. Smith

Senior Technical Manager, Airbus Defence and Space
SIG Chair: Knowledge and Systems Sciences | | Analytical Chemist, Systems Analyst, Software Engineering, Engineering Project Management, Commercial Project Management, International Working, Process Improvement, IT, Defence and Security and Biological Systems experience. | | Specialties:Systems Engineering, Project Management

Speakers
avatar for Julie Billingham

Julie Billingham

Scientific Advisor, Centre for Systems Philosophy
Julie Billingham is Scientific Advisor to the Centre for Systems Philosophy (CSP) and an e-commerce business strategy consultant at Demandware Inc (under her married name Julie Rousseau)Her early career included 12 years modelling and simulation to support decision making, initially in the defence industry, subsequently in the environmental sciences and later in a range of enterprise spatial contexts. Having co-founded an online library... Read More →
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →




Sunday August 2, 2015 09:00 - 17:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:00

PhD Programme: Systems Thinking and Practice in PhD Research - Cybersystemic Possibilities for Governing the Anthropocene
Registration is now closed and is available only for the Humboldt registered attendees.

PhD Course at ISSS2015 in co-operation with WINS at Humboldt University
30 July – 7 August 2015, Germany

A joint programme designed by ISSS and the Berlin Workshop in Institutional Analysis of Social-Ecological Systems - WINS 



  • Two days of participation in a Systemic Inquiry in Hannover (Herrenhausen) on “Governing the Anthropocene: Cybersystemic Possibilities?

  • Two days of dedicated ‘workshops’ introducing different systems approaches, methods and research traditions at Humboldt University in Berlin

  • Five days of participation in the 2015 ISSS Conference in Berlin, including a group generated presentation on the final day

  • 5 ECTS - points



Objectives

Working strategically to negotiate boundaries for research in a meaningful way in the areas of contemporary concern e.g. sustainability; development; health; farming, food, rural areas and environment/biodiversity, to name but a few, requires particular skills and abilities: It is necessary to be able to make relevant connections and to contextualize research activities without becoming overwhelmed by potential complexity and uncertainty. The context of the increasingly multifaceted complexity of issues of sustainability and climate change in relation to most contemporary issues is particularly challenging for PhD research. It is a context that is however a core part of the ISSS community’s experience. The purpose of this course is to help you, the PhD student, develop your skills in contextualizing your research, to make connections among issues using systems, cybernetic and complexity thinking and to so improve your ability to work both strategically and purposefully. The course is also designed to help you build on what other researchers have done.

 Through joining this course you can expect to:


  • gain an overview of the intellectual traditions of Cyber-systemic Thinking Approaches,

  • make links to the history of ISSS and other organized bodies concerned with cybersystemic research and scholarship,

  • strengthen your research through developing understanding of cybersystemic theories and methodologies

  • have an opportunity to reflect on strengths and weaknesses of different systems approaches and methodologies in relation to your own PhD research

  • get added value from your participation in the Herrenhausen Systemic Inquiry and the Berlin ISSS Conference by also becoming part of a parallel critical learning systems community that has a PhD research focus

  • critically review potential contributions of your research to help meet global challenges

  • develop appreciation of multiple perspectives on contemporary issues

  • work across multiple disciplines, build networks and establish new relationships supportive of your research and scholarship.




Moderators
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

President (2014-2015), International Society for the System Sciences
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing and pioneering the use of Mode-2 modalities of research practice e.g... Read More →



Sunday August 2, 2015 09:00 - 18:00
Humboldt University Campus Humboldt University Campus

14:00

From System Basics to Anthropocene – the perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine and of the teaching of Buddha.
ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

Founder, Researcher, Lecturer, clinical practitioner, Ancient Balance Medicine Research Institute
SIG Chair: Health and System Thinking SIG | | Bachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in IT | Bachelor of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Master of Engineering in Telecommunication | Therapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now) | Chair of Health and Systems Thinking SIG of ISSS (2008-now) | Liasion officer of C&W region, Auxiliary Medical Service HKSAR (2006-now) | Permanent Honorary President of... Read More →

Sunday August 2, 2015 14:00 - 18:00
Wolverine Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
  • Host Organization ISSS

14:00

Workshop: Education for Anthropocene Governance
Lead by Prof. Pavel Luksha, Director, Global Education Futures

Pre-conference workshop and SIG working session at the ISSS 2015 Conference, Berlin, Germany





  • Part 1: August 2, 2015 from 14:00 to 18:00



  • Part 2: August 6, 2015 from 16:00 to 18:00





Held in partnership between ISSS Curating Emergence for Thrivability SIG and Global Education Futures

Introduction

It has been argued that the era of the Anthropocene calls for entirely new civilizational strategies. We must depart from behavioral strategies that take root in the time even before the emergence of modern civilization and lead to overconsumption of natural resources, destruction of biodiversity, disruption of climatic balance, and increasing chances of self-destruction of our species. The challenge we face requires multi-faceted responses that includes





  • development of entirely new technologies (e.g. sustainable renewable energy, energy-efficient construction, efficient recycling, materials that come from renewable sources, etc.);



  • policies that encourage individual & collective behavior that reduces, not increases, existential risks for our civilization, as well as negative human impact upon Nature – and cultural patterns that do the same;



  • organizations and institutions that work directly with some of the Anthropocene challenges on the local, national, and global scale – e.g. preventing the loss of biodiversity or reducing greenhouse gas emissions.





However, it is also often argued that the crisis we have to overcome in the age of the Anthropocene is caused primarily by the faulty models of thinking and acting that are permeating our society. The key to sustainable and prosperous society lies with education – the skills of children and adults. Some governments (e.g. in Scandinavian countries) have successfully addressed some of the Anthropocene problems by introducing new kindergarten, school & university level programs regarding ‘greener’ behavior of their populations. However, the level of response still does not match the level and the urgency of threats that we as humanity have already created for ourselves and Nature. We need to identify general and professional skills that would help us deal with the challenges of the Anthropocene on a planetary level – and we have to make global effort to have these skills introduced in the standard educational curricula of developed and emerging societies.

Purpose and structure of the workshop

The workshop on “Skills for Anthropocene Governance” is organized as a small Systems Lab where the collective intelligence of participants will be applied to map out and prioritize existing and future civilizational challenges that need to be addressed in the age of the Anthropocene. We will then map out general and specific skills that can be used to govern the Anthropocene. Finally, we will identify changes required in the institutions of conventional and new education (including schools, universities, global online learning platforms, skills-related social movements, etc.) that are required to install and reproduce these skills on the global scale – and possible policies and arrangements that can accelerate the transformation of education in this direction.

The workshop is the result of a partnership between the ISSS Curating Emergence for Thrivability Special Integration Group (the CET SIG) and Global Education Futures. It will be conducted as a series of participatory dialogues using widely and lesser known formats such as World Café and Rapid Foresight. Participants are asked to co-create, discuss, and share – rather than to only listen and ask.

Part 1 of the workshop will be held as a pre-conference event on Sunday, August 2, 2015, from 2pm until 6pm. During this session, the main content for discussion will be co-created by the participant group, including mapping of existing & future challenges, identifying skills for systemic thriving in the Anthropocene, and developing recommendations for education systems and policy makers. We will also establish ‘systemic challenge’ questions that may impede realization of these ideas – and we will address these systemic challenges during Part 2 of our workshop. The workshop will be open and free to all attendees.

Part 2 of the workshop will be held during the ISSS conference on Thursday, August 6, from 4pm until 6pm (and will also be taken up in the running evening workshops). This part will be the Curating Emergence for Thrivability portion of the meeting, and will be open for attendance independently of Part 1 (i.e., participation in Part 2 does not require prior participation in Part 1 of the workshop). During this session, we will re-capitulate the results from the Part 1, and will jointly address the ‘systemic challenges’ that our earlier work identified. We also anticipate generating ideas for actionable initiatives that can be explored and enacted after the end of the workshop.

Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Pavel Luksha

Pavel Luksha

Professor, pavel.luksha@gmail.com
Dr. Pavel Luksha said the following about Kinematic Self­Replicating Machines The book provides a relatively good review on theory of self­reproduction. I found the book a very comprehensive study on possible designs of kinematic self­replicators. One thing the book has successfully shown is that these designs, at least those theoretical, are vast. The book is without a doubt a compendium of projects for artificial... Read More →




Sunday August 2, 2015 14:00 - 18:00
Pine 2 Hotel Scandic Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin

14:00

Workshop: Evolutionary Learning Laboratories (ELL)
Separate registration required on Conference registration system.
Participants should bring their own computer to the workshop to fully participate in the ELL session.

Speakers
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder ofThink2Impact Pty Ltd and in Australia. Dr Nguyen was a co-founder of the internationally linked Systems Design and Complexity Management (SDCM) Alliance at The... Read More →



Sunday August 2, 2015 14:00 - 18:00
Pine 1 Hotel Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin
  • Host Organization ISSS

18:00

Welcome Reception
Conference Welcome Reception, Scandic Hotel with Conference Co-Hosts Ray Ison & Louis Klein

18:00 Welcome -- Ray Ison and Louis Klein
18:10 Connecting at the Conference -- Delia MacNamara
18:20 The Scandic Hotel and Sustainability -- Jörn Schiel
18:35 Connections and Conversations -- Delia MacNamara, Michaela Thoma, Louis Klein and Jonas Kocevar

 

Moderators
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

President (2014-2015), International Society for the System Sciences
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing and pioneering the use of Mode-2 modalities of research practice e.g... Read More →
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Conference Organisers
avatar for Jonas Kocevar

Jonas Kocevar

Fellow, Systemic Excellence Group
Jonas Kocevar is Fellow at the Systemic Excellence Group - an independent Think Tank for Leading Practice. In his work, Jonas is combining his experience in corporate strategy and systemic personnel development with an interest for interdisciplinary organisational research. Jonas Kocevar studied sociology and business administration at the University of Marburg and Rijksuniversiteit Groningen.
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Vice-President Memberships and Public Relations, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | SIG: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science | | "Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in 2006, and were granted Foundation Award status by the University of Hull soon after. Her consultancy clients include the University of Hull, Hull City Council, NHS, East Riding Business... Read More →
avatar for Michaela Thoma

Michaela Thoma

Consortial Partner, Systemic Excellence Group
Michaela Thoma is a change expert and project manager. She provides support and advice in processes of organisational change. | | Michaela is a sociologist, with a main focus on sociology of organisations. During her studies of sociology, information and communications technology and media consulting she worked as a researcher exploring practices of project management in organisations, and the transformation of the IT industry. After her... Read More →


Sunday August 2, 2015 18:00 - 20:30
Scandic Bar Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
 
Monday, August 3
 

07:45

RoundTable Discussion
Everyone is invited to the daily reflection RoundTable. We will meet every morning for an hour before the plenaries, Monday through Friday. Join us every day, or whenever you like.

Our RoundTable purposes are to open a space for daily reflection on our ideals, what we want to learn and create; to increase time for each of us to talk from about what we are thinking and learning now; and to be listened to by others, enjoying and learning with each other in a new way.

 Our format is:


  • We spend 5 minutes listening to short readings.

  • We then spend 50 minutes on individual reflections or learning reports, time distributed equally among all present (e.g. 26 people = about 2 minutes each).


 Our suggested topics for the first morning will be:


  1. "Linking this year’s theme, Governing the Anthropocene, to your specific field of expertise, what do you see as our greatest challenges and hopes?”   AND/OR

  2. "What situations and projects did you leave behind to come here, and what could happen here that would be valuable to you in your work and life back home?”



Each day, a different topic will be suggested by a different volunteering facilitator in attendance.

Folk wisdom and compelling research indicate that participants experience surprising benefits from this activity after about four sessions. Our own experience with this format has resulted in the following theory: Just as we break the sound barrier when we travel faster than the speed of sound, we break the communication barrier when we hear 25 authentic viewpoints in 50 minutes.

Looking forward to experiencing this with you all.

Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Monday August 3, 2015 07:45 - 08:45
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

08:00

Registration
Registration is open from 8am - 6pm daily.

Monday August 3, 2015 08:00 - 18:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
  • Host Organization ISSS

09:00

Welcome and Housekeeping
Welcome by Vice-President Conferences, Louis Klein.
Housekeeping with Vice-President Administration, Jannifer Wilby
Introducing the Conference Team.
Introduction to sched.org and overview of pilot with BlueJeans provided by Platinum Sponsor, College of Exploration (representative Peter Tuddenham). 

Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Conference Organisers
avatar for Jonas Kocevar

Jonas Kocevar

Fellow, Systemic Excellence Group
Jonas Kocevar is Fellow at the Systemic Excellence Group - an independent Think Tank for Leading Practice. In his work, Jonas is combining his experience in corporate strategy and systemic personnel development with an interest for interdisciplinary organisational research. Jonas Kocevar studied sociology and business administration at the University of Marburg and Rijksuniversiteit Groningen.
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Vice-President Memberships and Public Relations, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | SIG: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science | | "Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in 2006, and were granted Foundation Award status by the University of Hull soon after. Her consultancy clients include the University of Hull, Hull City Council, NHS, East Riding Business... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →



Monday August 3, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:30

Keynote: Prof. Andy Stirling - Emancipating Transformations: From Anthropocene Control to Culturing Systems
Current global environmental governance reverberates with talk of a new 'Anthropocene epoch' defined by 'human domination', in which a 'perfect storm' of catastrophic threats is seen to force a singular 'great transition' towards 'Earth systems management'. The advent of this new discourse raises particular questions for how systems-based understandings can best inform policy making.

A key theme in this new governance movement, is the emphasis on ‘control’. Under a growing mood of 'environmental authoritarianism', humanity is conceived “as a self conscious control force that has conquered the planet” and with a destiny to “take control of Nature’s realm”. And it is Earth systems theories that are relied upon to help take charge of the 'control variables of the Earth'.

But what these moves also reflect, are the longstanding priorities attached by powerful incumbent interests to exactly these kinds of rhetorics of control. Indeed, democracy itself presents an early target. Increasingly portrayed as a 'failure', a 'luxury', or even 'an enemy of Nature', leading figures argue for democracy to be 'put on hold'. With systems approaches apparently leaving no room for argument, there seems ‘no alternative’ but compliance – or irrational denial and existential doom.

Yet there are alternative ways to address the gravity of current ecological and social imperatives. It can be recognised, for instance, that democratic struggle is the principal means by which knowledges and practices of Sustainability were shaped in the first place. In this view, concentrated power and fallacies of control are more problems than solutions. Here, history shows the greatest ongoing forms of transformative progress (like release from colonialism, racism or patriarchy), to owe more to plural knowledges and values and unruly hope-inspired agonistic contention, than to single orderly technical 'transitions' based on deterministic notions of systems science or fear-driven structured control.

Like other great progressive struggles of history, radical shifts in grassroots culture and anarchically choreographed flocking behaviours in nature, the most effective modes for radical change often lie in spontaneous bottom-up collective action. These do not depend on rigidly disciplined ‘integrated science’ and monolithically-structured ‘planetary management’. So, relations between human systems and natural systems are defined more by co-evolutionary processes of mutual culturing than control. It is in helping to understand, highlight and explore these contrasting modalities of distributed social and ecological coordination that enlightened forms of systems theory may offer special contributions.
 

Speakers
avatar for Andy Stirling

Andy Stirling

Professor of Science & Technology Policy, SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, The Sussex Energy Group, School of Business, Management and Economics
Growing up around southwest England and in Singapore in the 60s and 70s, Andy Stirling’s undergraduate studies at Edinburgh started out in astronomy, then shifted thro' 'science studies' to a masters in archaeology and social anthropology. He then worked as a field archaeologist and ecology and peace activist in the 80's, going on to co-ordinate the nuclear, disarmament and energy campaigns for Greenpeace International, then later serving... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 09:30 - 10:15
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

10:30

Tea/Coffee
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Monday August 3, 2015 10:30 - 11:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:00

Keynote: Prof. Ray Ison, Presidential Address - Governing in the Anthropocene: what future systems thinking in practice?
The Presidential Address will be given by ISSS President Prof. Ray Ison
Professor of Systems, Applied Systems Thinking in Practice (ASTiP) Program, Engineering & Innovation Department, Faculty of Mathematics, Computing and Technology, The Open University

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

President (2014-2015), International Society for the System Sciences
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing and pioneering the use of Mode-2 modalities of research practice e.g... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 11:00 - 11:45
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:45

Keynote: Prof. Martin Bunch - Ecosystem Approaches: Navigating Complexity, Promoting Health
Speakers
avatar for Martin Bunch

Martin Bunch

Professor, York University
Martin Bunch is a human geographer by training, and currently holds the position of Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies (FES), York University.  Martin is interested in the transdisciplinary application of ecosystem approaches and complexity science to environmental problems - problems which are associated with high levels of complexity and uncertainty, and in which decision stakes are high. Currently Martin is exploring adaptive... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 11:45 - 12:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

12:30

Lunch
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Monday August 3, 2015 12:30 - 13:30
Scandic Restaurant 3rd Floor Hotel Scandic Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin

13:30

A Call to Action for the Systems Sciences Community

The world’s systems scientists are crucial knowledge holders in this anthropocene era.  This paper will put forth a deep call to action to the systems community.  It is vital in this time that members of this community put themselves on more influential platforms, speaking in more audible ways, and with a congruent voice.  The message must be about what this community can see about the degradation of the living organism that is our earth, and what must happen in order to enable its survival.

This paper frames the systems community as keepers of vital wisdom about the macro effects of how the earth has been altered by humans.  We will argue that such macro-level understanding must be joined with regional and local level meaning-making processes already underway across the globe, and it must inform those initiatives.  As important, micro-level activities must have more ways to inform and influence macro level perspectives on how human activity is responding to the imperatives of the anthropocene.  We will argue that this call to action is a call to develop fields of attraction – visible, plausible alternatives to the human behaviours that, in aggregate, jeopardize the likelihood that our future can be one wherein we can thrive.  We propose there must be attractors with a wide variety of design paths, presented as narratives that invite and entice participation. 

We will examine obstacles that members of the systems community face in taking up a call to action like this, along with ways to meet those obstacles, clearing the path to greater participation by systems experts in rising to the realities of life in the anthropocene age.

 

2439

CORPORATE LEVEL MANAGERIAL KNOWLEDGE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM

Luz Maria Rivas

lrivasm@eafit.edu.co

Managing a single business demands knowing about how to create and sustain its competitive advantage. Managing multibusiness firms additionally requires coordinating business diversity and capturing synergies that increases managerial complexity. Those challenges demand a different kind of knowledge. Based on a qualitative research, this paper presents a conceptual model of this knowledge as a complex adaptive system (CAS).  As a CAS, multilevel agents, synergy stimulus, adaptive responses and action systems compose this knowledge. Corporate level managerial knowledge characterizes as tacit, collective, integrative and collaborative. The research used a case study approach in a Colombian multibusiness firm, focusing on the top management team. The resulting approach helps to enhance the conception of corporate level managerial knowledge and this approach facilitates decision-making decentralization.

Keywords: Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), Multibusiness Firm, Managerial Knowledge, Corporate Strategy

 


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Irma Wilson

Irma Wilson

Founder, FutureSharp
Business unusual strategist, edge inhabiter and provocateur. | “Design thinking is core to how humanity innovate. And find it, we must. We’re talking species survival here, the Earth will be fine.” | Irma Wilson is a Collective Intelligence Strategist and Futurist who keeps a finger on the Social Innovation pulse.  She investigates the ways in which imagination and individual agency can be activated to create engaged global... Read More →
avatar for Pamela Buckle-Henning

Pamela Buckle-Henning

Assistant Professor, Management, Marketing & Decision Sciences, Adelphi University
Secretary and Vice President for Protocol, International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Pamela Buckle Henning She is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work.Pamela’s scholarly... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

A Viable System Model of Political Parties

Political parties exist in western democracies as a means of reducing variety by formalizing factions and allowing for a more manageable choice for voters. I will be using the system in the United States as an example although comparisons with parliamentary systems will be noted at times.

Political parties are nested hierarchies that proceed from the national committee level down through the state and county/municipality. The rules that govern them range from the formal, such as the rules established by the Federal Election Commission to the informal and sometimes quirky such as the “we don’t want nobody that nobody sent”. Party discipline is far broader and far looser in the United States than it is in a parliamentary system.  Voters usually indicate a party preference when they register to vote although about a third of the electorate now counts itself as ‘independent’.  Depending on the state, independents may or may not be restricted to voting in the general election.  Joining a political party is as easy as checking a box.  In contrast, in parliamentary systems, a minority of voters join a party by paying a subscription fee which allows them to attend the party caucus that nominates candidates for that party.  Party discipline is much stricter in the parliamentary system where the leader and his or her advisors determine the position on a vote and an office holder who votes against the position can be expelled from the party unless the special circumstance of the free vote is in force. In the United States, all votes are free votes. Party discipline is enforced by the party whip but the means used is persuasion, augmented by arm-twisting, horse trading and the occasional threat.

The activities of the five systems of the VSM are not evenly distributed throughout the recursion levels.  For example, the party platform does appear in System Five, but aspects may be ignored or repudiated by individual candidates often without heavy consequences. Most System Four activities are concentrated on winning the next election, although shorter and longer term planning is done and issues are debated for possible inclusion in the platform or for legislative or judicial initiatives. Public relations and strategy also appear here. Systems Three and Three Star adjust resources among activities depending on election cycle calendar and other priorities with System Two coordinating whatever is applicable at the particular recursion level.  System One activities include, again depending on the election cycle calendar, voter registration, candidate training, and fund raising.  All may involve incumbent officeholders and candidates although the particular campaigns are separate organizations.

The VSM analysis will show some strengths and weaknesses of the present system and some possibilities for coordination with like-minded issue groups. 


Moderators
AL

Allenna Leonard

Principal, Complementary Set, allenna_leonard@yahoo.com
SIG Chair: Viable System Modelling

Monday August 3, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Balancing Individualism and Collectivism in an Australian Aboriginal Context

Epochs have occurred throughout the history of the earth. A move from one epoch to the next can be considered to occur when there is a major transition which has a geological impact on all of life. A transition from the Holocene to the Anthropocene is now considered to have occurred in about the year 1800 with the Industrial Revolution. Dramatic changes to global conditions have occurred in a little over 200 years since then, with the consequent impact on the environment and all living things. Along with a geological change, a cultural transition has occurred. An individualistically oriented style of thinking has come to prominence with an objectification and exploitation of the environment. Yet, amongst Indigenous cultures, this change has not taken place. They retain a collectivist style of thinking and behavior and a deep respect for the land and all it contains. One of the values we can gain as participants in the Anthropocene is a recognition of these different types of knowledge existing in cohabitation, a comfortableness with an individualistic and relational identity occurring alongside each other. How much more valuable for this epoch to become an inclusive era when the collectivist perspectives from Indigenous cultures are appreciated alongside individualistic perspectives of developed nations?

Keywords: Anthropocene, individualism, collectivism, Aboriginal, Indigenous, cultural transition 


Moderators
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.

Speakers
KM

Keith Miller

Senior Lecturer, Flinders University
ISSS Regular


Monday August 3, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Collective Intelligence, Connective Intelligence, and Social Systems of Syntony

Collective Intelligence is the grail of social systems science.  It is key to harnessing the neural power of the human intellect in order to augment human problem-solving capability in ways that are commensurate with the levels of complexity and entanglement of today's wicked problems and VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous) environments. And beyond that, collective intelligence holds the promise of an emergent level of consciousness, one that arises at the level of the collective and validates the ontological integrity of expression of wholeness of collective being. The former aspect of collective intelligence, known as weak CI, is more concerned with the measurable aspects of IQ in social systems while the latter, known as strong CI, is more concerned with the manifestation of qualities of sentience, though both focus at trans-personal and meta-organismic systemic frames. This paper explores the relationship between the performance criteria of collective intelligence and the systemic state of collective intelligent being.  In doing so, it posits that a precursor for any form of collective intelligence is what can be called connective intelligence, that is, the ability to identify and establish feedback links with relevant and leveragable information sources and enablers in ones environment, be they other human beings, networks, or specific technologies of information processing and communication.  By effectively, efficiently and efficaciously creating linkages that enable and empower collective problem solving and decision taking, connective intelligence creates the operational platform or substrate upon which collective intelligence is brought into play. However, connective intelligence is not a guarantee of collective intelligence for it is quite possible for a rich ecosystem of connective intelligence to be constructed but either only passively engaged or underutilized by the social system(s) that access it. In order for high levels of synergy among the component parts of a given socio-technical system to be realized, a pre-condition of conscious, intentional and purposeful will to seek and create meaning interdependently must also be present.  This collusion or "con-spiration" for the joint creation of meaning is a hallmark of social systems of syntony wherein aligning and tuning with emerging patterns of meaning making is considered an essential characteristic of collective engagement.  Interestingly enough, while the condition of syntony is essential to the establishment of connective intelligence that serves life affirming, future creating and opportunity increasing expressions of collective intelligence, it is just such collective intelligence that, in turn, fosters higher level social systems of syntony capable of manifesting both weak CI and strong CI. 

Keywords:  Collective intelligence, connective intelligence, syntony, synergy, social systems design.

 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →



Monday August 3, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Discharging Complex Patients from an Acute Hospital for Interim Assessment Placements in South Gloucestershire, UK

If this is the Anthropocene era life can be understood as being primarily shaped by human intelligent design.  And if the early part of this era is characterised by destructive exploitation of the earth and its peoples by those with the power so to do, the ‘Upper Anthropocene’ perhaps offers the prospect of using power with rather than over, as a force for purposeful shaping of human society for the benefit of communities and the environment in a global perspective.

Guided by this philosophy and in the belief that collaborative action research can be applied to construct lasting improvements to human systems even at a small scale, our paper will describe our engagement as facilitators and co-researchers in a collaborative venture to improve one aspect of the health care of older people with complex health needs in South Gloucestershire in the UK.

The context of our work can be summed up as follows: a growing, ageing population; a monolithic National Health Service (NHS) with services free at the point of delivery; severe fiscal constraints; a sense of perpetual crisis as the dominant focus of management attention; little or no headroom at executive top level to re-imagine and re-engineer health services in communities; the NHS portrayed as a political battleground under constant media scrutiny; a dilemma at local level whether to manage within existing rules and systems designed nationally or to try to innovate, at least at the margins, to configure better services for patients and better system cost effectiveness.

Working as consultants and interim managers this paper will explore in case study format the insider/outsider perspectives of enabling complex patients often with multiple co-morbidities, to be assessed out of hospital for onward post-acute health care. These patients are often delayed from being discharged even after being declared medically able to leave owing to a number of factors. The result is that beds are ‘blocked’ further upstream at admissions, with serious consequences for admitting patients in need of an acute bed. This is an

Our story in particular concerns the process of reducing this problem through designing and enabling a system for discharging patients to an interim placement, thus enabling a faster turnover and availability of beds in the hospital and providing a better environment within which patients can recuperate and be assessed for eligibility for onward support.

We describe the emergent nature of getting to the starting line, taking the first steps to introduce a local change process that the various partners can agree on and support, in a context of risk aversion, financial restraint and a monolithic, highly politicised National Health Service (NHS). This stage is about building a shared understanding of the territory and building confidence to co-innovate

We then describe how alternative models were built and assessed, calibrated by an in-depth analysis of patient records which described typical patient journeys. 

Finally we show how working participatively we developed feasible models that not only offered patient benefits (although these remain unvalued in fiscal terms), but also resource savings by shifting the locus for patient assessment out of hospital and into interim placements, largely in care homes, and by generating savings through bringing in self-funder resources into the system earlier.

The health system are now in delivery phase having adopted one of the models we constructed and being monitored to facilitate further systemic learning.

 


Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
PJ

Paul James Pettigrew

Director, Waite Atkins Ltd.
ISSS Two Day
YC

Yvonne Christine Le Brun

Director, Waite Atkins Ltd.
ISSS Two Day


Monday August 3, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Mind Mapping Systems Thinkers’ Attitudes Facing a Sepsis Problem
Moderators
avatar for Gary R. Smith

Gary R. Smith

Senior Technical Manager, Airbus Defence and Space
SIG Chair: Knowledge and Systems Sciences | | Analytical Chemist, Systems Analyst, Software Engineering, Engineering Project Management, Commercial Project Management, International Working, Process Improvement, IT, Defence and Security and Biological Systems experience. | | Specialties:Systems Engineering, Project Management

Presenter / Artist
BD

Brigitte Daniel-Allegro

SE and Systems Thinking Consultant, Brigitte Daniel-Allegro
Invited Speaker



Monday August 3, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

A Cyber-Systemic Approach to Explore a Viable Organization for an Electric Vehicle System
Moderators
AL

Allenna Leonard

Principal, Complementary Set, allenna_leonard@yahoo.com
SIG Chair: Viable System Modelling

Speakers
Presenter / Artist
PI

Prof. Isaias Jose Isaias Badillo-PIña

Professor, IPN-ESIME-Z
Didactic introduction to Systems Science
PR

Prof. Ricardo Tejeida-Padilla

Professor, IPN
ISSS Dev


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

A Systemic View of the Value of Environmental Conservation: the Case of Bono Takyiman, Ghana
Moderators
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Consciousness and the PAR Practitioner: Lessons from Peri-Urban Mexico
Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
PW

Patricia Wilson

Professor, patriciawilson@utexas.edu
Participatory action research | Contemplative pedagogy for emergence | Community development | Latin America, Mexico | Leadership for resilient systems


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Systemic Consulting - Practices
Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Gabriele Harrer

Gabriele Harrer

Head Malik Competence Center Vester, Malik Management St.Gallen AG
Gabriele Harrer was long years project manager and scientific assistant to Prof. Frederic Vester, Member of the Club of Rome, in his "Studygroup for Biology and Environment, Munich.  She worked closely with Vester in his workshops, big system studies and projects and his books and exhibitions about Interconnected Systems & Systems Thinking. She contributed to the development of Vester’s computerized system modeling tools... Read More →


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

The Purpose of Change Is Problem Solving
Moderators
avatar for Gary R. Smith

Gary R. Smith

Senior Technical Manager, Airbus Defence and Space
SIG Chair: Knowledge and Systems Sciences | | Analytical Chemist, Systems Analyst, Software Engineering, Engineering Project Management, Commercial Project Management, International Working, Process Improvement, IT, Defence and Security and Biological Systems experience. | | Specialties:Systems Engineering, Project Management

Presenter / Artist
JK

Janos Korn

ISSS Retired


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Wiener's Paradox – We Can Dissolve it Together
Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →

Speakers
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Dino Karabeg

Dino Karabeg

dino@ifi.uio.no
Global issues such as the climate change, or the 'world problematique' as the Club of Rome called them, call for new ways of thinking and acting. Results in physics and cognitive science challenge the foundations on which the academic tradition has developed. Information technology allows us to organize the production and distribution of knowledge in completely new ways. In these circumstances a new academic frontier opens up, where we are called... Read More →
avatar for Sasha Mile Rudan

Sasha Mile Rudan

PhD Student, University Of Oslo
mprinc@gmail.com | | Designing Collaboration across disciplines: www.CollaboScience.com | Designing Sustainable socio-technical systems | Engaged Art: Designing creative dialogue between Science and Art: www.CollaboArte.com


Monday August 3, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Developing Causal Loop Diagrams for Coffee Supply Chain: Supporting to Enhance Competitive Advantages of a Vietnamese Coffee Product
Moderators
AL

Allenna Leonard

Principal, Complementary Set, allenna_leonard@yahoo.com
SIG Chair: Viable System Modelling

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder ofThink2Impact Pty Ltd and in Australia. Dr Nguyen was a co-founder of the internationally linked Systems Design and Complexity Management (SDCM) Alliance at The... Read More →
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →
TV

Thich Van Nguyen

Student, The University of Adelaide
ISSS Student


Monday August 3, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Emergent Purposes in the Networks Internationalization Generate the International System
Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
AP

Ass. Prof. Andrea Moretta Tartaglione

Assistant Professor, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio
ISSS One Day


Monday August 3, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Foregrounding Critical Systemic and Indigenous Ways of Collective Knowing Towards (Re)Directing the Anthropocene
Moderators
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.


Monday August 3, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Grounded Action Research: Systems Thinking Approach to Promoting CSR in Kazakhstan
Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
AB

Azhar Baisakalova

KIMEP University
ISSS One Day


Monday August 3, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Knowledge Transfer as a Rational Choice: A Decision Theoretic Characterization
Moderators
avatar for Gary R. Smith

Gary R. Smith

Senior Technical Manager, Airbus Defence and Space
SIG Chair: Knowledge and Systems Sciences | | Analytical Chemist, Systems Analyst, Software Engineering, Engineering Project Management, Commercial Project Management, International Working, Process Improvement, IT, Defence and Security and Biological Systems experience. | | Specialties:Systems Engineering, Project Management

Presenter / Artist
YS

Yasuo Sasaki

ISSS Regular


Monday August 3, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Open
Monday August 3, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Contributing to Sustainability through Translation in Governing the Anthropocene
Moderators
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Intangibles and Valuation in the Age of Knowledge
Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Let's Begin Systems Methodologies again from the Definition of System
Moderators
avatar for Gary R. Smith

Gary R. Smith

Senior Technical Manager, Airbus Defence and Space
SIG Chair: Knowledge and Systems Sciences | | Analytical Chemist, Systems Analyst, Software Engineering, Engineering Project Management, Commercial Project Management, International Working, Process Improvement, IT, Defence and Security and Biological Systems experience. | | Specialties:Systems Engineering, Project Management

Presenter / Artist
PT

Prof. Taketoshi Yoshida

Professor, JAIST
ISSS Regular


Monday August 3, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Monday August 3, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Monday August 3, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Understanding the Management of the Chinese Bank from Systemic Perspectives
Moderators
AL

Allenna Leonard

Principal, Complementary Set, allenna_leonard@yahoo.com
SIG Chair: Viable System Modelling

Presenter / Artist
AP

Ass. Prof. Jae Eon Yu

Assistant Professor, Keimyung University
ISSS Dev


Monday August 3, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:30

Tea/Coffee break and Poster Viewing
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Monday August 3, 2015 15:30 - 16:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Anthropocene? Yes, but Stratified: Measuring Existing Societies with Civilization Level Index
Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Approach for a Cybernetic Management System for the Development of a Viable Disaster Management System for the State of Hawaii
Moderators
avatar for Prof. Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Gerhard Chroust

Professor, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Cultural and Human Aspects of Engineering, Research in Disater Managment, History, Archaeology, | being Secretary General of the IFSR,

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Ecological Footprint and Governing the Anthropocene through Balancing Individualism and Collectivism
Moderators
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.

ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →

Monday August 3, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Emergence of Quantitative Living Systems Science
ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for James Simms

James Simms

Retired, jrsimms@juno.com
SIG Chair:    Living Systems Analysis

Monday August 3, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Handling and Measuring the Complexity of an Engineering System Using HiGraph-Based Model
Moderators
avatar for Janet Singer

Janet Singer

Liaison to INCOSE, jwillissinger@measures.org
Janet Singer is a leader in joint efforts by ISSS and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ‘co-mature’ systems science and systems engineering as disciplines that share a common systems thinking and systems appreciation core. She is a second-generation member of ISSS. Her father, Roger F. Willis, was a mathematician who headed the first systems research group at Stanford Research Institute. For the past three... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
HA

Hycham Aboutaleb

Research Engineer, ENSTA ParisTech


Monday August 3, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

The Limits of Bioenergy: A Complex Systems Approach to Land Use Dynamics and Constraints
Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Self-governance and symbiosis: a systemic approach to Socio Ecological Systems resilience

Several approaches understand resilience as a systemic attribute that emerges in the relationship between the system and its niche or environment; it is distinguished by an observer as a system’s capability to persist or to maintain its intern change dynamics in consideration with (in some cases, despite of) environmental change dynamics. Described this way, resilience is an attribute related with viability, which implies considering aspects such as adaptability and transformability. Throughout this document we argue that it may be desirable to take into account a more holistic and complex way to approach resilience in Socio Ecological Systems – SES. Looking for a deep understanding of change dynamics in SES and what it may be a desirable change path for human societies, the paper  introduces the symbiotic metaphor as a way to describe and understand complex relationships between human and ecological systems. We also argue that this approach brings up useful implications for self-organisation at various levels of systemic aggregation in human systems. Along the document we build a statement for changing resilience and governance analysis in terms of intern and environmental change dynamics, in such a way that change and self-organisation considerations are structured around relationship dynamics. The paper concludes showing how this approach has been useful for understanding change dynamics of two different SES in the Colombian Andean Eco Region and discusses the implications we may draw for future research. 


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
AM

Angela Maria Espinosa

Reader, Hull University Business School
ISSS Two Day



Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Combining System Dynamics Modeling with other Methods: A Systematic Review
Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Speakers

Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Disaster-Management: Challenges for Computer-Supported Process and Project Management
Moderators
Speakers
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Prof. Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Gerhard Chroust

Professor, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Cultural and Human Aspects of Engineering, Research in Disater Managment, History, Archaeology, | being Secretary General of the IFSR,


Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Four Layers Approach for Developing a Tool for Assessing Systems Thinking
Moderators
avatar for Janet Singer

Janet Singer

Liaison to INCOSE, jwillissinger@measures.org
Janet Singer is a leader in joint efforts by ISSS and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ‘co-mature’ systems science and systems engineering as disciplines that share a common systems thinking and systems appreciation core. She is a second-generation member of ISSS. Her father, Roger F. Willis, was a mathematician who headed the first systems research group at Stanford Research Institute. For the past three... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Moti Frank

Moti Frank

Vice President for Academic Affairs, HIT-Holon Institute of Technology
Systems Thinking | Systems Engineering | Engineering Systems Thinking
SK

Sigal Koral Kordova

Faculty Member, HIT
ISSS Regular


Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Reprogramming Anthropocene – Crowd-sourced Governance of Trans-Technical Systems
Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Sasha Mile Rudan

Sasha Mile Rudan

PhD Student, University Of Oslo
mprinc@gmail.com | | Designing Collaboration across disciplines: www.CollaboScience.com | Designing Sustainable socio-technical systems | Engaged Art: Designing creative dialogue between Science and Art: www.CollaboArte.com


Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Risks, Crisis and the European Law: Implications and Parallels for Addressing Financial, Energy Security and Environmental Catastrophe
Moderators
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.

Speakers
Presenter / Artist
JK

Juliane Katherine Mendelsohn

Researcher, Freie Universität Berlin
ASC Student One Day (Wednesday)


Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Living Systems Science Workshop and Discussion Group
ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for James Simms

James Simms

Retired, jrsimms@juno.com
SIG Chair:    Living Systems Analysis

Monday August 3, 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Analytical Framework for a Systemic Analysis of Drivers and Dynamics of Historical Land-Use Changes: A Shift Towards Systems Thinking
Moderators
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Claudia Stephanie Coral

Claudia Stephanie Coral

PhD Candidate, Humboldt University of Berlin
ISSS Student, I am a PhD student at humboldt University , Faculty of Agricultural Economics. My topic of research is: land-use dynamics and drivers of change in Ecuador , a shift towards systems thinking.


Monday August 3, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Open
Moderators
Monday August 3, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Open
Monday August 3, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Open
Monday August 3, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Synthesizing Systemic Intervention Approaches: Combining Viable System Model, Knowledge Management, and Toyota Production System for a Sustainable Holistic Management Model
Moderators
avatar for Janet Singer

Janet Singer

Liaison to INCOSE, jwillissinger@measures.org
Janet Singer is a leader in joint efforts by ISSS and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ‘co-mature’ systems science and systems engineering as disciplines that share a common systems thinking and systems appreciation core. She is a second-generation member of ISSS. Her father, Roger F. Willis, was a mathematician who headed the first systems research group at Stanford Research Institute. For the past three... Read More →

Speakers
Presenter / Artist
BM

Bradley Moore

ISSS Two Day
avatar for Javier Calvo

Javier Calvo

Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University
Critical Systems Thinking theory and systems approaches for Systems Engineering and Engineering Management; change management.


Monday August 3, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Open
Monday August 3, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Open
Moderators
Monday August 3, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Open
Monday August 3, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

The Anthropocene Problem As an Axiological Desequilibrium
Moderators
avatar for Assoc. Prof.  Janet McIntyre

Assoc. Prof. Janet McIntyre

Assistant Professor, Flinders University
SIG Chair:    Balancing Individualism and CollectivismJanet McIntyre-Mills is Associate Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University  of Indonesia. Her praxis as a sociologist /social anthropologist spans over 30 years as an academic, teacher, researcher and community development specialist.McIntyre is on the editorial boards of the following journals: Systemic Practice and Action Research... Read More →
avatar for Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Norma Ruth Arlene Romm

Professor, Adult Education, University of South Africa
I am interested in how research activity (including professional and other research activity) impacts on the construction of our worlds ; and I am keen to reflect upon how researchers can take into account the potential impact of research activities.

Presenter / Artist
FP

Francisco Parra-Luna

Retired Professor
ISSS Retired


Monday August 3, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Workability and Mobility of Construction Machinery: Systematic Approach to Engineering Matters
Moderators
avatar for Janet Singer

Janet Singer

Liaison to INCOSE, jwillissinger@measures.org
Janet Singer is a leader in joint efforts by ISSS and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ‘co-mature’ systems science and systems engineering as disciplines that share a common systems thinking and systems appreciation core. She is a second-generation member of ISSS. Her father, Roger F. Willis, was a mathematician who headed the first systems research group at Stanford Research Institute. For the past three... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
TT

Tatsumasa Takaku

ISSS Two Day


Monday August 3, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

18:00

ISSS Board Meeting (Board Members)
Everyone is invited to the daily reflection RoundTable. We will meet every morning for an hour before the plenaries, Monday through Friday. Join us every day, or whenever you like.

Our RoundTable purposes are to open a space for daily reflection on our ideals, what we want to learn and create; to increase time for each of us to talk from about what we are thinking and learning now; and to be listened to by others, enjoying and learning with each other in a new way.

 Our format is:





  • We spend 5 minutes listening to short readings.



  • We then spend 50 minutes on individual reflections or learning reports, time distributed equally among all present (e.g. 26 people = about 2 minutes each).





 Our suggested topics for the first morning will be:



  1. "Linking this year’s theme, Governing the Anthropocene, to your specific field of expertise, what do you see as our greatest challenges and hopes?”   AND/OR



  2. "What situations and projects did you leave behind to come here, and what could happen here that would be valuable to you in your work and life back home?”




Each day, a different topic will be suggested by a different volunteering facilitator in attendance.

Folk wisdom and compelling research indicate that participants experience surprising benefits from this activity after about four sessions. Our own experience with this format has resulted in the following theory: Just as we break the sound barrier when we travel faster than the speed of sound, we break the communication barrier when we hear 25 authentic viewpoints in 50 minutes.

Looking forward to experiencing this with you all.

Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Monday August 3, 2015 18:00 - 19:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

19:30

Pub Discussion: Relational Science
Moderators
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

Monday August 3, 2015 19:30 - 21:00
Scandic Bar Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

07:45

ISSS Roundable Discussion
Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 07:45 - 08:45
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

08:00

Registration
Registration is open from 8am - 6pm daily.

Tuesday August 4, 2015 08:00 - 18:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
  • Host Organization ISSS

08:45

Welcome and Housekeeping
Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 08:45 - 09:00
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:00

Keynote: Prof. Mary Catherine Bateson - Causality and Responsibility
Speakers
avatar for Prof. Mary Catherine Bateson

Prof. Mary Catherine Bateson

Writer, Cultural Anthropologist
"We are not what we know but what we are willing to learn.” | Mary Catherine Bateson is a writer and cultural anthropologist living in the Monadnock region of New Hampshire with frequent visits to Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has written and co-authored many books and articles, lectures across the country and abroad, and has taught at Harvard, Northeastern University, Amherst College, Spelman College and abroad in the Philippines and in... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author. | | I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College High Schools for low-income youth in Dayton, Ohio. | | I host a monthly event called Visual Thinkers Show and Tell that meets at OCAD University in... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 09:45
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:45

Panel: Systemic Evaluation: A Panel Presentation and Discussion
The panellists will draw on a mixture of theoretical insight and rich practical experience in using systems thinking and complexity ideas for progressing mainstream programme and policy evaluations. The discussion will centre on what helps and hinders systemic evaluation; that is, developmental evaluation where value judgements properly inform the design (ex-ante/ formative) as well as the effects (ex-poste/ summative) of any intervention. The challenges of systemic evaluation are explored from the perspective of different practitioners including policy advisors, policy decision makers, project/programme managers, and commissioners of evaluations.

Moderators
avatar for Martin Reynolds

Martin Reynolds

Senior Lecturer, Systems Thinking in Practice, The Open University
ISSS Regular

Speakers
avatar for Emily Gates

Emily Gates

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Emily is an I-STEM graduate research assistant currently working on several program evaluations: the NSF-funded Entrepreneurial Leadership in STEM Teaching and Learning (EnLiST) program; the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Coal Education Program; and the Global Institute for Secondary Educators, a Study of the U.S. Institutes for Scholars program funded by the U.S. Department of State.  She is in her final... Read More →
avatar for Richard Hummelbrunner

Richard Hummelbrunner

Senior Associate, OEAR Regionalberatung
In the past Richard Hummelbrunner has worked extensively as practitioner and advisor in the field of regional policy at various levels (local, national, EU, international development).During recent years Richard’s interest has shifted to evaluation, and has gained extensive experience on programme evaluation, lead several major evaluation assignments and been involved in training / capacity building activities for monitoring and evaluation... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Mita Marra

Prof. Mita Marra

Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration, University of Salerno
Mita Marra is currently the President of the Italian Evaluation Association (2013). She is tenured Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration at the University of Salerno and Senior Researcher at Italian National Research Council in Naples since 2000. She has been Visiting Scholar at the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration of the George Washington University (2010 - Washington DC) and at the... Read More →
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:45 - 10:45
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

10:45

Tea/Coffee
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:15

Panel: Chair Stefan Blachfellner, VP IFSR - Are we ready to leverage the present future of systems research? Personal reflections and institutional perspectives on current opportunities and constraints in the field
Lead by the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR) Vice Presidents: Stefan Blachfellner, Mary Edson, Nam Nguyen

Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mary Edson

Mary Edson

President, maredson.s3@gmail.com
Mary Edson is President of the International Federation for Systems Research.  As a Scholar/Practitioner whose major interests are in Complex Adaptive Social Systems, she teaches courses in Executive Leadership, Strategic Project Management, and Talent Management including Diversity and Inclusion. Through experiential learning and development of organizational leadership competencies, her students apply systems thinking to improve business... Read More →
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder ofThink2Impact Pty Ltd and in Australia. Dr Nguyen was a co-founder of the internationally linked Systems Design and Complexity Management (SDCM) Alliance at The... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 11:15 - 11:45
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:45

Keynote: Dr David Rousseau - Manifesto for General Systems Transdisciplinarity
Manifesto for General Systems Transdisciplinarity (GSTD)

Dr David Rousseau, Centre for Systems Philosophy, UK

Dr Jennifer Wilby, Centre for Systems Studies, University of Hull, UK

Julie Billingham, Centre for Systems Philosophy, UK

Stefan Blachfellner, Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of the Systems Sciences, Austria

The ISSS was founded on an ambition to develop a systems transdiscipline, grounded in a General System Theory (GST), which could be leveraged to build a systemically healthy world that promotes personal dignity, human welfare, international cooperation and environmental stewardship.  The ISSS pioneers saw this as an urgently needed response to looming human, social and environmental crises, which at least in part coincide with what we recognise today as the Anthropocene. This ambition and call to action remain as inspiring and pertinent today as they were when the ISSS was founded in 1956 as theSociety for the Advancement of General Systems Theory.  The crises anticipated by our founders are now upon us, making the founders’ vision and call to action more pertinent than ever.

Over the last two years ISSS members David Rousseau, Jennifer Wilby, Julie Billingham and Stefan Blachfellner have been investigating the possibility of accelerating progress towards a General Systems Transdiscipline (GSTD). This was done by working with:





  • contributors to the ISSS’s SIG on Systems Philosophy and SIG on Research towards a General Theory of Systems in 2013 and 2014,



  • participants in a special Symposium of the 2014 European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR),



  • participants in a special 2014 Conversation of the International Federation of Systems Research (IFSR), and



  • attendees of a 2015 Workshop of the Systems Science Working Group (SysSciWG) of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE).





Based on these investigations, we believe that the issues that have in the past hindered the development of a GSTD are no longer significant, and new opportunities have arisen such that rapid progress with the development of a GSTD is now a practical possibility.

In this presentation David Rousseau will present our Manifesto for General Systems Transdisciplinarity, in which we outline our perspective on why the development of a GSTD is still an urgent need for our times, why it is a viable prospect to develop one now, what we see as the key to opening the route to developing a GSTD, what a GSTD would look like, what it would take to develop such a transdiscipline, how it would unlock our potential to build a flourishing future society, and (most importantly) our call to action for:





  • the ISSS to renew its commitments to its founding ambitions, and



  • ISSS members to actively engage in the new phase of work towards developing, establishing and leveraging a General Systems Transdiscipline.





We will announce the establishment of a broad-based community program of work towards fulfilling our manifesto objectives, and give details of how ISSS members can participate in this programme. 

Tuesday August 4, 2015 11:45 - 12:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

12:30

Lunch
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Tuesday August 4, 2015 12:30 - 13:30
Scandic Restaurant 3rd Floor Hotel Scandic Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin

13:30

Examining the Promise of Systems Thinking to Transform Evaluation Practice

Government agencies, foundations, and international development organizations seek to evaluate the consequences of policies and programs (i.e. social interventions) they fund. Evaluation practitioners who conduct these evaluations typically use methods based on linear models of social interventions and straightforward cause-effect thinking to examine whether interventions achieve their intended consequences. However, these approaches often fail to capture unintended and unpredictable consequences of interventions because they are not suited to addressing uncertain, complex, and non-linear social change. In the last ten years, the evaluation field has begun turning to systems thinking for alternative ways of understanding social interventions and change. While there are significant efforts to import systems thinking to other fields including public health, international aid and development, organizational management, and human services there has been little research on the value of systems thinking for evaluation practice. Translating insights from the systems thinking literature into the language and tasks of evaluation practice holds considerable promise for improving the latter undertaking.

This paper is a critical, analytical review of the interdisciplinary literature on systems thinking in relation to the evaluation of social interventions. The review discovers how systems thinking: (1) is conceptualized in the evaluation literature and (2) contributes to and challenges current assumptions that evaluation practitioners use to frame the task of evaluating social interventions. Journal articles, working papers, briefs, and conference proceedings published between 1988 and 2015 within select intervention-driven fields – public health, international aid and development, organizational management, education, and human services—were analyzed using categories based on a widely accepted, foundational framework of evaluation practice. Drawing on this literature, I argue that systems thinking compels intervention fields and agencies to re-frame the model of social problem solving that guides their work from predict-act-evaluate to adaptive management. For evaluation practice to be relevant and useful in an adaptive management model, it must transform its core assumptions regarding social interventions and context, methods, values, knowledge, and use. I contend that the promise of systems thinking lies in its potential to transform these assumptions and identify significant ways this transformation has begun unfolding in this literature.


Moderators
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Gates

Emily Gates

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Emily is an I-STEM graduate research assistant currently working on several program evaluations: the NSF-funded Entrepreneurial Leadership in STEM Teaching and Learning (EnLiST) program; the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Coal Education Program; and the Global Institute for Secondary Educators, a Study of the U.S. Institutes for Scholars program funded by the U.S. Department of State.  She is in her final... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Living Systems-Inspired Innovation

Biomimicry is an emerging transdisciplinary genre — a living systems-inspired approach to innovations. The Biomimicry Framework and Practice offer theory and application for innovating form, process, or system with nature as a model, mentor, and measure. The framework is composed of three essential elements: a) a practice of (re)connecting with nature, b) the Biomimicry Thinking Design Process for emulating strategies various organisms use for surviving and thriving, and c) the Biomimicry ethos which has a strict sustainability mandate embedded and is wrapped around 26 life principles (deep patterns in nature) that need to be met in order for a design to be considered a biomimetic innovation. At the core of the practice is the belief that life always creates conditions for life, and that human systems must be designed to do the same if we are to continue to thrive as a species on this planet.

In this paper, both the framework and the practice are introduced in order to draw attention to the interrelationship of system thinking, design thinking, and biology in this innovation approach. Secondly, this paper will be focused on potential application for leadership development. While Biomimics have mastered the design process when it comes to mimicking forms (product design) and processes (technology-driven innovation), and even complex business systems, what might perhaps come online now is the application of Biomimicry to the evolution of self & community. What does it mean to create conditions for life in one’s own life and to co-create these conditions with one’s local community so that co-evolution is the result? What models in nature exist from which people can learn? What are, for instance, the secrets of the precious interrelationships in ecosystems, such as the collective intelligence of coral reefs or mangroves, that cause these systems to co-evolve from the bottom up and thrive through self-organization? What is the delicate balance between the ecosystem relationships that keeps the system optimized? How might we expose and apply these secrets to the human world, in particular, to the development of self in community with others?

Keywords: Biomimicry, living systems, innovation, system thinking, design thinking, nature’s genius, ecosystem intelligence, co-evolution, collective intelligence.

To learn more about the Biomimicry Framework, the four-phased Biomimicry Thinking Design Process, and the creative engagement methodologies used for innovation, please visit: http://www.reginarowland.com/bio-innovation/ and thumb through the subpages on scoping, discovering, creating, and evaluating.


Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

P2P in the Anthropocene with the Convergence Gathering as a Case Study

Victor MacGill

There are many threats as we move deeper into the anthropocene age. The dominance based hierarchies that have become an unquestioned part of 21st century life are a reflection of the linear profit driven paradigm that fails to see the interconnectedness between us, and between us and the world we inhabit.  In order to find a pathway out of the looming dystopic futures that appear to be unfolding, a new paradigm that recognises the connectedness within nature and the social world is necessary to generate new social structures that can lead to more sustainable, thriving futures.

One weak signal on the horizon that might foreshadow a change in paradigm towards a more healthy way of seeing the world and interacting in it is the peer to peer movement. The peer to peer movement creates ways for people to interact without intervening controlling hierarchies that build value for those involved. There are a number of forms from digitally based platforms like Wikipedia, Linux, couch surfing and ride sharing through to the Arab Spring and occupy Wall Street. There are also links to the co-operative movement and community initiatives like transition towns and permacultural living.

A case study is presented examining one type of peer to peer group in more detail to reveal practical issues of operating within this new paradigm. The Convergence gathering is a group of people interested in alternative lifestyles that has met for five or six days over the New Year in North Canterbury, New Zealand for almost thirty years. It has developed an organisational style with no ongoing structured leadership.

 


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Socially Responsible, Sustainable Development (Systemic Doubts)
Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Socially Responsible, Sustainable Development (Systemic Doubts)
Presenter / Artist
RB

Ricardo Barrera

Professor, rbarrera@rbya.com.ar
ISSS Dev


Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Three Constructs of Systems Thinking for Better Governing a Globalized World in the Anthropocene

Living in a globalized society implies that political thinking necessarily extends beyond the national level to reach us in our roles as citizens of the world. Living in today’s globalized society also requires a new level of political thinking commensurate with the complexity of its challenges. To overcome the many difficulties we, and the planet we live on, face in the Anthropocene era, it has become incumbent on human beings to practice systems thinking. This paper will examine how general systemic thinking, critical systems thinking, and whole healing systems thinking can help us both comprehend and overcome these challenges.

Keywords: Global citizen, cosmopolitanism, globalization, Anthropocene, Earth System, systems theory


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Life Itself: A Relational Theory

Background: Robert Rosen claimed that the existence of life can be explained in terms of closed causal relations. This is quite a different approach from explaining life in terms of behavior alone. It defines life in terms of the way a system is "organized" across all levels of causation. In his book "Life Itself" Rosen described a minimum "organization" of relations between natural causes that could be called alive. His study of life followed along two lines of reasoning: (1) that causal organization can be described in Mathematics prior to quantification (using Category Theory), and (2) that all living systems involve "Modeling Relations" that are "anticipatory".  He did not integrate these two tracks in his work, but left that to his followers. He did, however, give many hints on how to do it, one being his diagram of a "Metabolism-Repair (M-R) System," another his diagram of a modeling relation. He explained that such systems cannot exist within the mathematical restrictions we adopted to describe a strictly mechanistic world (the Modernist view). There is a great deal we can learn from this initial work, and following Rosen's leads we can also move forward with developing a relational theory applicable to any system. We will examine the initial steps in doing that, as thoroughly as possible in 4 hours.

Workshop Agenda:

This workshop will be based on examining the four cause relational entailment structure outlined in Robert Rosen’s work in Category Theory entailments and Modeling Relations – that is, linking entailment with relation to form a meta-model of a ‘whole’ system that may also have the fundamental properties of life. We will go through the foundations of this idea and recent developments that seem very promising for articulating a theory of whole systems. The approach not only realizes Rosen’s concepts, but also the initial insight of Arthur Koestler working with Ludvig von Bertalanffy, into a new theoretical object that he called the “Holon”.

The Workshop will be conducted mainly as an interactive tutorial. Since there is a lot of difficult material to cover, there will not be time for a contributed paper stream. We may be able to integrate short, highly relevant contributions from participants by prior arrangement.

Hour One:  Definitions and Philosophical World View

In this section we will explore the fundamentally different perspectives of traditional science and relational science. We will see how ‘ontology’  (how we imagine nature to be) determines ‘epistemology’ (what we can learn about it); and how ‘crises’ arise when learning challenges those basic assumptions, leading to advances science to new paradigms. We will trace the key discoveries that shook up the modernist/positivist worldview and the surprising source of inspiration from our own ancient past that led to our post-modern view of physics. We will then see how that transition was ‘just enough’ for physics but not enough for biology, and we will examine how, by capturing more of the deep causality view, we can create a  new analytical method for understanding whole systems in terms of whole systems, using relational mathematics. We will thus discover the “relational holon”.

Hour Two:  Relational Frameworks

Armed with a basic ability to step into the relational universe, we will, in this section, examine mathematical constructions and deconstructions that derive from the relational holon, and how this view can provide a framework for conducting systems research. We will also compare this framework to many other research frameworks that are in surprising agreement but nevertheless remain isolated in different disciplines, despite their profound collective implication of a general pattern in nature.

Hour Three:  Methods and techniques

In this section we will introduce and discuss methods for applying relational analysis to problems, giving examples, and allowing participants to analyze a case of their own choosing. We will collectively explore methods and discuss their further development in various technical domains. We will also consider implications of the framework for coupling research models and establishing a new kind of informatics architecture.

Hour Four:  Case Studies

In the final section we will discuss results of our own case study attempts and compare them with other prepared examples. We will end with an open discussion of the utility of relational modeling and directions for future development, including its potential linkage to other approaches and contribution to the goal of finding a General System Theory.

It is highly recommended that workshop participants explore the following references prior to the workshop, and come equipped with relevant questions and/or insights:

Baianu, I.C. (2006) Robert Rosen’s Work and Complex Systems Biology. Axiomathes, 16, 25–34.

Checkland, P. (1988) The case for “holon.” Systemic Practice and Action Research, 1, 235–238.

Cilliers, P., Biggs, H.C., Blignaut, S., Choles, A.G., Hofmeyr, J.-H.S., Jewitt, G.P. & Roux, D.J. (2013) Complexity, modeling, and natural resource management. Ecology and Society, 18, 1.

Cornish-Bowden, A. (2006) Putting the Systems Back into Systems Biology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 49, 475–489.

Cornish-Bowden, A. (2015) Tibor Gánti and Robert Rosen: contrasting approaches to the same problem. Journal of theoretical biology.

Cornish-Bowden, A. & Cárdenas, M.L. (2008) Self-organization at the origin of life. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 252, 411–418.

Cornish-Bowden, A. & Cárdenas, M.L. (2005) Systems biology may work when we learn to understand the parts in terms of the whole. Biochem.Soc.Trans., 33, 516–519.

Edmonds, B. (2007) The Practical Modelling of Context-Dependent Causal Processes – A Recasting of Robert Rosen’s Thought. Chemistry & Biodiversity, 4, 2386–2395.

Edwards, M.G. (2005) The integral holon: A holonomic approach to organisational change and transformation. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 18, 269–288.

Hoffmeyer, J. (1997) Biosemiotics: Towards a new synthesis in biology. European Journal for Semiotic Studies, 9, 355–376.

Hoffmeyer, J. (2001) Life and reference. Biosystems, 60, 123–130.

Hofmeyr, J.-H.S. (2011) Relational humanism. The Humanist Imperative in South Africa, 181.

Hofmeyr, J.-H.S. (2007) The biochemical factory that autonomously fabricates itself: a systems biological view of the living cell. A: Boogerd, F. C, 217–242.

Kineman, J.J. (2011) Relational Science: A Synthesis. Axiomathes, 21, 393–437.

Kineman, J.J. (2012a) R-Theory: A Synthesis of Robert Rosen’s Relational Complexity. Systems Research and Behavioral Science, 29, 527–538.

Kineman, J.J. (2012b) The Ontology of Anticipation. Anticipatory systems: philosophical, mathematical, and methodological foundations IFSR international series on systems science and engineering., Springer, New York.

Kineman, J.J. & Poli, R. (2014) Ecological Literacy Leadership: Into the Mind of Nature. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, 95, 30–58.

Koestler, A. (1969) Beyond atomism and holism: the concept of the holon. Beyond reductionism, 192–232.

Louie, A.H. & Poli, R. (2011) The spread of hierarchical cycles. International Journal of General Systems, 40, 237–261.

Luz Cárdenas, M., Letelier, J.-C., Gutierrez, C., Cornish-Bowden, A. & Soto-Andrade, J. (2010) Closure to efficient causation, computability and artificial life. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 263, 79–92.

Miller, R., Poli, R. & Rossel, P. (2013) The Discipline of Anticipation: Exploring Key Issues, UNESCO, Paris.

Nadin, M. (2010) Anticipation and dynamics: Rosen’s anticipation in the perspective of time. International Journal of General Systems, 39, 3–33.

Poli, R. (2010a) An introduction to the ontology of anticipation. Futures, 42, 769–776.

Poli, R. (2009) The complexity of anticipation. Balkan Journal of Philosophy, 19–29.

Poli, R. (2010b) The Complexity of Self-reference. A Critical Evaluation of Luhmann’s Theory of Social Systems.

Rosen, R. (2012) Anticipatory systems: philosophical, mathematical, and methodological foundations, 2nd ed. Springer, New York.

Rosen, R. (1993a) Drawing the Boundary Between Subject and Object: Comments on the Mind-Brain Problem. Theoretical Medicine, 14, 89–100.

Rosen, R. (1999) Essays on Life Itself, Columbia University Press, New York, NY.

Rosen, R. (1991) Life itself: a comprehensive inquiry into the nature, origin, and fabrication of life, Columbia University Press.

Rosen, R. (1993b) On models and modeling. Applied Mathematics and Computation, 56, 359–372.

Rosen, R. (1994) On Psychomimesis. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 171, 87–92.

Rosen, R. (1990) The Modeling Relation and natural law. Mathematics and Science, pp. 183–199. World Scientific Publishing.

 


Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 15:30
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Biodiversity 0.2 – a Smart Invertebrate or Computing the Wild Life City in the Anthropocene

The paper presents one part of the series and research project ‘Socio-Ecological Systems: advancing tools, language, and architecture for designing the gestaltung of systems’, with emphasis on the Anthropocene, human habitat and urban ecologies. The subject complements ‘Architectural Ecologies – code, culture and technology at the convergence’ (EMCSR 2014), concepts of material and social behavior based on structural organization as decision-making parameters for urban design strategies in the cyborgian city (IS4IS 2015) and a critical vision of the hacked body, equipped with super-smart bio-digital material triggering a fundamental change of its role as humanoid cyborg in a conversing environment (Digital Bauhaus Summit 2015).

 “Biodiversity 0.2 – a smart invertebrate or computing the wild life city in the Anthropocene” suggests design principles for creating a future habitat for all species, including organic, human, animal and computational devices. The latter describing a rather novel and advancing typology.

The concept of biodiversity has emerged strongly during the hippiesque and technophil 1970s, featuring the birth of the Urban Ecology movement, the era of the ‘Whole Earth Catalogue’ (1968) hand in hand with Buckminster Fuller’s ‘Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth’ (1969) and the beginning of extra-terrestrial travel where punch-cards described the interface for a new, a digital human condition (Apollo 11). Biodiversity furthered itself globally with its political advent in November 1988, when the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) convened the Ad Hoc Working Group of Experts on Biological Diversity followed by the CBD (UN Convention on Biological Diversity) entering into force into December 1993.

At that stage the Anthropocene had been in full bloom; Government policies and regulations, educational strategies and infrastructural development have echoed and followed suit by addressing urban environments through implementing gardens and advancing bicycle paths in the city, prohibiting vehicles that emit polluting substances and generally fostering wild life in the city. And while decision-making bodies still focused on their exclusive and separate fields of expertise, developments in information and communication technology advanced to an interdisciplinary extend, breeding big data that has become too big to house or handle, creating the Internet of things that requires structuring and cultivating a culture in which participative design and open source information have become as usual as conversations between humans and machines.

The paper suggests that biodiversity can and must go further than the mere implementation of discrete spaces fostering nature in urban environments or the monitoring of natural habitat using digital devices, but a full integration into the material world. Natural organisms own an enormous amount of intelligence that we as humans have not yet understood. Principles suggested include an emergent information and living ecology based on biological performance merged with man-made technologies while keeping an eye on a bio-intelligent socio-ecological system design. The aim is to design systems where biological performance, bio-intelligence and an information network society can complement each others and understand the collaboration systemically, rather than individual and discrete.   


Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Forming Networked Social and Labor Relations in a Network Economy

tmedvedeva@mail.ru

The emergence of new social and labor relations in a time of globalization and network economy is a difficult and ambiguous phenomenon, and therefore many researchers have expressed serious concern about the fate of labor and social and labor relations. Globalization and computerization of the economy, the rapid dissemination of knowledge and the formation of universal interdependence have led to the possibility that while capital-based industries diffuse  worldwide, labor is less mobile. Many studies describe the deteriorating situation of workers, the atomization of individuals, individualization of labor, and the erosion of social capital. Workers' organizations, established in an era of an industrial economy, are destroyed or weakened. This violates the principle of equality of opportunity of all key players in social and labor relations to represent and protect their interests.

How does the emergence of a new economy alter the social dialogue between labor and capital? Are we seeing the end of a collective consciousness among workers, amid more individualistic behavior?  The participants in social and labor relations are now in conditions where they are forced to learn the principles of network organization and in this way have the opportunity and responsibility to protect their interests in the new economy. This article explores how the forming of a network economy influences social and labor relations.  It identifies the organizational foundations and principles of social and labor relations in the emerging new economy.  It reviews the influence of culture on how networked social and labor relations are formed using Russia as an example. It considers ways to solve problems in the field of social and labor relations on both organizational and theoretical levels.

Keywords: social and labor relations; economic globalization; network economy; dialogue between labor and capital; an extended system approach.

 


Moderators
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other.

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Harnessing IHRD Trainers' Integral Capacities for Problem Resolving and Possibility Emergence: The Case Study of an Integral Action Learning Program Designed in World Café 2.0

In the past decade, claim for unleashing organizational capacities no longer  focuses on explicating the nature of problem structures and the way problems being framed. More and more emphasis is placed on uncovering the levels of organizational consciousness or cultivation of organizational spirit. While applying systems archetypes to depict the structural patterns underlying most organizational problems, organizational leaders and HRD trainers might be led to problem-focus or outcome-focus, instead of emergence-focus, from which possibilities and opportunities might arise. They tend to neglect the fact that what prohibits most organizational development or social transformation is not the problems themselves, but how we, the stakeholders of the whole society, relate to one another and the problems. Through a deeper understanding of the complexity of problem would help clarify how problems could be transformed into possibilities. Furthermore, clarifying our roles in the making of problems and how our mentalities shape these roles would help uncover the causes of these problems.

Adam Kahane, who is a gifted facilitator specializing in cross-sector dialogue and scenario building, proclaims three types of increasing complexity as the root of organizations’ and societies’ toughest problems. They are dynamic complexity, social complexity and generative complexity, which could be observed in profit, non-profit, and most governmental organizations. Once we could not see the relationship between cause and effect of any of our decision, we would lose insight into such “dynamic complexity” and feel powerless, helpless or hopeless when the problems keep emerge and distance in time and space still block our relating cause to effect. He contends that “social complexity” often emerges in an organization of diverse stakeholders with different agendas and worldviews. Especially in the globalizing society when multiplicity is highly embraced and divergence advocated, conflicting differences could be either disguised under the value of plurality or resolved with superficial dialogues. Most important of all, when we face the emergent realities wherein solutions from the past no longer fit, we will be seeing realities with old, existing mental frames and locked in “ generative complexity”.

However, how could people with different mentalities, visions and paradigmic thinking work together to facing the various types of thorny problems? When power struggle is disguised in democracy, how could the government engage divergent stakeholders to listen to each other? How could the government identify the numerous constellations of minds and souls in the public?

In this presentation, the author suggest that one of the most critical approaches to bridge the gap between government effectiveness and public needs is to create a new dialogical platform, allowing a new language for communication and negotiation. Indeed, there are many approaches to harnessing such an enabling langue for collaborative inquiries for intercultural or cross-organizational learning, such as appreciative inquiry, open space, future search, whole scale change and world café. Instead of taking any of these forms, the author integrates the Chinese Golden Circle Philosophy, Theory U, and Integral Theory to design an integral form of collective thinking and dialogue, coined as the World Café 2.0. The World Café 2.0 is designed to harness the IHRD trainers’ systems thinking and integral capacities to transform problems into possibilities or searching opportunities inherent in these problems. To achieve this, the author will juxtapose problems and possibilities in cross-cultural and cross-organizational contexts and design a holistic model for integral action learning to bridge gap between government and public. Below are the strategies of such a holistic design model:

Enabling the deep questioning abilities through U Journey

Resolving value conflicts through both Chinese and Western Golden Circle

Uncovering the world views inherent in collective thinking and action

Engaging in holistic design through collaborative inquiry with integral spirit

The author will demonstrate how such a holistic model could be applied to foster creative dialogue and envisioning action in the context of divergent contexts. Indeed, the unique challenge of today is to articulate such an underlying integrative culture, and enact its cultivation for global creativity and prominence.

Although we may not know well how such an integrative culture might actually develop and work in the long run, it seems clear that a deep integrative model must emerge, at least in part, from synthesizing across diverse wisdom traditions-west and east, north and south, indigenous and contemporary. For example, more and more cross-cultural and cross-civilization dialogues are occurring in different fields. Synthesizing different cultural traditions characterizes the works of more and more renowned artists, scholars, writers, scientists and creative managers in multinational enterprises.

Keywords: Integral Theory, Theory U, Action Learning, Collective Dialogue, World Café 2.0


Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →

Speakers
ML

MingFen Li

ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Sense-Making between and across Stakeholder Perspectives

The CX Tool© provides a visual tool for creating congruence between what is known and what is done within a socio-technical system. It guides the analyst by identifying six elements contained within organizational intelligence and performance management dimensions. Three elements define within Organizational Intelligence: Essential Ideas; Essential Processes, Protocols, Structures; and Essential Assessments/Audits. Three elements define Performance Management: Essential Actions; Essential Standards; and Essential Deliverables. The CX Tool© allows analysts to assign congruency scores between elements horizontally and vertically while allowing comparisons between current and desired state of the system. Yet, the CX Tool© does not distinguish between stakeholders’ perspectives, a feature that, when faced with complex and/or complicated systems, may prove critical. In this research the authors propose a conceptual framework to incorporate different stakeholders’ perspectives into the CX Tool©. A short case study is presented to illustrate how different stakeholders’ perspectives can be incorporated and quantified.

Keywords: CX tool, pluralism, sense-making, system congruence


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Systemic Approach to Examine the Relationship Between Structure, Conduct and Performance Model of Agriculture in Africa, Evidence from Ghana
Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Choosing Boundaries for Interventions in Open Dynamic Systems

It is no easy task for a planner to choose a boundary for intervening in an open and dynamic system. As the system is continuously reshaped through complex interactions with its surroundings, the planner cannot be certain that any chosen boundary will continue to be relevant or appropriate into the future. Since Churchman first emphasized the importance of boundary judgments, many systems theorists and practitioners have urged planners to recognise the subjectivity and plurality of boundary definitions. Accordingly, the planner’s boundary must accommodate diverse views and values that are also changing. The planner thus faces the question: what kind of intervention would enable improvement for all, while also remaining relevant and flexible under changing conditions?

This presentation summarizes findings from my PhD study, which explores the planner’s challenge through a case study—the improvement of river health in the Murray-Darling Basin in South East Australia. Water management within the Murray-Darling Basin is embroiled in the tension between a highly variable climate, the historical development of a productive agricultural economy, and the progressive degradation of riverine ecosystems. Within this context, the planner seeks to improve ‘river health’, which is conceived as a balance between competing uses of water. Applying Ulrich’s critical system heuristics to unfold boundary judgements in policy documents, scientific studies, and those of planners and stakeholders with diverse interests, I found that: there is no single definition of ‘river health’ that is likely to be achievable or acceptable to all; and there is no single boundary that is the most appropriate choice for improving river health. Interventions that seek to increase control by defining tight boundaries around river health, ironically increase their own vulnerability to failure.

Inspired by the work of Francine Hughes and colleagues in river restoration, and Emery Roe’s analysis of the debate on sustainable development, I propose that interventions in open dynamic systems are more likely to be effective if they are based on open boundaries. In other words, interventions must embrace open-ended goals; and be designed and managed on a case-by-case basis, according to local circumstances. But then, is there an appetite for open-ended approaches that consider improvement as a journey with NO destination, and planning as ‘inside-out’, rather than top-down or bottom-up?


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Speakers
SK

Saideepa Kumar

PhD Student
ISSS Student


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Community Self-Organisation; How to Make it more Effective?

Communities are parts of larger social contexts that may inhibit or support their satisfactory self-organisation. Members of a community share to different degrees common interests, such as housing services, sports facilities, good quality environment or indeed myriad of other concerns. For all these interest they need to organise themselves to achieve collectively what individually they are unable to achieve.

Community agents constitute these situations. Shared interests trigger communications among them and between them and public, third sectors and private services. Agents form networks and the focus of this contribution is on the characteristics and quality of their relations. The evolution of these relations is by and large the outcome of self-organisation; it is not difficult to understand that their complexity makes it is difficult if not impossible to plan them. They need enabling, and support. Agents can enable their self-organisation through their own resources and creativity or through the support of external agents, such researchers, NGOs, government agencies, private trusts, philanthropy or others forms of support. Accepting that self-organisation is inherent to the complexity of social processes, the challenge for us is to work out how to make these self-organising processes more effective. How can citizens of a community improve the quality of their own interactions? How can these citizens co-create desirable values in their interactions with external enablers, such as organisation and policy-makers? 

For instance, the impact of a policy in a community may be skewed in the benefit of those citizens that are better prepared articulate their needs. Better education and competencies make them more visible an influential to Government agencies, which require organised citizens in order to direct their resources and achieve better policy performance. Resources are more likely to be directed towards the citizens with more self-organising capabilities, at the expense of those with fewer competencies. In these circumstances local self-organisation may be precisely in the detriment of those in more need (Espejo and Mendiwelso-Bendek, 2011).  Well intentioned policies may end up increasing operational imbalances within the community to the detriment of justice and fairness. In practice this requires that additionally to implementing services such as education, health, housing and so forth, it is necessary to consider policies enabling balanced self-organisation in the community, aiming at community members with similar participatory strengths regardless of their history, race or gender.  It is necessary redressing imbalances in communities’ self-organisation. This approach may improve not only self-organisation within the community but also the quality of this community’s relations with those organisations creating, regulating and producing policies relevant to them. In summary it is necessary to improve self-organisation processes within community groups at the same time of improving the community’s influence in value co-creation with relevant external agents. The latter imply self-organising process that often highlights imbalances in power relations (Mayo, Mendiwelso-Bendek and Packham, 2013, p237-8). However, in this contribution our main focus is on exploring aspects of self-organisation within communities to highlight strategies to overcome imbalances in participatory processes.  

References

Espejo, R, Mendiwelso-Bendek, Z. (2011) An argument for active citizenship and organisational transparency, in Kybernetes Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 477-493

Mayo M, Mendiwelso-Bendek Z and Packham C (2013) Eds and authors. Community Research as Community Development, Palgrave ISBN-13: 978-1137034731


Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Environmental Mindfulness Enacted in the Green Silk Road Initiative

Prime Maison Fujimidai 410 1-25 Fujimidai Chikusa-ku Nagoya, Japan 464-0015 iroth@saybrook.edu

This paper will concern itself with rites of passage, in particular focusing on those embedded in various schooling and educational systems and used to signify initiation.  It will investigate how, as educational elements, such rites exist, are practiced, and remain significant in an increasingly anthropocentric world.  The paper will begin by discussing a particular case: that of Japan’s entrance examination system.  It will show how this system once served as an initiatory rite of passage, playing an important role in the mental and emotional health of individuals as well as in the functioning of the society at large.  The paper with then move into an investigation of contemporary Japan exploring how, over the last two decades, entrance examinations have fallen ever further into disuse.  This trend will then be shown to correlate with the development of overly dependent, asocial, and/or self-destructive behavioural trends among young Japanese.  The possible connections between Japan’s disappearing rite of passage and its growing troubles with its younger generations will be explored and interpretations based on a framework rooted in anthropology and existential psychology will be offered.   In order to develop a richer and more complex understanding of the trends in question, the paper will then compare Japan to both Korea and the United States applying the same framework to further explore how initiatory rites of passage can act as leverage points in the production of social trends. It will conclude by inquiring as to whether an active approach to the design and implementation of initiatory rites of passage would be an ethical and advisable strategy for reforming education. 


Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →

Speakers
ML

MingFen Li

ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Open
Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Relevance of Stakeholders for Tourism Management: The Case of the El Chico National Park, Hidalgo, Mexico

El Chico National Park (ECNP) is one of the most important protected areas in the state of Hidalgo. Tourism management of this protected area involves numerous stakeholders with different needs, resources and perceptions of nature. There are four forest communities that are involved in the tourist use of this park, but other stakeholders are also behind tourism activity in this PA: federal government agencies, state government agencies, municipalities, unorganized smallholder entrepreneurs. Tourism management of this protected area is a complex issue, particularly, when decision-making process is centralised by government bodies. This study explores the relationships’ structure among government agencies and community tourist associations (CTA) based on the tourism management of El Chico National Park.  This study presents a descriptive analysis of collaborative networks among ECNP’s stakeholders, using a qualitative research.

Keywords: tourism management, government bodies, collaborative networks, stakeholders, protected areas.


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

How to Eliminating Adverse Selection Action? Comparative Analysis on Credit Evaluation System and Guarantee System in Chinese E-Commerce Market

Compared to the traditional market, the e-commerce transaction still could not get rid of information asymmetry between the online sellers and online buyers. Adverse selection actions brought by information asymmetry have negative impact on e-marketing and reduce the efficiency of the online transaction. Now website such as TAOBAO (http://www.taobao.com) are seeking ways to reduce adverse selection action. Widely used approaches are credit scoring system and guarantee system. This paper takes transaction data from U disk market in TAOBAO as samples and analyzes the role of credit scoring system and guarantee system in Chinese e-commerce market. The results showed that the credit scoring system and guarantee system can effectively counteract negative effect from the adverse selection actions. Although the credit scoring system has a significant impact on transaction volume; guarantee system has greater impact on the trading volume than the credit scoring systems. In addition, relationship between the guarantee system and credit scoring system are not substitutes but complement for each other. In the case of the existence of the guarantee system, online consumers’ purchase for online goods options is still subject to the impact of the credit scoring system. The paper proposes thoughts to improve credit scoring system and guarantee systems to promote the efficiency of e-marketing in China.

Keywords: credit scoring system, guarantee system, adverse selection action


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Paper Session 4
Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Reinventing Democracy in the Digital Era using Third-Phase Science

The world’s future depends on its youth. Yet over the past several decades, the election process has suffered from a continual decrease in participation levels, particularly among young people. Democracy of the 21st Century refers almost exclusively to the right of citizens to take part in the official political process. Structured Democratic Dialogue Co-Laboratories in 2012, with young people based in Cyprus and Greece, and representatives of European youth organizations, as well as a series of Structured Democratic Dialogue Co-Laboratories with young people from 10 European countries in 2008 identified (1) Corruption and Lack of Transparency; (2)The Political System is ‘outdated’, and not evolving while everything else is, especially with regards to technology and ICT; and (3) Lack of a humanistic vision and of a feeling of purpose among the youth, in connection with the lack of confidence that they can achieve a change, as the root obstacles. The 160 young participants engaged in these 5-day long Co-Laboratories produced over 400 ideas and invested over 3,000 person hours to explore the relations between these ideas with the aim of collectively identifying the key underlying problems. The current venture, “Reinventing democracy in the digital era,” funded by the UN Democracy Fund, aspires to engage more than a thousand young people and about 100 media-, policy- and science experts from across the world in face-to-face week-long, as well as hybrid and virtual Co-Laboratories with the aim to invent a new system of democratic governance that will satisfy the aspirations of all people and will abide to the requirements imposed by the Anthropocene. The methodological approach is grounded in the science of dialogic design, the principles of third-phase science, and network theory. The dialogues are taking place in Europe, Africa, The Americas, Asia-Australia and the MENA region. The participants will be producing two collectively authored eBooks, one “50 Reasons why youth do not participate in political life” and the second “50 Descriptors of an ideal future system of governance,” as well as a “Manifesto for 21st Century Democracy: Requirements of new system of democracy.” The extensive exploitation of social media technologies will lead to the production of hundreds of 1-min video clips that will serve towards engaging a few thousand people in evaluating and selecting ideas using modern social media and Apps. This is envisioned as the launching of a global mobilization process, which will engage thousands of people in critical and reflecting thinking by sharing and discussing the video clips. The results of the voting process will be disseminated to the media, organizations and decision makers through various communication channels and are expected to make an impact in the global political agenda. The project directors aspire to engage ISSS scientists as mentors for young participants, as researchers and as advisors to the project.

 


Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →

Speakers
YL

Yiannis Laouris

Chair, Future Worlds Center
ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

The General Theory of X-Dynamics Systemicity

"The Bioethism paradigm" (acronym for Biology-Ethology, ecology - Humanism) fosters universal specificities relative to the complexity of Life's processing, which in form of open systems, appeared on Earth from biochemical components and survival proprieties within propitious physicochemical environmental forces (J.-J. Blanc 1996).

For reference, the author’s past proceedings were developed - part after part since 2004 - as the structure and chapters of a “General Theory of Metadynamics Systemicity”. Its building blocks are being centered on the Universe diversity of x-dynamics: petadynamics teradynamics, gigadynamics’, metadynamics’, dynamics’, microdynamics’ and nanodynamics’ systemicity.  The set of X-dynamics are, in physics, multipliers defined in powers of 1015 to 10-6, proceeding in increments of three orders of magnitude (10' or 1`000), such as: peta, giga, meta, kilo, micro, nano...

The publication of these works is meant to support the acquisition of a large transdisciplinary understanding of the “x-dynamics’ systemicity world” that sustains the whole evolution of the Universe system’s components as well as those of live entities (things, objects, individuals), while perceiving and experiencing sets of forces and fluxes. This is why the theory of Systemicity emerged from synergies as applying the principles of “The Bioethism Transdisciplinary Paradigm of Universal Systems” down to ”Living systems” both having their specific temporal survival” that the author J.-J. Blanc developed since 1996.

 “Systemicity” is a notion that surges from interrelation, interaction, intrication…within interdependent synergies. The systemicity of atomic and molecular cycles has made and sustains both cosmic systems and Life’s cycles on planet Earth along differential time periods (trillion of light-years to less than hours) and their specific retroactivity.

Intrication is the quantum entanglement of a physical phenomenon that occurs when pairs or groups of particles are generated or interact in ways such that the quantum state of each particle cannot be described independently — instead, a quantum state may be given for the system as a whole, in other ways its metabolism status. Measurements of physical properties such as position, momentum, spin, polarization, etc. performed on entangled particles are found to be appropriately correlated.

The different parts of “X-dynamics Systemicity” are developed through a new “reading grid” of natural structures and behaviors of entities, objects and things as adapting from “neighboring’” within “neighborhoods” (ecosystems) where they specifically cope with endogenous and exogenous events and forces inducing to the retroactive temporal restructuring of  their structure and behavioral aptitudes (as in part 6).

Neighboring is “to associate in a neighborly way, to communicate with, to live side by side with, and to overlook. Biological molecule sequences, as neighboring, are participating in the structuring and the evolution of “cosmobjects”(JJB), organism, species and entities along their reproduction abilities. It infers nature and extent of selective forces as driving the evolving shaping of atom sets and genes (mutations). In other words, as in this part 7, “survival means” possess diverse perception, memory and experience tools that empower their adaptability to the permanency of all things to happen and change, i.e.:  they possess means as how to “give sense to things around from their interpretation of what’s perceived. The choice of the sense given can be lethal or propitious to them as surviving.

 In order to exist, both objects and living creatures replicate and evolve thanks to their perception and feeling tools within global, glocal and local areas (ecosystems) and by their natural components which form their structures and behaviors. Resulting actions and gene mutations are permanently changing both the endogen milieu and external environmental ecosystems metabolism and components quality (e.g.: means used from vision giving out the formation of a move or a feeling driving to its systemicity result like fear; the gravity effect of two masses as sustaining a balanced equilibrium…).

Then on, through ecosystems’ 3D multi-layers, from proto-organisms to humans, their individualities have specific social traits and behavioral statuses that account for the diversity of species to get developed and/or to get extinct. For example, when the Earth became a "snowball" from a nearly total glaciation (-600 Mo/y), the survival of some neighboring bacteria and micro-organisms escaping the drastic extinction of most species, conversely perceiving ways of adaptation, boosted up an extraordinary explosion of marine species bearing quite new functions (- 545Mo/y), that then after volcanic holes progressively reheated the planet from the systemicity of sets of interrelated metadynamics.

The Universe’s global environment generates x-dynamics such as cosmic petadynamics (black holes? Black energy?), teradynamics, gigadynamics and metadynamics cycles... in form of systemic forces, fluxes and moves occur within immense gas and particles neighborhoods. Interrelated, they are some of the main physicochemical cosmic, galactic, stellar, planetary and terrestrial feedback synergies from which x-dynamics systemicity retroactions emerge (i.e. rock cycles). Sets of systemicity results make atoms and molecules to participate in the structuring of matter and cosmic objects (nebulae, baby stars, stars and planets, waters and rocks), within a molecular world that originated from and after the “Big Bang”.

Furthermore, the physicochemical neighboring conditions for planet Earth to stabilize within the “Sun’s green belt” was a balanced thermodynamics environment state issued from the presence of the Moon at the right distance so as to  become propitious for Life to “hatch”. Such favorable position, sustaining the Earth and Life evolution by development of x- dynamic adaptive pathways, is going on with objects survival cycles, forces, fluxes, moves and matter that are “perceiving, giving sense and experiencing” things in several synergetic manners, (e.g. plants  natural emotional intelligence. . .). Perception tools are organic features treating signals- like neurons- or other microtubule as protein links. Microtubules are a component of the cytoskeleton, found throughout the cytoplasm. The microtubule can dynamically switch between growing and shrinking phases in this region (“search and capture model”), a matter of neighboring milieu.

Life as a whole and living entities, while neighboring around, are confronted with gravitation, electromagnetism, chemical and physical phenomena, and particularly with temperature and the “thermodynamics of entropy”. Filtering their milieu symptoms and their environmental events signals, living creatures develop means of perception in ways their inner systems and organs such as the immune one, emotional brain with amygdala and reptilian area or vision with eyes are well fit drivers for supporting their survival behaviors.

The neighboring areas (mille-feuille as 4D-networks) are diverse but concomitant producing forces and fluxes that are dynamical drivers within the diverse ecosystems. Their systemicity results from actions of coalescence, conjunction, co-evolution, convergence, symbiosis, percolation, phase transition or threshold output, neighborhood adaptation, etc. Universally, these actions and mechanisms concern atomic, molecular and physicochemical world’s permanently provoking feedback that drives the evolution of systemicity cycles and perception means. Because of the development of similarities in unrelated matters or organisms present in similar environments, a balanced equilibrium is necessary to sustain the whole of things to survive temporally. The disappearance of a link along a food chain completely disorganizes the ecosystem’s metabolism endangering its sustainability.

Specific bonds and traits of structure and behaviors, as well as evolution trends of “surviving objects and living creatures” require certain knowledge and a memory about actions-reactions (drivers) from ago-antagonistic signals and stimuli in order to give the propitious answer to things. Issued from ecosystemic and socio-systemic metabolism and environmental statuses (climate, predator preys networks of food chains…), these signals sustain things on thanks to the x-dynamics systemic retroactivity reigning about.

One may easily understand here that human sociology shows such neighboring comportments and effects, observing then they are universally giving sense to what happens, adapting survival tools with evolution necessities and this thanks to their perception capacities (instinct…) and kind of memory qualities so as to give sense to things.

Keywords: systemicity, survival, metadynamics, symbiosis, feedback, entropy, metabolism, synergy, convergence, coalescence, neighboring, perception, sense, organs.


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:30

Tea/Coffee break and Poster Viewing
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:30 - 16:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Action Research as a Research Method in Architecture and Design

This paper discusses the use of action research as a research method in architecture and design. It addresses the question of how academic work in the fields of architecture and design can pursue research through methods that are appropriate to the nature of design processes. This question is relevant to much research work done in architecture and design, which tends to revert to conventional research methods oriented either towards the sciences or to the humanities in order to be academically acceptable. Action research is introduced as a research method that has much in common with applied design processes, and which allows designers to develop research in the spirit of designing. This paper aims to inform those seeking to preserve the applied nature of designing and the involved nature of the observer/designer while pursuing a higher level of academic rigour.

 


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Crisis Science for Sustainability

Sustainability science requires interdisciplinary and even trans-disciplinary frameworks for research in order to shift from disciplinary and sectorial studies to more appropriate ways of understanding whole system sustainability. While this shift is difficult to achieve within current traditions, an actual crisis seems to trigger many of the characteristics that would also be appropriate for holistic science. Disciplinary research tends to be the norm when we have a carefully planned research agenda and well-posed questions; but when we don’t know the questions, as is the case in a crisis, we instinctively invoke trans-disciplinary modes of learning. We may thus learn a great deal about system sustainability and system research by looking at the characteristics of ‘crisis science’. Here we review personal experience from scientific responses to oil spills in the 1970's.We suggest a general framework in terms of R-Theory (Kineman, 2012), which is a relational holon theory based on four archetypal domains corresponding to Aristotle’s general explanatory hierarchy and many other similar frameworks that have been developed separately in various disciplines and perennial philosophy. We propose general development of “Crisis Science” as a complex systems research field that has strong parallels with holistic paradigms many are struggling to establish in ecology and environmental management. Not only is there a strong theoretical affinity between these two domains, but by promoting Crisis Science publically and in mainstream programs, funding may be more easily obtained for critical integrated research that supports both purposes. As part of a Crisis Science research program it is necessary to train between crisis responses, and shared principles and methods are possible across many holistic problems we face otherwise in anticipation of possible crises. Pursued together, Crisis Science and Holistic Science can establish the Anticipatory capacity we need to avoid crises.

Keywords: crisis science, oil spills, action research, system sustainability, complexity, holistic thought. 


Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Initiatory Rites of Passage as Leverage Points: A Comparative Investigation of Symbolic Meaning in the Japanese School System

This paper will concern itself with rites of passage, in particular focusing on those embedded in various schooling and educational systems and used to signify initiation.  It will investigate how, as educational elements, such rites exist, are practiced, and remain significant in an increasingly anthropocentric world.  The paper will begin by discussing a particular case: that of Japan’s entrance examination system.  It will show how this system once served as an initiatory rite of passage, playing an important role in the mental and emotional health of individuals as well as in the functioning of the society at large.  The paper with then move into an investigation of contemporary Japan exploring how, over the last two decades, entrance examinations have fallen ever further into disuse.  This trend will then be shown to correlate with the development of overly dependent, asocial, and/or self-destructive behavioural trends among young Japanese.  The possible connections between Japan’s disappearing rite of passage and its growing troubles with its younger generations will be explored and interpretations based on a framework rooted in anthropology and existential psychology will be offered.   In order to develop a richer and more complex understanding of the trends in question, the paper will then compare Japan to both Korea and the United States applying the same framework to further explore how initiatory rites of passage can act as leverage points in the production of social trends. It will conclude by inquiring as to whether an active approach to the design and implementation of initiatory rites of passage would be an ethical and advisable strategy for reforming education.

 


Moderators
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ian Roth

Ian Roth

Associate Professor, iroth@saybrook.edu
Educational design; systems ethics; Cross-cultural learning and communication


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Understanding and Managing Sustainability Transitions to an Energy Efficient Regime in Medium-Sized Cities
Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Erik Lindhult

Erik Lindhult

Mälardalen University
ISSS Two Day


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Using Boundary Critique in Commercial Software Projects

Software projects have long been driven by a list of perceived mandatory "requirements" representing the features the software must contain. But this one-dimensional view of the end product has proven problematic. Stakeholders battle to have their prized features included, while the true value of the initiative is often lost in the shuffle. This paper outlines a new incremental process actively being used in commercial software development making use of boundary critique. By viewing the end product as a multi-dimensional object we can proceed to identify the boundaries and then enlarge them, even to the point of delivering small portions of functionality every week during the development lifecycle.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Daryl Kulak

Daryl Kulak

Vice President, Pillar Technology, LLC
I am interested in systems thinking as it relates to my work as a software consultant. I am also interested because I think we can change the world for the better using the techniques of systems thinking to their fullest.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Systems Thinking for Evaluating in the Anthropocene

The broad aim of this workshop is to provide some better preparation amongst systems thinking practitioners for opportunities of engaging with other professional fields of relevant practice.  The specific purpose is to enable systems practitioners to better understand contemporary challenges of evaluation through a brief systemic inquiry into alternative models of evaluation praxis.

Workshop participants will: 

gain a better understanding of what helps and hinders the uptake of systems thinking and complexity ideas amongst evaluators and commissioners, programme managers,  and policy makers;

acquire some practical experience in using a CSH-lite approach into ideal modelling;

understand the potential contribution of evaluation approaches in their systems practice

develop an initial platform for further exploration of purposeful systemic evaluation. 

Evaluation is the systematic, evidence-based assessment of the value, worth, merit and significance of a project, program, design or any form of intervention.  Evaluation is increasingly recognised as professionalised practise to support the implementation and development of policies, programmes and projects.   Over the past fifty years it has become an established craft; with 106 national associations of practitioners, with combined membership of many tens of thousands. 

Many evaluators,  policy makers and commissioners  particularly in domains of sustainable development and climate change acknowledge that ‘systems approaches’ and ‘recognition of complexity’ are needed.  Indeed to some extent ‘systems’ and ‘complexity’ have been anointed as the next big thing in evaluation.  Despite this, there is still limited actionable understanding of what that thing is, what to do with it, and – most importantly - what the implications are for evaluators and other stakeholders.

The three co-authors/ facilitators of the workshop have each had over ten years experience in working with evaluators promoting systems thinking in practice.  The workshop builds on these experiences, alongside those of workshop participants, in line with some findings from a small action research programme undertaken in the past year by the co-authors entitled ‘Helps and Hinders’. The research has been undertaken with members of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and the European Evaluation Society (EES) as well as other national and local evaluation professional bodies, to explore what helps with, and what hinders , the uptake of systems thinking and complexity ideas in evaluation practise.

Using these findings as a platform, the workshop design is based on a light-touch application of critical systems heuristics (what we call CSH-lite); a process of ideal design modelling capturing core influences of human systems intervention including (i) values, (ii) power, (iii) knowledge, and (iv) social legitimacy.  The workshop deliberations are orchestrated around an interactive mix of plenary discussion and mini-presentation, and small-group work modelling exercises.  After a short briefing on the helps and hinders research findings, participants will develop simple ideal models of better systemic evaluation based on conversations around (i) impact (cf. values), (ii) decision making (cf. power), and (iii) appropriate forms of know-how and expertise (cf. knowledge).  These group models are shared at plenary.  A final plenary conversation will explore the fourth dimension of  this CSH-lite enquiry - (iv) opportunities and challenges (‘helps and hinders’)  with implementing the idealised model (s) in the real world (cf. issues of social legitimacy). The discussion will explore ways in which to counter prevailing mindsets and politics that may impede systemic evaluation.

A maximum number of 40 participants is recommended for this workshop.  Prior registration on the workshop is strongly recommended in order to avoid disappointment.

 


Speakers
avatar for Richard Hummelbrunner

Richard Hummelbrunner

Senior Associate, OEAR Regionalberatung
In the past Richard Hummelbrunner has worked extensively as practitioner and advisor in the field of regional policy at various levels (local, national, EU, international development).During recent years Richard’s interest has shifted to evaluation, and has gained extensive experience on programme evaluation, lead several major evaluation assignments and been involved in training / capacity building activities for monitoring and evaluation... Read More →
avatar for Martin Reynolds

Martin Reynolds

Senior Lecturer, Systems Thinking in Practice, The Open University
ISSS Regular
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other.


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 18:00
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

A System Architecting Approach that Is Based on Context, Value, Quality, Function, Structure and Process Perspectives

Architecture is both a design activity (process) as well as the schema of fundamental things about a system (work product).  As a design activity, architecture is the act of creating a representation of an unknown and original object whose properties (like technical aspects, formal and spatial structures) must be well enough understood in advance. As a work product, architecture is the structure of the components of a system, their interrelationships, externally visible properties of those components and principles and guidelines governing their design and evolution over time. Handling this duality and realizing architectural designs that improve the value of the solution within cost limitations; provisioning for evolution over the system lifetime; considering the needs of all stakeholders; and ensuring that the system is well matched to its environment are the typical responsibilities of Architects.

The outcome of Architecting process is the Architecture. Traditionally, this process provides general guidance to the Architect and utilizes an envelope of practices and design patterns that govern the Architecture creation. Its purpose is to aid the Architect to synthesize a solution that satisfies the requirements and it is the responsibility of the Architect to identify the right practices/patterns necessary for creating an appropriate solution. While most of the existing practices look at developing an Architecture that satisfies the requirements identified by the Architect, we propose a context understanding, value proposition, function specification, and value realization based approach for Architecting that is based on the value co-creation system that exists in the system development and usage life cycle.

In this paper, we discuss about the theoretical framework necessary for such an approach.   This theoretical framework is based on insights arrived at by asking six questions that needs to be answered for the system to succeed economically. These six questions are:

a. How does one understand the Context in which Value is created by the System and its usage?

b. What are the benefits of using the system and how to discover, diagnose and understand these benefits?

c. What are the Quality characteristics that results in this benefits? How does one derive these quality characteristics?

d. What are the Functions of the System that will exhibits these qualities? How does one derive these functions?

e. What is the underlying Structure of the system that will host these functions? How does one arrive at this form?

f. What are the Processes that the System should support?  How does one design these processes?

The basis of the framework is the values viewpoint for creating and describing systems.   We illustrate our theoretical framework and approach by describing a management workbench.  

Keywords – Value, Quality, Function, Structure, Process, Context, Context Understanding, Value Proposition, Value Realization, Architecture, Architecting, Value based Approach



Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Anthropocene as Life's State of the Art in Disorder Production: A Sustainability Conundrum

This paper launches on the proposal by Eric D, Schneider and James J. Kay that life is a response to the thermodynamic imperative of dissipating gradients. Adding a twist to the claim of Jeffrey Wicken that “entropic dissipation propels evolutionary structuring,” Schneider and Kay contend that “evolving life represents order emerging from disorder in the service of causing even more disorder.” Drawing on Gregory Bateson’s definition of information, a self-organizing system can dissipate a gradient, a “difference that can make a difference,” more efficiently than helter-skelter falling apart. Examples range from transient physical systems (Bénard Cells, hurricanes, tornadoes) and chemical systems (BZ color flipping clocks) to evolving biological (bacteria, trees, ant colonies, coral reefs, brains), and, it is proposed, human/biotechnological systems (automobiles, coal fired power plants, smartphones, apps) passing the baton of Erwin Schrödinger’s “order from order” means for sustainably remembering and capitalizing on what works. The second law of thermodynamics driven trend of disorder to order to even more disorder continues ever more effectively as state of the art in disorder production in the Anthropocene as autocatalytic, “Matthew Effect,” gradient degrading, human impacts on the biosphere, aided and abetted by advancing technology. Human/biotechnological driven gradient dissolution manifests itself not only in the usual tragedy of the commons victims of industrialized human activity−the sixth extinction of species, the toxic smog in Beijing and New Delhi, the vanishing glaciers, the draining of fresh water aquifers…−it manifests itself in and is linked to us. Robert Rosen observed that a “material system [can] change its own behavior in response to a force, and…that same system can generate forces that change the behavior of other systems.” Under the impress of the escalating force of techno-dependency, our addictive drug, as a system, we, convenience driven, environmentally foggy, smartphone glued to hand, clueless without app, humans are changing our behavior in ways that change the behavior of other systems, biospheric systems not excluded, and, on balance, not for the better. A sustainable future for coupled human/biotechnological systems and the soaring gradient of advancing technology is an oxymoron. The accelerating technical order is producing a deepening skew, a crossing tipping point to out-of-control, global warming scale, disorder of orders. A case-in-point can be seen by extrapolating the increasing fragility of excessive interconnectivity, of climax ecosystems, as Robert Ulanowicz pointed out, to the increasing order of local and global interconnectivity rendering us, individually and collectively, increasingly vulnerable to looming, potentially catastrophic, collapse. What sustainability needs is the going forward stability of an order of orders. Viewing sustainability in the framework of flows and counterflows, excesses and deficits, concentrations and dissipations, of order as potent, transformable organized energy (exergy), a.k.a, power, this paper offers a possible handle on overcoming the formidable barriers to gaining and sustaining a sustainable future, ourselves hopefully included.

Keywords: Anthropocene, autocatalytic; convenience; dissipative structure; disorder; ecosystem; entropy; exergy; fractal; gradient; “Matthew Effect;” order; power law; relational self-similarity; Second Law of Thermodynamics; sustainability; technology 


Moderators
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

Speakers
JH

Jeffrey H. Robbins

Adjunct Professor, Rutgers University
ISSS Regular | | The title of my paper is "Anthropocene as Life's State of the Art in Disorder Production: A Sustainability Conundrum". The paper extrapolates the claim of by Eric D, Schneider and James J. Kay that life is a response to the thermodynamic imperative of dissipating gradients. Adding a twist to the claim of Jeffrey Wicken that “entropic dissipation propels evolutionary structuring,” Schneider and Kay contend that “evolving... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Designing and Evaluating a Conference-Based Critical Social Learning System to Support Systems Thinking in Practice in PhD Research

2Division of Environmental Communication, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Nadarajah.Sriskandarajah@slu.se

3Monash Sustainability Institute, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia 3800

Systems thinking in practice (STiP) education is poorly institutionalised across the Higher Education (HE) sector though needs to contextualise issues and studies and recognise interconnections are much in evidence across many different sectors. This paper reports on the design and implementation of a course-based initiative for PhD students keen to incorporate systems approaches (systems theories and methodologies) into their research practice.  This initiative is of particular relevance to societies like ISSS from the systems and/or cybernetics fields (here after cyber-systemics). The model that has been developed can be used as a ‘wrap-around’ to any conference offering where enhancement of STiP capabilities may be desired or warranted. 

The key elements of the learning system design are (i) a sponsoring host University able to offer credits for training; (ii) a process design based on systemic inquiry; (iii) pre and post-conference time dedicated to the participants framing of the inquiry, valuing of prior experience and group-based learning; (iv) dedicated staff immersed in the different cyber-systemic traditions as well as learning system design and facilitation capability and (v) freedom to use the associated conference itself as a source of input as well as being the subject of critical inquiry..

Students work as a critical social learning system, taking stock of their research trajectories and gaining experience in using systems thinking in practice.  The course was first developed by the authors and some of their peers alongside the International Farming Systems Association’s European symposia in Arhus in 2012 and in Berlin in 2014.  In Arhus the main focus was on making connections among issues of farming, food, rural areas and environment and negotiating boundaries for research in these areas, a process becoming more and more complicated. In Berlin the focus was on working strategically.  Both recognised the need to develop particular skills and abilities e.g. in systemic inquiry.  In Berlin in 2015, at the ISSS conference, the students’ focus is on “Cybersystemic Possibilities for Governing the Anthropocene” and the course design has been extended and adapted to include new elements and to be of relevance to students working in domains beyond agriculture.

This paper will describe the design process of the course and the theories and experiences that underpin it.  The evaluative data available is also reported.  One particular challenge in the learning system design has been which traditions of understanding to build on and which systems theories to draw to students’ attention.  Overviews have been provided as well experiences of using particular theories, techniques and methodologies.  The authors recognise that students face many challenges in identifying and developing appropriate conceptual frameworks and methodologies for their research and try to avoid advocacy of one approach over another.  They encourage students to approach the course critically and to take responsibility for their own learning 

The paper critically reviews a range of influences on learning system design and the effects of the course –both intended and unintended.  It considers how well the course has achieved its intended learning outcomes to date.  Students, presenters and designers perspectives will be included.  Issues of facilitation of learning, learning and teaching styles and experiential learning are addressed.  The latter has particular significance to the theme of the ISSS conference in that lack of congruence between theories espoused and in use (e.g. teachers not ‘walking their talk’) has been a long-running theme in discourses on education for sustainability.  For the authors, presenting this paper at ISSS 2015 provides a valuable opportunity for reflection in as well as on action (after Schön). 


Moderators
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Speakers
Conference Organisers
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

President (2014-2015), International Society for the System Sciences
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing and pioneering the use of Mode-2 modalities of research practice e.g... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Framing Risk and Resilience in Urban Futures: Reflections on a Workshop

In his concept of the “Risk Society”, Ulrich Beck remarks that societies and organizations are increasingly concerned with the anticipation and mitigation of risks to their assets, structures and values, and that this preoccupation affects the ways in which societies organize themselves, allocate resources, and structure their imagination of their futures. The proposed paper will use the experiences and of a recent workshop to consider elements of a risk-based approach to envisioning and steering macro-urban futures.

The regional-scale artifact of the Anthropocene that is the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in south-eastern China has become one of the world’s largest concentrations of manufacturing, human settlement and urban development, and is also subject to multiple dimensions of risk in the coming decades, stemming from global-scale changes such as macro-economic and societal shifts, as well as human-influenced climate change and sea level rises.

An intensive one-week workshop was carried out in the context of a Masters-level urbanism program, to consider strategies for the future urban development of the PRD. The premise of the workshop was to take a risk-based approach to structuring ways of thinking about the future of the PRD, and to consider interventions in the future evolution of the urban region in anticipation of these risks.

Six groups of students each adopted a different perspective on the urban region – social, experiential, economic, infrastructural, geographical, or cultural-historical. From their respective perspective, each group considered the value(s) implicit in the assets, relations, actors and patterns in the PRD, and the systems in which these elements are embedded.  Based on this understanding, groups considered the dimensions of risk posed to these systems and relations by the anticipated macro-scale changes.

The goal of this workshop was not to develop urban projects as “solutions” to the issues being addressed, which is far beyond the possible scope of such a workshop, or of any individual institution, but rather to rehearse ways of engaging issues of this magnitude and intractability, and thinking about what could be done in terms of the structure, organization and control of the many urban systems that constitute this region, in order that these systems may go through the learning and adaptation processes necessary to address these issues on an ongoing basis.

Students were encouraged to shift from a problem-solving approach to an adaptation approach to urban evolution, in which they were engaged in anticipating and planning for the need to change, not just to mitigate the negative effects of unavoidable contextual change, but to take the changes as opportunities to reconfigure urban systems in an intentional and beneficial way.

Thus, as a final step, groups were asked to anticipate the policy and education implications of putting into action the adaptive processes they foresee, particularly in terms of “who needs to learn what?” Data presentation, mapping, diagramming and narrative techniques were used throughout the process.

The paper will discuss the philosophical and pedagogical underpinnings of the workshop, describe and illustrate the process through which these ideas were investigated, the themes, insights and issues that emerged in the discussion that developed around the workshop, and offer reflections on what was learned and revealed through this intensive exercise.


Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →

Speakers
TJ

Timothy Jachna

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Systems Research: How Do We Discover What We Need to Know, According to Whom, and for What Purpose?

The idea of the Anthropocene, an era in which human presence and behavior have become the most important factors of change on the Earth, increases long-standing questions about research.  How do we discover what we need to know according to whom and for what purpose? 

At a time in which the most troubling problems are often labeled as systemic (e.g. global financial relationships, environmental concerns, weather-related catastrophes, etc.) there is a need to reevaluate the ways in which we learn about and model the worlds in which we live. Increasingly, thought leaders recognize that critical thinking and positivistic approaches, while valuable, are insufficient to comprehensively and constructively address the most pressing issues of our time. It is not enough to diagnose problems through reductionist approaches. As the urgency of issues related to governing the Anthropocene becomes more prevalent, Systems Research is gaining increased attention across and beyond the Systems Sciences.

Most research is still judged by the tenants of traditional science, which include the isolation of variables in controlled settings, measurement and quantitative analyses of data, and extrapolation of findings to a wider universe (i.e. beyond the studied samples).  Qualitative research methods (including phenomenology, grounded theory, action research, and others) offer alternative approaches for studying humans, but are considered to be less rigorous than quantitative methods in many academic realms.  Methods such as System Dynamics attempt to capture relationships between variables, but are often limited (in this case, primarily to feedback between variables in the form of stocks and flows).

An equally challenging problem is the degree to which knowledge remains defined within long-standing disciplines, with little capacity for transcending those barriers.  At best, each discipline tends to project its own views and knowledge as somewhat universal principles. Most research is still judged by the tenants of traditional science, which include the isolation of variables in controlled settings, measurement and quantitative analyses of data, and extrapolation of findings to a wider universe (i.e. beyond the studied samples).  Qualitative research methods (including phenomenology, grounded theory, action research, and others) offer alternative approaches for studying humans, but are considered to be less rigorous than quantitative methods in many academic realms. 

Governing the Anthropocene requires not only systemic understanding but systemic leadership. Systems Research is part of a portfolio of systemic approaches to help leaders and stakeholders assess, design, develop, implement, and evaluate programs for effective governance of the Anthropocene.

At the IFSR Conversation (2014), an inquiry by a team of systemicists delved into questions related to the need, value, definition, and distinctions of Systems Research. The Systems Research Team’s (SRT) work focused on a compelling question, “What distinguishes Systems Research from other forms of research?” This question propelled the Conversation in multiple directions; however, two threads predominated – those that were divergent (e.g. the broad scope of the Systems Sciences) and those that were convergent (e.g. definition of rigorous research and modeling). As a result, the SRT’s Conversation began to scope out the breadth and depth of this subject. The SRT proposed a framework for examining several questions related to designing, developing, conducting, and evaluating Systems Research. Ultimately, the SRT proposed another compelling question for the future work of the SRT and the Systems community, “What can WE provide to enhance the quality and impact of Systems Research?”

To address this latter question, two additional provocative questions concerning Systems Research have emerged:

What is missing in current research approaches that systems approaches can bridge?

Why does it matter?

This presentation will address these questions by exploring the literature that has addressed the distinguishing dynamics of systemic approaches to research and problem solving. This retrospective will be the foundation for interactive dialogue with ISSS participants attending this session. The intention is to develop a leadership path for Systems Research and its role in more effective governance of the Anthropocene.


Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mary Edson

Mary Edson

President, maredson.s3@gmail.com
Mary Edson is President of the International Federation for Systems Research.  As a Scholar/Practitioner whose major interests are in Complex Adaptive Social Systems, she teaches courses in Executive Leadership, Strategic Project Management, and Talent Management including Diversity and Inclusion. Through experiential learning and development of organizational leadership competencies, her students apply systems thinking to improve business... Read More →
avatar for Gary Metcalf

Gary Metcalf

President, gmetcalf@InterConnectionsLLC.com
President, International Federation for Systems Research | Gary S. Metcalf received a PhD in Human Science in 2000 at the Saybrook Graduate School. His doctoral research was conducted under the mentorship of Béla H. Bánáthy, focused on Social Systems Design and Organizational Development.Metcalf began his professional career as a systems-oriented family therapist, then spent twelve years in large corporations... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

A CRM Systemic Model in Mexican SMEs for the Hotel Sector

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Can We Use Maturana's Theory of Autopoiesis to Enhance Checkland's Soft Systems Methodology?

Amongst the systemic methodologies available to systems practitioners, Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) is one of the most used problem structuring methods. However, some critics have argued that it has serious shortcomings particularly in the initial phases when SSM attempts to structure the situation and when deciding which areas of a problematic situation are deemed to be selected as relevant. Also, issues of power and dominance are left to the SSM practitioner’s own devises; the tools offered, e.g.: rich pictures and the three analyses are only sketched guidelines/models and in some cases not useful and arguable difficult to operationalise. Furthermore, during and after an SSM intervention, during  the process debating changes, when SSM advises to implement ‘culturally desirable’ and ‘systemically feasible’ changes offers the concept of “accommodation” a key and subtle feature of SSM , the researcher is left with a vague idea about as to how to use it, leaving a frustrating gap in the methodology.  

As it has widely reported in the management science and system literature, Soft Systems Methodology operates under what is called the interpretivism paradigm. The main tenets of this paradigm are that reality is complex; it is socially constructed; and a product of continues people’ interactions (interpretivist Ontology); also it assumes that the observer is not independent that is: a point of view (perspective) influences whatever is studied. Under this paradigm, the aim of any intervention is therefore to understand reality through interpretative process in which meaning is attributed (anti-positivist epistemology). No perspective exhausts the richness of reality or distorts the nature of things; each view is unitary not global.

While Checkland approach lies certainly in the interpretivist camp, the philosophical implications of Maturana work are more difficult to frame. Maturana theories of cognition imply certainly an antirealist ontological position. Epistemologically, he claims that the world as we experience (or constitute) is a subject depend and that that objective knowledge (or transcendental knowledge as he labels it) is impossible. For some commentators, his position is inconsistent and rather than confining him into the constructivism, he can be better understood as critical realist. For others his radical claims denying the existence of any independent reality (make him a candidate of radical constructivism. In this paper, and for the purposes of contrasting the two approaches and seeking synergies between them, we will adopt the most widely argument of placing him in the constructivism camp.

The work of Maturana and Varela  on the nature of living, the biological nature of cognition and knowledge have been having a far reaching influence on the systems and various others fields. It has been argued that Maturana’s ideas lean more to a constructivist paradigm.  We argue that SSM popularity and some reportedly shortcoming in its application seems to be a consequence of the interpretivism position, and we proposed to address this by bringing concepts developed around  Maturana’s theory of autopoiesis (ToA) and Biology of Cognition (BoC).

This paper attempts to address SSM limitations and attempts to enhance the above SSM applications, by exploring how two key concepts from Maturana’s ToA and BoC namely: (i) Structured-Determined Systems; and (ii) Organizational Closure might help to overcome the limitations and complement Checkland's SSM process. In this paper, we propose a SSM autopoietic framework in which the above concepts are grafted in the well-known SSM 7-steps. This is a work in progress work and in this paper, we present the framework together with a number of questions to reflect as a way to refine the model before using it in practice. We hope to use the model in a real world situation later on.

Keywords: Autopoiesis; SSM; Biology of Cognition; Accommodation; decision process


Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Speakers
AP

Alberto Paucar-Caceres

Manchester Metropolitan University
ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Redefining Scientific Objectivity

Since the time of Rene Descartes, the definition within science of what “Objectivity” means has been based on the perspective of a machine. In other words; mindless and lifeless. Since the entailment for any machine to come into being exists outside the machine itself,  it is no surprise that a science based on this kind of thinking has trouble with concepts like “health”. And yet, every living organism that exists has come into being with its own, internal value for what “health” means. That value is always based entirely on another internally derived value that each living organism also has: the definition for “self”. Whatever “self” is defined as being, that’s what “health” will be predicated on.  Therefore, “Health-Of-Self” is what metabolism and repair are constantly involved in maintaining. Metabolism and Repair are the two functional capacities, according to Robert Rosen, that are both necessary and sufficient for life.

Mainstream science has built itself around the paradigm of Physics, extending those concepts and premises into other disciplines with the understandable presumption that if everything in the material world is made up of the same building blocks, then all are related in various ways and the rules will cross the artificial boundaries created by human perception. Unfortunately, what seemed to be representative of “the rules” by which the material world works (when applying them to orbital phenomena and other aspects of non-living systems) turn out to be woefully inadequate-- to the point of being inappropriate-- when we try to extend them to most of the observable phenomena in biology. The notions of function and dysfunction, for example: In medical and veterinary science, we have to contend with the fact that “health” is the object of a practice that cannot even define the term, scientifically. That’s schizophrenic to say the least.  Given the circumstances,  medical science has chosen to mainly focus on defining disease and dysfunction, looking for ways to rectify both without having to address the messy reality that there is no way to understand what “health” is from the perspective of total scientific objectivity, as it currently stands.

Similarly; in the branches of science devoted to studying ecosystems and the biosphere, we find there are further impediments to true understanding caused by this machine-like mindset. Every single living organism has the same self-based perspective with all of its behavior going towards maintaining and enhancing health-of-self. That is an inherently non-objective point of view. How are we to understand what we observe of  living behavior, as well as all the interactions between individual organisms or groups of organisms, without taking such facts into account? And how shall we define “health” for ecosystems? Can an ecosystem actually be “unhealthy”? How and when? According to whose perspective? When we talk about predator/prey relationships being beneficial for ecosystems and even for populations of the prey species, how shall we describe the impact on the health of the individual who is eaten? What if the “predator” is a pathogen like the Ebola virus and the prey is humanity?

The trouble in this situation is that we end up violating critical principles of what science is for by trying to adhere to a standard of objectivity that needs to be amended. It  was generated while observing non-living, purely reactive systems. Applying a methodology designed for studying and describing orbital mechanics to living, Anticipatory Systems turns out to be counter-productive and yet what are the alternatives?
This paper will explore the process of considering what an alternative working definition for “scientific objectivity” should be: one that is not a source of unnecessary impediments to advancing the science of life and living, but still maintains the positive attributes of independence and verifiable knowledge that were intended with the development of the methodology of science as a system of inquiry in the first place. 


Moderators
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Strategic Planning During the Most Recent Anthropocene

Due to the constantly increasing rate of change faced during the current Anthropocene traditional approaches to strategic planning are no longer capable of producing the desired results. Most of them depend on predicting future trends and events so that organizations can prepare for and take advantage of them. Plans are made, priorities defined and action steps outlined based on the originally identified objectives. The problem is that the length of time for which we are able to accurately predict the future is shrinking rapidly so that by the time we get around to implementing our decisions they are too frequently obsolete. What we need is a new paradigm that makes organizations capable of learning continually from their environment and adapting rapidly. Interactive Planning is such a paradigm. After scanning the environment to discover what currently exists, instead of defining project priorities the second step in Interactive Planning is to redefine or redesign the organization’s function, structure, and key processes in a way that is highly participative, that integrates the organization on all levels, and that encourages continual learning of the entire workforce. A technique frequently used to accomplish this is Idealized Design. In that Interactive Planning is a never ending process it gives organizations a better chance of deal effectively with the Anthropocene.

 


Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

The Display/Pickup Paradigm for Social System Behavior

Public education, a wonderful creation of human society, is currently troubled by a cycle of increasing decline.  Ever-increasing demands leave educators less able to address their own student, school and district issues. So, school quality goes down, for a 19 + 1 = 18 effect.  That is: if school quality is 19, add a new demand (+1), school quality goes down to 18. Then, desperate new policies are mandated every year -– too quickly for schools to keep up.  Over three years, the process looks like 19 + 1 = 18 … 17 … 16.  This poster explains this increasing decline as caused by [I] flawed practice in which the leader or supervisor ‘installs’ the new policy, program and tasks in the supervised.  This install practice is built on [II] flawed and conflicting assumptions. Namely, the flawed assumptions are that agency is in the supervisor, rather than the supervised.  Expert supervisors have observed the errors in this thinking and many have overcorrected for an emerging new paradigm that assumes agency in the supervised, rather than the supervisor.   The result is an either/or debate and conflict.  Clarification of agency, building on Boulding’s Typology, yields [III] corrected theory and improved assumptions.   Namely, cause/agency in learning and behavior is: dual & multiple, infinitely variable, and in everyone – learners and leaders. The result is a new unifying DISPLAY/PICKUP paradigm for education and management.  The supervisor’s role is to be the agent of the DISPLAY of the agenda and subject matter.  The supervised are agents of PICKUP, each at their own rates, for their own purposes.  [IV] Corresponding practices are proposed, with the goal that [V] 19 + 1 = 20 … 21 … 22.

Keywords:social system design; paradigm shift; educational systems design


Moderators
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Customer Centric Project Management Engaging the CUSTOMER in Defining Corporate Requirements
Moderators
Speakers
CV

Charles Villanyi Bokor

The CERP Group
ISSS One Day


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Food Production through the Lens of Relational Theory: Tomato Variety 'Bocati' grown in Germany
Moderators
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Method for Promoting ICT Engineering Safety

In this paper, a method is proposed for promoting ICT engineering safety learning from crisis management. The current majority of methodologies for ICT use reductionist approach (i.e. lack of holistic view). Therefore, we need more holistic methodologies to realize system safety, and system safety should include human factors. In particular, ICT engineering arena human factors play a crucial role in promoting ICT system safety. The Tokyo stock exchange was crushed on 1st of November 2005 by an operation error, which had a severe impact on the global. The human factors (operator error, maintenance engineers’ error, etc.) cause severe impact to not only ICT systems but also social systems (nuclear plant systems, transportation systems, etc.). A JR West train derailed and overturned on  25th April 2005 due to driver misconduct caused the loss of 106 passengers’ lives at Kyoto in Japan. The progress of ICT technologies (i.e., cloud, virtual and network technology) inevitably shifts ICT systems into complexity with tightly interacting domains. This trend places the human factors above other elements to promote safety more than ever. The emergent property interacting between ICT and human conduct should be dealt with in order to promote system safety. Crisis management treats holistic property over partial component. We introduce a human error framework to promote a holistic view to manage system failures. An application example of ICT human error exhibits the effectiveness of this methodology. 

Key words: Risk management; Crisis management; Normal accident theory (NAT); High Reliability Organization (HRO); Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

 



Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Open
Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

The Design of Inquiry for Business Growth

This paper is concerned with the design of ‘business growth programmes’, i.e. specifically designed learning programmes with explicitly stated goals of promoting and impacting on business growth. This paper is based on research into the design considerations of growth programmes in 3 European countries. It is the result of a two year European research study funded from the European Commission.  With this as context, using Systems Thinking we re-theorise the role of design itself as it applies to business growth programmes. This is achieved by re-tracing some of the most fundamental systems ideas back to Kant’s critique of practical reason. The paper draws out several implications, (i) to demonstrate the application of a new set of principles which are designed to simultaneously help to develop and evaluate future business growth programmes; (ii) these principles also can help explain the tendency towards sub-optimal growth programmes in current practice; and (iii) to re-consider the policy priorities and assumptions for supporting business growth programmes in future.

Keywords: Systems Thinking, Methodology, Systemic, Business Growth, Learning Programmes.

 


Moderators
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →

Speakers
JP

John Paul Kawalek

Head of Division of Management, University of Sheffield
ISSS Two Day


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Towards a Systemic Evaluation for Graduate Academic Programs in Mexico

The level of development reached by a country is directly related to the quality level of the higher education offered in it’s institutions and universities, particularly the quality of the doctorate programs in which scientific research and innovation are promoted and can be demonstrated by reviewing the papers published in international journals and the patents registered which eventually become goods or services that allow more welfare for the population.

In Mexico, the National Council for Science and Technology is responsible of guarantee the quality of graduate programs by evaluating them periodically, but the institutions are in the process of acquiring abilities to evaluate graduate educational system in Mexico.

Papers reviewed so far, focus mainly in evaluation methodologies that were design for industrial processes in which quality is very well defined according to the features of the inputs that go through a standard process and produces a standard output. None of the papers reviewed mention what are the attributes of quality in academic evaluation which makes of this task a complicated and incomplete one.

An evaluation methodology should be designed from a systemic approach with a anthropocentric perspective since these are socio-technical systems in which human interaction is a very important element. As important as a methodology for academic evaluation, is to find a concept to include the systemic attributes required to consider an academic program pertinent from an anthropocentric perspective.

 


Moderators
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

18:00

Council Meeting - Reindeer - All Board, Trustees, SIG and National Chapter Chairs
All ISSS Board, Past Presidents, SIG Chairs to attend.

Moderators
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

President (2014-2015), International Society for the System Sciences
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing and pioneering the use of Mode-2 modalities of research practice e.g... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 18:00 - 19:30
Aurora 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

07:45

RoundTable Discussion
Everyone is invited to the daily reflection RoundTable. We will meet every morning for an hour before the plenaries, Monday through Friday. Join us every day, or whenever you like.

Our RoundTable purposes are to open a space for daily reflection on our ideals, what we want to learn and create; to increase time for each of us to talk from about what we are thinking and learning now; and to be listened to by others, enjoying and learning with each other in a new way.

 Our format is:


  • We spend 5 minutes listening to short readings.

  • We then spend 50 minutes on individual reflections or learning reports, time distributed equally among all present (e.g. 26 people = about 2 minutes each).


 Our suggested topics for the first morning will be:


  1. "Linking this year’s theme, Governing the Anthropocene, to your specific field of expertise, what do you see as our greatest challenges and hopes?”   AND/OR

  2. "What situations and projects did you leave behind to come here, and what could happen here that would be valuable to you in your work and life back home?”



Each day, a different topic will be suggested by a different volunteering facilitator in attendance.

Folk wisdom and compelling research indicate that participants experience surprising benefits from this activity after about four sessions. Our own experience with this format has resulted in the following theory: Just as we break the sound barrier when we travel faster than the speed of sound, we break the communication barrier when we hear 25 authentic viewpoints in 50 minutes.

Looking forward to experiencing this with you all.

Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Wednesday August 5, 2015 07:45 - 08:45
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

08:00

Registration
Registration is open from 8am - 6pm daily.

Wednesday August 5, 2015 08:00 - 18:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
  • Host Organization ISSS

08:45

Welcome and Housekeeping
Speakers
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 08:45 - 09:00
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:00

Keynote: The Ranulph Glanville Lecture Prof. Michael Lissack - Ambiguity is Real: Climate Change as a Subject of Second Order Science
Prof. Michael Lissack is the current President of the American Society of Cybernetics & Executive Director of the Institute for the Study of Coherence and Emergence.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Michael Lissack

Prof. Michael Lissack

President, American Society of Cybernetics (ASC)
President, American Society of Cybernetics | Executive Director, Institute for the Study of Coherence and Emergence (ISCE) | ISCE Professor of Meaning in Organizations | Visiting Fellow, Hull University Business School | Affiliate Member, Center for Philosophy & History of Science, Boston University | | Michael Lissack, the President of the American Society for Cybernetics, founded a non-profit research institute, launched an... Read More →



Wednesday August 5, 2015 09:00 - 09:45
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:45

Panel and Discussion: Second-order science in the Anthropocene
Speakers
avatar for Prof. Michael Lissack

Prof. Michael Lissack

President, American Society of Cybernetics (ASC)
President, American Society of Cybernetics | Executive Director, Institute for the Study of Coherence and Emergence (ISCE) | ISCE Professor of Meaning in Organizations | Visiting Fellow, Hull University Business School | Affiliate Member, Center for Philosophy & History of Science, Boston University | | Michael Lissack, the President of the American Society for Cybernetics, founded a non-profit research institute, launched an... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Karl Mueller

Prof. Karl Mueller

Head, Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics
Karl H. Müller is currently head of the Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics in Vienna which aims to develop a new perspective for cybernetics within the context of second-order science.  He is also a Board Member of Constructivist Foundations (CF), an international peer-reviewed academic e-journal listed in the AHCI. His recent publications include: An Unfinished Revolution? Heinz von Foerster and the... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Stuart Umpleby

Prof. Stuart Umpleby

Professor, George Washington University
ISSS Retired



Wednesday August 5, 2015 09:45 - 10:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

10:45

Tea/Coffee break and Poster Viewing
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Wednesday August 5, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:00

Panel and Pecha Kucha Discussion: Systemic Design Panel
(inter)actors’ Pecha Kucha

Chaired and moderated by Prof. Gary Metcalf

Panelists

  • Prof. Michael Hohl



  • Prof. Liss C. Werner



  • Katri Pulkkinen



  • Stefan Blachfellner







80 slides for 1600 seconds

a conversation

It is undeniable that systemic design approaches almost all disciplines and hence offer potential for a similar understanding (a general system) of how to design, which behavioral, technical or structural rules to follow, to take on board or to create. The panel takes on the role of a ‘crisp’ conversation between a variety of  ‘design’ perspectives in different disciplines, driven by and focusing on the challenges the anthropocene brings. Aim is to present short varying pitches ranging from innovation to material resilience, the relevance of geo-tagging or the necessity for education in design thinking. Pitches are to clarify and to confuse, to trigger and to embrace, to innovate, to criticize and to shake up.  

The format of the panel acts as interface and as systemic design methodology in itself. 5x15 slides, presented for 20 seconds each describe the blueprint for an agile construction.

Contact:  Liss C. Werner
lisscwerner@tactile-architecture.com

More information on the format : http://www.pechakucha.org/faq

Moderators
avatar for Gary Metcalf

Gary Metcalf

President, gmetcalf@InterConnectionsLLC.com
President, International Federation for Systems Research | Gary S. Metcalf received a PhD in Human Science in 2000 at the Saybrook Graduate School. His doctoral research was conducted under the mentorship of Béla H. Bánáthy, focused on Social Systems Design and Organizational Development.Metcalf began his professional career as a systems-oriented family therapist, then spent twelve years in large corporations... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Michael Hohl

Prof. Michael Hohl

Designer, teacher, researcher, Anhalt University of Applied Sciences
Professor Michael Hohl is a designer, teacher and researcher working with digital media. He likes making things, thinking about things, how we do them and what they mean to us. His research is mostly practice-led with interests including trying to better understand how technology changes us, while we think we are doing something with technology. Michael is especially interested in the epistemological questions surrounding these technologies and... Read More →
avatar for Katri-Liisa Pulkkinen

Katri-Liisa Pulkkinen

Researcher, Teacher, Aalto University
In 2014 the organiser Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Sytems Science sponsored again a special competition for outstanding research by doctoral students, co-organized with the International Academy for Systems and Cybernetic Sciences (IASCYS).  Katri-Liisa Pulkkinen with her thesis on “A bottom-up way of building a system and changing perceptions: urban pioneers as a model for transformation for sustainability” was awarded... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture. Werner edited‘[En]Coding Architecture – the book’ and ‘Architectural Ecologies – Code... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 11:00 - 11:45
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:45

Keynote: Prof. Peter Jones - Designing a future for humans to flourish: Reframing the long crisis of the Anthropocene
We now find ourselves as a systems thinking community inquiring into planetary governance for climate and ecological politics. The Anthropocene demands a planetary response, and yet we often find even our fellow travelers tethered to discourses of technological management, cultural change, and right action. Perhaps we might now advocate a strong role for social systems design as a process for continual engagement of citizens as stakeholders, as advocated by Christakis, Ulrich and others.

As we have seen power (economic and political) separate from its cultural histories, and become globalized, we may find ourselves in trajectories of action with marginal power to effect societal outcomes.  We are faced with a dual mandate of restorative system design, recovering human needs in our communities, and policy system design, restoring the long historical arc toward democratic governance. And as these are both designable contexts, systemic design can integrate ecological, technological and design thinking to guide policy in more productive ways.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Peter Jones

Prof. Peter Jones

Associate Professor, SFI Graduate Program, sLab (Strategic Innovation Lab), OCAD University
SIG Chair:  Systemic Design | | Peter is a US citizen that moved to Canada to discover new movements in socially-responsive innovation. He was a founding faculty in the SFI program and maintains connections to international research and design communities of practice, which he hopes to connect to student interests.  Dr. Jones sustains an active practice with the Redesign Network an innovation research company that leads research and... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 11:45 - 12:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

12:30

Lunch
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Wednesday August 5, 2015 12:30 - 13:30
Scandic Restaurant 3rd Floor Hotel Scandic Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin

13:30

Designing Scientific Research into Design Team Dynamics

This presentation offers an interim report of a research-into-design study between its pilot stage and its main stage. The study is an empirical investigation of the degrees of congruency between
perceptions of “creative direction-giving” amongst collaborating (as opposed to co-operating) designers. One ambition of this project is to investigate designing scientifically, while doing justice both to the paradigm of empirical natural science and to the practice of design, as it is reflected in cybernetic design theory. Another ambition is to consider the experimental approach from a design perspective. The presentation will be contextualized with an outline of some underlying assumptions shared by cybernetics and design research that are incompatible with the ideals of natural science. These assumptions are: circular causality, non-determinism, and the subjective, included observer. The experimental design of the study, which aims to bridge the aforementioned incompatibility, will be presented, including the design of a novel data acquisition apparatus, and related data analysis methods. Results obtained during the pilot study indicate low congruencies between perceptions of “creative direction-giving” amongst collaborating designers, possibly due to designers’ lack of sensitivity towards their team dynamics. Some possible methodological and design-experimental changes are being considered for the upcoming main stage of the study. These possible changes will be presented and offered for discussion.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 13:30 - 13:54
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

A Relational View of Systems Process Theory
Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Action Research or Design Science Research As Methodology for the Development of a Historical Digital Graphical Novel? A Critical Systems Perspective.

The legacy of Nelson Mandela is part of the lives of most South Africans. His story inspires South Africans and people around the globe to forgive and work hard to achieve freedom from oppression and poverty. For this reason, we need to keep his story alive and teach young people about the sacrifices he made to achieve his goals. Funded by an international consortium, a project called Mandela27 was launched to educate people around the world on the life of Nelson Mandela. Part of the project involved the development of a digital graphical novel depicting life in the prison where he served a 27 year sentence.

This paper investigates action research and design science as design methodologies for the development of the digital graphical novel.  The development of the graphical digital novel was commissioned to the Serious Games Institute of South Africa (SGI-SA) based at the North-West University.  A serious game is a computer game that aims not only to provide entertainment but also to provide an educational experience to the user.  

The SGI-SA often uses design science research as research methodology when developing games. Design science research (DSR) is a methodology used mostly by engineers to develop artefacts.  It is currently receiving high scholarly attention in the field of information Systems (IS). An important journal in the IS field, Management Information Systems Quarterly, recently published guidelines for the use of DSR in IS.  DSR aims to provide scientific rigour in the process of designing, developing, and evaluating artefacts. Its epistemological stance is that knowledge is created through the making of an artefact and evaluating the success thereof.  Many different approaches are documented but most often the following cyclic phases are proposed:  Awareness of the problem, suggestion of possible solutions, development, evaluation of artefact, and conclusion.

Since these phases are comparable with typical AR phases (diagnosis, action planning, action taking, and specifying learning) the developers of the graphical digital novel had to reflect carefully on AR and DSR to select an appropriate methodology for the project. Both these methodologies use existing theory to guide the development process. Critical systems thinking promotes holistic thinking, pluralistic problem solving, emancipation, and reflection. This paper provides a reflection on the design of the digital graphical novel from an AR and DSR methodological perspective within the framework of critical systems thinking.

The paper starts with a discussion of the problem environment followed by a short literature review of theoretical concepts involved in the project.  It then proposes a DSR research plan as well as an AR research plan for the development of the artefact. These research plans are then reflected upon from the perspectives of critical systems thinking. The selection of an appropriate research methodology is then substantiated.


Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Speakers

Wednesday August 5, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Bridge the Gap: Spanning the Distance Between Teaching, Learning and Application of Systems Thinking in the Workplace

This paper reports on a study looking at teaching, learning and application of systems thinking ideas for the workplace. It provides suggestions for designing learning systems to enhance the application of systems thinking in the workplace.

Drawing upon a qualitative interview process and action research methodology, the research looked at experiences of mature part-time students taking distance learning postgraduate core modules for the systems thinking in practice (STiP) programme at the Open University, UK. The study also investigated the experiences of alumni (from the same programme) as employees seeking to apply the learning from their studies in systems thinking in the workplace,  alongside the experiences of employers of the alumni.

The research was undertaken by a team of  5 systems practitioners involved with the design and delivery of the postgraduate STiP programme. There were three phases to the research. Broadly speaking, the first phase focused upon experiences of learning systems, the second phase focused upon the experience of applying systems ideas in the workplace, whilst the third phase looked ahead to examine better design in the application of systems thinking.

The results of the study in relation to the experience of learning about systems thinking suggested that whilst most students valued their study, there were a range of barriers to learning.  Students experienced challenges of making time and commitment for study and contact with tutors and other students, alongside difficulties with engaging in some of the more philosophical elements of module material and problems with language and the range and scope of case study materials. There were also some specific factors that supported learning that participants identified. These enablers included the high quality of study materials, the richness and variety of voices on the programme (including those of fellow students on online forums) and the integration within module activities to work on applying ideas in practice. 

Whilst some of these experiences of learning were shared, we also found that not all students encountered these challenges and enablers in the same way or in equal measure. In trying to make sense of the variety in experiences of students, we developed some outline sketches or archetypes of systems learners that provided an interesting heuristic account of the variety in which study on the module was encountered.

When the application of systems ideas in practice was discussed, we found that most of the participants who were attempting to apply the ideas in practice were doing so in something of an under-the-radar or behind-the-scenes manner. We found that explicit use of systems thinking in the workplace was somewhat limited, with many participants tending to work with systems thinking for individual sense making or off-line design work. For some of the practitioners, such an approach seemed to be experienced as a problematic constraint on the scope of their practice, whilst for others it was a more accepted part of organisational circumstance.

We found many factors that seemed to contribute to this approach to using systems thinking: employees understanding and sense of agency, the practitioners confidence in overt application, pressure for action that is 'practical' and within current 'frames' of reference and of course the employees learning from module material. We also found that employers had differing attitudes or modes of engaging with the employees skills in systems thinking which had some influence upon how systems thinking could be used by the learners.

The synthesis of this inquiry is emerging, including proposals for better systemic design in bridging the gap between teaching, learning and application of systems thinking in the workplace; for example, through promotion of action learning amongst alumni and coaching to employers of systems practitioners. 


Wednesday August 5, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Constructing and De-Constructing Leadership Identities

In this paper we will explore the following research questions: What is at stake when a group of leaders from different organizations construct and reconstruct their identity as leaders through narrative interviews about their challenges as leaders? How do these discursive constructions close down or open up for new perspectives and possibilities for change in their relationships, positions and daily practice as leaders? And how might these constructions contribute to or obstruct organizational change and development? These research questions will be examined through qualitative data from digital video recordings of four narrative interviews with use of outsider witnessing, which formed part of an action learning project. Our research is based on the paradigm of social constructionism and draws upon the following theoretical and analytical approaches: Positioning theory, discursive psychology and discourse analysis, deconstruction, narratives and storytelling in organizations, and relational approaches to leadership.  In the analysis of the construction of leadership identities we will focus on narratives, polyphony, discourses, and metaphors in the overall processes of relating, communicating and wayfinding as leaders in complex systems and ever shifting social and organizational contexts. Our main hypothesis is that the social and discursive construction of leadership identities by use of wordings, metaphors, and narratives, has a significant importance for opening up and closing down possibilities for development, learning and change in organizations. We will analyze narrative constructions of leadership identities and relate these to the daily practice in organizational contexts We argue that communicative, relational and narrative skills are important for leaders to construct and co-construct their identity as leaders and to co-create nurturing relationships at different levels within and outside the organization. After all, we consider these skills as crucial for the success of organizational development.

Our data derives from an action learning project 2010-2012: “Challenges in Leadership Communication”. The project was based on two dialogue conferences with the purpose of facilitating processes of reflection, learning, change and development through dialogical constructions and reconstructions of discourses, positions and organizational narratives.

The participants consisted of researchers and a group of leaders from different private and public organizations in Northern Jutland, Denmark During the dialogue conferences qualitative data was co-created through interviews and dialogues and documented by video recordings, photographs and post-it notes. In addition, participants and researches elaborated written evaluations and reflections after each conference. The combination of different types of data and mixed methods used in this project gave the advantage of both observing the processes and, at the same time, of having access to the participant’s reflections and evaluations.

A part of the research project consisted of using the method of narrative inquiry and outsider witnessing combined with follow-up-dialogues between researchers and leaders (co-researchers). Five leaders participated in this part of the project. Each narrative interview and outsider witness process took approximately 30 minutes. In this paper we explore six hours of qualitative data to examine our research question concerning the social construction of leadership identities. 

 



Wednesday August 5, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Towards an Autopoietic Management of Human Activity Systems in Mexican Tourism Sector SMEs

This paper aims to contextualize the management of human activity systems (HAS) in lodging Mexican SMEs in the tourism environment, given that the management has been constrained in its ability to respond and adapt, this affects the operational dimension as well as the service provided to customers. Complementarity between methodologies and models of systems science allows to set the tourism SMEs concept through the of Warfield’s domain science model. Due to complex interactions derived from the interrelationships among actors engaged in tourism services, it seeks to unify different views about problems faced by human activity system management and establish guidelines between the being and the should of it (Soft Systems Methodology), it is proposed that the adoption of the principles of autopoietic systems can lead management to a state of order and self-organization in the human activity system to influence the efficiency of the total system. Professors and actors with decision-making power within these organizations would benefit from a new perspective in the issues treatment of the human dimension of these companies.

 


Speakers
Presenter / Artist
JN

Juan Nuñez-Rios

nurje@me.com
ISSS Student
PA

Prof. Abraham Briones-Juarez

Professor, Universidad Autonóma del Estado de Hidalgo
ISSS Dev


Wednesday August 5, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:54

Dancing with Ambiguity

We live embedded in beliefs and premises (as indeed this statement is an example) that my be explicit or implicit and unaware.  I begin with the explicit premise that ambiguity is a concept that we have created in response to a desire for precision or control; a desire that is generally satisfied in only some situations.  My second explicit premise is that we live as participants in a systemic that we cannot fully specify or control.   Given these premises, I wonder how we continue to manage, most of us adequately for the circumstances we are in, however ambiguous they may be.  I claim that in part we continue to operate with a systemic dynamics on our part that couples with the systemic dynamics of our medium.  In part we simplify through various processes, all dependent on language, and thus create locally effective control and an illusion of certainty.

I will explore some notions of how these two approaches could have arisen with biological evolution and with the evolution of language, inclusive of the many implications and entailments of living as languaging beings.  Language and networks of conversation result in different lineages of beliefs and premises that lead to articulation as models (both conceptual and formal) which in turn serve to guide our actions.  As each lineage of language and conversation evolves, it progressively excludes other models and actions.  Since actions have consequences to the world we live, beliefs and premises have extensive implications to further possibilities.  Without denying the value of models I will offer some conjectures on why it behooves us to also accept and dance with ambiguity as a way of enabling alternatives.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Pille Bunnell

Pille Bunnell

Retired
Talk to me about what you're passionate about… I seem to find something in common with most people, some link. My passion is creating a path, through people walking such a path, for us all to live together in care and acceptance that includes rest of the biosphere as Homo sapiens amans-sapiens. Saying it in one sentence makes it sound unidimensional and vague … so lets talk!


Wednesday August 5, 2015 13:54 - 14:18
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

A Critical Systems Approach to Business Intelligence System Development

The quality, timeliness and availability of appropriate information to appropriate decision makers determine the quality of decisions; it therefore also determines the subsequent effect of these decisions on organisations.  Organisations that make better decisions quicker than their rivals are more agile and competitive.  Well-informed decisions improve organisations’ economic results and value; it improves planning processes and enables organisations to swiftly react to ever-changing business climates.  Business intelligence (BI) systems enable organisational leaders to make decisions more effectively and efficiently.  BI is a business differentiator in a world where organisations are becoming increasingly reliant on relevant, timeous, and intelligible information to improve their operational efficiency.

Business intelligence is built on the technological infrastructure of a data warehouse (DW).  There are various approaches available to develop a DW, i.e. the Kimball lifecycle approach, Inmon’s corporate information factory (CIF), and Linsted’s data vault method.  These traditional approaches are heavily influenced by the paradigm within which traditional software development approaches emerged, i.e. the hard systems thinking paradigm.  This paradigm is dominated by deterministic problem solving methodologies such as operational research and systems engineering; they focus on optimisation and design and are suitable for well-defined problem contexts. 

Traditional approaches enable the development of a technically good and robust DW.  However, a BI system is a social artefact as well as a technical artefact; it should aim to improve the organisational context of its users, rather than merely automate existing business processes.  Successful BI requires more than appropriate architecture and infrastructure; it requires more than a data infrastructure and platform built to access existing/known information better and faster.  Successful BI system development requires a critical reflective process that improves organisational decision making capabilities beyond what is imaginable, rather than merely automate what is easily observable.     

The critical systems thinking (CST) paradigm aims to explore relevant social dimensions of a problem context and provide richer, more meaningful solutions.  CST aims to facilitate social improvement.  CST is founded in critical and social awareness; methodological complementarism; and a dedication to human emancipation.  Critical systems thinkers aim to emancipate the oppressed by exploring and removing supressing societal structures.  This study views business users with unrealised business benefits as the oppressed; non-people oriented (traditional) BI system development approaches are viewed as the suppressing structures. 

The CST paradigm does not render other paradigms, such as the hard systems thinking paradigm where BI development approaches emerged, invalid.  Rather, within the CST paradigm the epistemological debate moved from the question of selection a single problem solving method, to recognising the value of combining different methods from different paradigms.  Therefore, CSH is consequently applied to complement a traditional BI system development approach to critically determine: what is relevant; who should assist to determine it; and how to handle conflicting views amongst relevant stakeholders pertaining to the BI system being developed. 

This paper describes an action research (AR) study whereby CST principles (operationalised by critical systems heuristics (CSH)) were developed and applied as part of a BI system development project.  CSH was applied during the business requirements analysis phase.  The application of CSH resulted in a BI system that are both technically feasible and realise business benefits in meeting users’ requirements. 

The paper starts with a discussion of the problem context followed by the theoretical underpinnings of the intervention. It then discusses the action research intervention in terms of: the diagnosis; action planning; intervention; specification of learning; and reflection on the learning.

 


Presenter / Artist
AP

Assoc. Prof. Roelien Goede

Associate Professor, North-West University
ISSS Dev
CV

Carin Venter

Student, North-West University
ISSS Student


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Architecture and Second-Order Science

Since 1980 Glanville has put forward the argument that rather than seeing research in design as one form of scientific research, we instead see scientific research as a specific form of design. This argument, based on the way that scientific research inevitably involves design activity but not vice versa, and others like it around that time consolidate a shift within design research during the 1970s from a concern with the scientific method to the idea that design has its own epistemological foundations as a discipline.

The attempt to base design on a linear version of the scientific method failed for reasons that have been pointed out by Rittel amongst others: because design involves the creation of the new, design questions cannot be exhaustively formulated in advance. Within architecture especially this has marked a parting of the ways between design and science, coinciding with the unraveling of modernism, with architects turning towards history and philosophy rather than science for theoretical support (but in so doing often continuing to import theories external to their discipline).

Given Glanville’s argument this is not what we might expect: if science is a limited form of design, shouldn’t scientific approaches be commensurable with design even if they are not a basis for it? This disjunction is only the case if we follow the changes in design research during this period without also following the comparable changes in the philosophy of science. Both broadly parallel each other: moving from a concern with method in the 1960s (Popper; design methods) through a critique of this in the 1970s (Feyerabend; Rittel) to new foundations from the 1980s onwards (the turn in science studies towards social and material agency, e.g. Pickering; design as a discipline with its own epistemological foundations). Indeed the critiques advanced by Feyerabend and Rittel, who were both colleagues at UC Berkeley, have similar structures: given the need to deal with the new, it is not possible to formulate methods or criteria in advance (other than Feyerabend’s reductio ad absurdum “anything goes” which also appears in Rittel). Thus contemporary accounts of science as a form of forward looking search, such as those advanced by Pickering and anticipated within cybernetics, can be read as applying also to how designers work.

Using this account as a basis I explore two ways in which we might frame the contemporary relation between design and science in architecture, both of which are in contrast with the resurgent tendency towards understanding this relation in terms of technological effectiveness.

Firstly, given these ongoing connections, I think we could consider design research in its various forms as one form of second order scientific practice, where the designer is included in such a way that this self-closure allows for reflexive investigation of this research itself. This is not surprising: design research is one place where second-order cybernetics ends up, partly because of Pask’s engagement with architecture and so with Glanville, Negroponte, Price etc. but also because of the conceptual parallels which underlie this engagement.

Secondly, more speculatively, I think we might consider architecture itself in terms of second order science; that is, we might see the experience of particular buildings in terms of scientific enquiry. One example is that of Price’s Fun Palace, to which Pask contributed. I argue that it is possible to see the Fun Palace not just as influenced by cybernetic ideas but as an instance of cybernetic research and as a possible version of second-order science in practice.

 


Presenter / Artist
BS

Ben Sweeting

Senior Lecturer, University of Brighton
ISSS Two Day


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Implications of a Theory of Emergent Nested Systems

Nested systems and phenomena of emergence are usually treated as separate concepts. I present a first attempt to combine them into a theory of emergent nested systems. Conceptualizing complex systems as emergent nested systems implies that there is real novelty, i.e., novelty that cannot be predicted. This has major implications, e.g., on forecasting and planning in complex systems. Some novelty may be wanted, other novelty may be undesired. How shall we deal with unpredictable novelty?

A further implication of a theory of emergent nested systems  is that nested systems change faster than nesting systems.  Discerning complex systems by their relative frequencies of their activities allows two developments. First, boundaries around ontologically real systems can be objectively drawn. Furthermore, one can see how the relative frequencies of systems relate to their position in the nested systems whole. This, in turn, allows to deduce new ways to effectively influence complex systems in three principle ways. First, one may work within the slowly-changing given rules of a nesting system, second, one may try to break up such rules by fast and alternative activities, or, third, one may try to change the rules of the nesting system directly. Conceptualizing complex systems as emergent and nested is thus relevant for discerning, understanding, and influencing complex systems. Novel approaches, in particular relevant to the applied sciences, informing activities of development in complex systems, such as urban systems, arise from this theory of emergent nested systems. For example, the theory of emergent nested systems helps to better understand the notion of innovation as well as strategies of bottom-up and top-down activities.

 


Presenter / Artist
CW

Christian Walloth

University of Duisburg-Essen
PhD Student


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

The Embedded Algedonics of Society

The embedded Algedonics of Society suggest a conceptual model for the study of social systems based on latter finding from the field of neurosciences (Kahneman et al) and the works from Niklas Luhmann.

Kahneman et al argue that the brain processes in a fast and a slow processing mode. Cognition processes information slowly in a complex way of meaning creation and sense making. The fast system is based on the algedonics of pleasure and pain.

Luhmann argues that for social systems we see the divide of politics and economy along the very sanction mechanisms of positive reward in the economy and negative reward in politics. The economy demands investment for yields, politics demand loyalty to regulations based on the monopoly of physical power. In this perspective the economy and politics resemble the fast algedonics of a fast system. All other societal sub systems like religion, science, arts and many more seem to resemble the slow system of meaning creation and sense making. In this we may want to refer to the slow processing system of society as culture.

There are two major implications. First, economy shall be based on positive sanction mechanisms. If this is not the case like in plan economy, socialism and capitalism as we have seen it in the past, it fails. Politics shall be based on negative sanction mechanisms. If political favour is based on positive sanction, like in democratism, the political systems is converted in a political actor which has a tendency for bankruptcy. Second, cultural studies have a chance to revise societal meaning creation and sense making and challenge the criteria and mechanisms of the ruling cultural systems to introduce, following Garry Marcus, functional sufficiency in contrast to truth, believe, aesthetics and others. Critical narrative inquiry then opens access for cultural exploration and impact evaluation.

Key words: Social Systems, culture, algedonics, critical narrative inquiry, impact evaluation

References:

Kahneman, D. (1973). Attention and effort. Prentice-Hall.

Kahneman, D. (2011). Thinking, Fast and Slow (1st ed.). Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Kahneman, D., Slovic, P., & Tversky, A. (Eds.). (1982). Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases (1st ed.). Cambridge University Press.

Luhmann, N. (1984). Social Systems. (J. Bednarz & D. Baecker, Trans.) (Ed. 1996). Stanford, Calif: Stanford Univ Pr.

Marcus, G. (2008). Kluge: The Haphazard Evolution of the Human Mind (Ed. 2009). Faber & Faber, London.

 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Towards a Systemic Business Model for SMEs Professional Congress Organizers in Mexico

During the last decades, Tourism has been one of the fastest growing economic sectors across the world, reverting importance by the governments as a key factor in socio-economic progress due to the revenue by the activity, employment and infrastructure investment.

Derived from the phenomenon of globalization and the relevance of the activity, tourism experiences a continuous expansion and diversification, for that reason, and the need of organizations to hold events in which information could be updated for their industries, MICE Tourism emerged in the late 1950s, consisting in the organization of Meetings, Incentive travel, Conferences and Exhibitions. The MICE Tourism highlight very specific characteristics: (a) interdependence between the various stakeholders; (b) extent of the phenomenon; and (c) the event and its inter and multi-disciplinarity, which requires knowledge of the economic, social, cultural and environmental context within a systemic vision.

In Mexico the number of companies engaged in MICE Tourism has increased; however, many have been created as a market opportunity, without reference to the requirements of the segment and a structured business model that allows their long-term growth and generate value for all the stakeholders; in addition, most companies that make up this sector are Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), which have many deficiencies generated by various factors, which does not allow them to develop more and in some cases can lead to its demise, reason why their study is relevant, not only to prevent the failure of these enterprises but accelerate growth and level of global competition.

It is for the above explained that this research describes how building a systemic business model can generate value for Professional Congress Organizers. Because of the magnitude and interdisciplinarity that involves the operation of Tourism SMEs, the research develops a holistic view from the systemic approach due to their ability to study the system as a whole and covering its complexity, allowing the study not only of the intern problems of the company, but the external factors that affect it. Specifically in this research, is used the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) by Peter Checkland.

The diagnostic of the Professional Congress Organizers in Mexico using the SSM and Strategic Management was developed as preliminary results of the research, showing the current situation of these enterprises, their strengths and weaknesses, the elements of the system and the approach of the Business Model according to the diagnostic.


Presenter / Artist
PR

Prof. Ricardo Tejeida-Padilla

Professor, IPN
ISSS Dev


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:18

The Fine Art of Goal Formulation: A Model of Naturalistic Theatre as Second Order Behavioural Science

Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:18 - 14:42
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Allegories of Storytelling: The Workings of Story Production in Organizational Sense Making Processes
Presenter / Artist
AM

Asbjørn Molly

Aalborg University
ISSS Student


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Building Interactive Learning Ground as Basis for Knowledge Co-Production: Reflection on a Collaborative Industrial Action Research Project

An important dimension of collaborative university-industry projects is the various learning which involved participants can co-generate, from personal insights to contribution to the answer of scientific research questions and instrumental knowledge of ways to improve industrial practices. Co-creation between academia and industry requires structures and processes of exchange so that learning is enhanced in the interface and interaction between the parties. It has less to do with ordinary project structure and more with the way learning can be enabled between involved parties through building interactive learning grounds linking the parties in an organization for learning. The paper is based on experience and reflection on a case involving collaboration between participants from ABB, Ericsson and Mälardalen University in studying and improving industrial service innovation management pursued through a collaborative action research oriented approach. (Reason &Bradbury, 2008, Lindhult, 2005).

The purpose of the paper is to clarify the character of such learning ground with groups of participants from different organization co-generating learning, and identify challenges in building a sustainable platform for learning. Challenges involve e.g. developing a common ground of visions, goals and commitments as well as norms for interaction, integrate and combine different learning interests and motivations to participate, finding and creating time and resources for interaction, space for reflection and developing mutual understanding and language, achieving fruitful exchange between diversity of professional experience and positions academic as well as industrial, adapting the processes to emerging changes in organizational contexts and conditions for participation, and create continuation of interaction beyond formal termination of projects. The theoretical background used is experiential learning theory (Kolb, 1984) as well as of organizational learning and learning organization, and particularly pragmatic theory of inquiry (Dewey, 1938), collaborative inquiry (Heron, 1996), and participatory action research and interactive research (Reason&Bradbury, 2008, Aagaard Nielsen&Svensson, 2006, Svensson, Ellström&Brulin, 2007, Johannisson, Gunnarsson&Stjernberg, 2008). Methodologically the experiential and empirical basis is ongoing dialogue and reflection on organization of the collaboration and outcomes in terms of learning. Empirical material is both formative and summative, particularly follow up discussions at project meetings, and summing up learning experience in final project phases. A focus is on clarifying the various kinds of learning of participants, in what situations they occur, and how existing conditions are enabling or restricting learning. Additional cases of collaborative research and development projects of participants is used as enriching and comparative material. The result is a case description and reflection on various learning effects and in what way it has occurred, as well as a model of interactive learning platform including sources of challenges in enabling of such a platform. It is particularly contributing to a more systemic and emergent view of learning and knowledge generation in co-creation processes and the challenge of combining a plurality of experiences, participants and perspectives in achieving high quality, co-generative learning.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Erik Lindhult

Erik Lindhult

Mälardalen University
ISSS Two Day


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Complex Systems Biology and Hegel's Philosophy

In this study I will argue that Hegel’s philosophy has similarity to the self-organization theories of Prigogine and Kauffman and complex systems biology of Kaneko, and is therefore an idea in advance of its times.

In The Philosophy of Nature, Hegel’s interest is in how nature evolves through the mechanism of self-organization. He was writing before Darwin proposed the theory of evolution, and his dialectic is aimed at analyzing and describing development in the logical sense. The important feature of this work is their analysis of the fundamental structures by which order is generated.

Hegel struggled to produce the concept of life from that of matter. He proposed that matter should develop into organism, but only in a logical sense. Nature itself is a system of producing spontaneous order through the random motion of the contingent.

Then Hegel tackles living things. He would like to say that the basis of life is the non-equilibrium self-referential structure. In more modern terminology, we could interpret this as meaning that the first organism emerged from interaction between high polymers. Living creatures exhibit flexibility and plasticity through fluctuations in these elements. Complex systems biology uses a dynamical systems approach to explain how living things acquire diversity, stability and spontaneity.

First, simple single-celled organisms arose through interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. These are the archae-bacteria in modern terminology. Next, the development of eukaryote cells from the prokaryotes is explained by symbiogenesis or endosymbiotic theory.

Then, multicellular organisms appeared. These were networks of cells or systems of selves. They reproduce sexually and necessarily die. The process of individualization is complete. This is just a return to universality. The dynamism between universality and individuality is self-referential. Universality (the first simple prokaryote) becomes individuality (the complex animal), and it then returns to universality (human beings with spirit). Here, it is important to observe that spirit emerges from nature. Nature has the purpose of producing organism from matter and then spirit from organism. It is teleology without theology depending only on contingent and complex systems biology.

Keywords: Hegel, natural philosophy, complex systems biology, the theory of evolution


Presenter / Artist
PK

Prof. Kazuyuki Ikko Takahashi

Professor, Meiji University
ISSS Regular


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Toward Ecologizing as a Systemic Design Approach for Planetary-Scale Problematiques

The problematique of the Anthropocene – climate change effects, oceanic and terrestrial deformations, planetary ecological disruption, massive human and species migration - presents humanity with the largest-scale design problem ever faced by human societies.  Effective human responsibility toward this problem system requires coordination of political, business, civil society, and scientific leaders and constituents over extended periods of time. The only problem systems similar in scale and urgency historically addressed by massive coordination of human and mechanical/artificial resources have been wars and space missions, and to some extent urban development. We might further reckon that these activities have been mobilized in their own eras by new modes of planning and forms of anticipatory and system design. We face an even greater urgency in this contemporary problematique, yet our sciences and practices seem ill-equipped to respond with definitive proposals and methods. As Bruno Latour (2013) writes in Modes of Existence, “between modernizing and ecologizing, we have to choose.” Choosing ecologizing, then, requires a coordination effort on the scale of our previous modernization projects. Yet the values of ecologizing are largely at odds with the rational, classically scientific, hard systems modes of such projects.

This presents our community with a compelling opportunity and ready-made vision for applications of new general systems theory across human, social and natural systems. We have numerous and perhaps competing systems models for approaching these problems, but unfortunately for the type of “engaged problematique” we face, most of these methods result in elegant analyses, not the most compelling antecedents for action. When we apply traditional GST modes of thinking to today’s multicausal systemic problems, we often proceed toward an inevitable paralysis of action, as we constantly find our agency and decisions trapped within disciplinary and institutional silos.

Systemic design has been developed in these most recent years as a response to social and institutional complexity, developed independently from systems sciences as a design-led approach to inquiring and mapping complex services and social systems as if they were highly complex industrial design models. As known systems principles were discovered in these design processes, it became apparent that systems-oriented design shared much in common with systems practice, but had innovated new forms of visual representation and collaborative participation in sensemaking activities. At the same time, thinkers in the design field (Harold Nelson, Ranulph Glanville, Hugh Dubberly) informed an advanced design theory from the systems body of knowledge.

Systemic design and systems practice share many similar processes. Both share a concern and interest for boundary negotiation (framing) and for attending to deeper action contexts than “problems as given” (problematizing). Both advocate social and participatory research to understand variety and to identify opportunities for transformation (or leverage points). Both advocate methodological pluralism to ensure different stakeholders are engaged, and that solutions are envisioned through multiple conceptualizations. Both aim for a sufficient satisfaction of a solution’s fit to its environment. While these practices may not share traditions of epistemology, use and types of evidence, aesthetics and style, or theories of change, these appear as areas for fruitful co-development.

Systemic design methodology has been developed as a rigorous field of practices based on direct social, action and design research.  Design research and design science enjoy traditions of transdisciplinary perspectives, as the design fields have developed in concert with a wide range of domains and applications. Systemic design has advanced as a multi-epistemological practice informed by ethnography, participatory design and action research, and foresight research. It is also aligned with formal methodologies such as dialogic design science (Christakis and Bausch, 2006), sensemaking methodology, and service design.  A precedent article (Jones, 2014) established an axiomatic and epistemological basis for complementary principles shared between design reasoning and systems theory. Systemic design is concerned with higher-order socially-organized systems that encompass multiple subsystems in a complex policy, organizational or product-service context.  By integrating systems thinking and its methods, systemic design brings human-centered design to complex, multi-stakeholder service systems as those found in industrial networks, transportation, medicine and healthcare. It adapts from known design competencies - form and process reasoning, social and generative research methods, and sketching and visualization practices - to describe, map, propose and reconfigure complex services and systems.

A project of ecologizing recalls Ozbekhan’s (1970) aim of orienting social systems toward “ecological balance.”  Ecologizing would entail a sustained attempt across human cultures and jurisdictions to restore human systems to agreed criteria consistent with ecological balance, a project that would necessarily require many years and significant coordination of social and technological projects. Such a project, with its social engagement and re-invention of services and their delivery, requires us to conceive of nothing less than a massive human-centred and environmental design project. Ozbekhan’s original thrust proposed that the Club of Rome engage a similar audacious reinvention of social systems to intercept the global problematique of his time.  We now live in the most precarious outcomes and effects of the problematique, of the interconnected forces and systems he envisioned in the late 1960’s. We are faced with a design project we might reference as ecologizing. It is therefore incumbent on our generations and collective values, resources and ingenuity to reframe, reimagine and redesign societal and political frameworks to facilitate our best design programs consistent with restoring or recreating an ecological balance for the flourishing and even survival of humanity and the life on our planet.

References

Christakis, A.N. and Bausch, K.C. (2006). How people harness their collective wisdom and power to construct the future in co-laboratories of democracy. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Jones, P.H. (2014). Systemic design principles for complex social systems. In G. Metcalf (ed.), Social Systems and Design, Volume 1 of the Translational Systems Science Series, pp 91-128. Springer Japan.

Latour, B. (2013). An inquiry into modes of existence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Ozbekhan, H. (1970.) The Predicament of Mankind. New York: Club of Rome.

Keywords: Systemic design; Human-centered design; Design methodology; Dialogic design; Social systems design

 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Prof. Peter Jones

Prof. Peter Jones

Associate Professor, SFI Graduate Program, sLab (Strategic Innovation Lab), OCAD University
SIG Chair:  Systemic Design | | Peter is a US citizen that moved to Canada to discover new movements in socially-responsive innovation. He was a founding faculty in the SFI program and maintains connections to international research and design communities of practice, which he hopes to connect to student interests.  Dr. Jones sustains an active practice with the Redesign Network an innovation research company that leads research and... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:42

15:00

Open
Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:06

Psychohistory for our Time: An Introduction, Bringing Freud and Piaget Into the Twenty First Century

It has become increasingly apparent that a deep and proper understanding of the present time, the past and a sense of what the future may bring requires  a keen historical sensibility concerning how people, nations and institutions function, coupled with the deeper insight into the mind/brain that the twenty first century revolution in the psychology and neurophysiology of humans yields. That is, psychohistory, based on the phenomenological work and insights  of Freud and Piaget ( with their errors clarified by our present understanding of the mind/brain) will give us a new understanding of history for our time.  I will bring Freud and Piaget into the twenty first century. Historical analysis will have a scientific, empirical basis which will also help to validate psychoanalytic and Piagetian theories.  


Presenter / Artist

Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:06 - 15:30
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:30

Afternoon Break
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Wednesday August 5, 2015 15:30 - 16:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Global Systems Modelling and the Club of Rome: Future Directions?
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Robert Hoffman

Robert Hoffman

President, whatIf? Technologies Inc
- systems modelling: Canadian Energy Systems Simulator, Australian Stocks and Flows Framework, Global Systems Simulator | - new economic theory World Academy of Art and Science | - member, Club of Rome | - trustee, American Society for cybernetics


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:00 - 16:24
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Apithology of Humanity Psychology: Humanity as a Generative System
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Will Varey

Will Varey

Principal, Apithologia
William Varey (PhD) works as a systems science researcher with a focus on sustainable social systems. His area of specialist contribution is in the systemic approach to the formation of generative potentials. He is a lecturer in systems approaches to systemic change management, sustainability planning and the formation of social learning systems. He holds a Masters degree in Business Leadership and Strategic Management and a Doctorate in the... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Complexity and Environmental Sustainability in Socio-Ecological Systems: The Case of the Winton Wetlands in Victoria, Australia

Sustainability in socio-ecological systems is a complex matter, not only because it deals with the interactions among social, ecological and economic dimensions but also because of the varied perspectives and motivations that different stakeholders have of different aspects of sustainability. The aim of this paper is to discuss the systemic nature of environmental sustainability by analysing the varied perspectives and motivations of different stakeholders around the restoration project in South-eastern Australia, the Winton Wetlands  project. In this paper, sustainability is studied in a holistic way even though only one dimension of sustainability, such as the environmental one, is specifically queried. This is due to the interactions between social and economic aspects that are revealed in the stakeholder’s interpretations of environmental sustainability. To address this, 502 people were surveyed about their perspectives and values regarding the environmental sustainability of the Winton Wetlands restoration project. The answers were coded for themes. Stakeholder values about environmental sustainability were analysed in terms of other underlying social and economic dimensions of sustainability implied from the responses. The breadth of values, perspectives and knowledge about environmental sustainability in the Winton Wetlands and their interactions with ecological restoration goals and outcomes reflect the features of complexity in that these interactions are non-linear and experience time delays, among others. This result suggests that even when dealing with one dimension of sustainability (environmental) there are important social and economic implications. Hence, more targeted actions can be developed when analysing or addressing sustainability in a systemic manner, regarding the elements and interactions set in place as well the features of complex systems reflected.   


Presenter / Artist
LH

Luisa Helena Perez Mujica

PhD Candidate, Charles Sturt University
ISSS Student


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Designing E-Commerce Organizations

Commerce is arguably one of the dominant forces driving social change on a global scale today, and within this e-commerce represents a significant component.  The retail e-commerce ecosystem can be viewed as pivotal in this arena, providing a bridge between the evolution of service technology and service-driven social change. 

The past few years have seen enormous changes in the retail industry.  Customers now expect a seamless and consistent experience from a retailer or brand as they move between stores, computer, mobile devices and social media, potentially buying from one location and returning items to another, sometimes even across geographies. This can only be achieved with a shift from a traditional product-focus to a new customer-focus, a shift that has a powerful impact on entire organisations and business models.  Many branded manufacturers who previously only distributed wholesale are starting up direct-to-consumer operations, and retailers who previously only operated physical stores now have online shopping websites driving a significant proportion of their business.  More interestingly, new generation retailers are realising that customer-centricity can only be achieved with engaged and committed employees, and this is driving an emerging employee-centricity that, to my mind, constitutes a promising new force for change.

In parallel, e-commerce software providers are changing with the emergence of software-as-a-service and supporting business models.  Demandware is an interesting example of this, offering a revenue-share payment model to retailers that leads to an unusually strong business partnership where both parties’ goals are aligned around revenue growth.  Working with nearly 400 retailers worldwide, Demandware is in a good position to take a more systemic view of the dependencies between people, processes and technology, and is highly motivated to help its clients address their broader organizational challenges.  A core part of the offering is shared expertise and evolutionary learning across the client community, facilitated through formal events, clients self-organising, cross-client research, and  included consulting services.

In this context, I have been developing a consultancy programme to provide organisational design and change planning guidance tailored for ecommerce retailers.  An early need was to develop a common language that could allow for comparison across vastly different organisations, so that general lessons could be extracted.  For this purpose I developed a visual, high-level e-commerce process model canvas inspired by the business model canvas from Osterwalder et al.  A focus on process avoids many of the issues arising from differences in terminology, titles and roles, and differences in organisational composition and structure.  The canvas provides a framework for capturing and comparing different types of organisations, and for identifying both business and technology factors that influence how processes scale. 

The partnership context allows me to work iteratively with clients so that my tools evolve through practical use while being expanded and refined.  I have found the e-commerce process canvas to be valuable for framing wide-ranging discussions and exposing aspects of a situation that might not otherwise emerge.  I will show some examples of the canvas in use, and describe the types of conversation it stimulates. I will also outline some of the ways this programme might develop, and would welcome comments from other participants on challenges, pitfalls and opportunities of such programmes.

 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Julie Billingham

Julie Billingham

Scientific Advisor, Centre for Systems Philosophy
Julie Billingham is Scientific Advisor to the Centre for Systems Philosophy (CSP) and an e-commerce business strategy consultant at Demandware Inc (under her married name Julie Rousseau)Her early career included 12 years modelling and simulation to support decision making, initially in the defence industry, subsequently in the environmental sciences and later in a range of enterprise spatial contexts. Having co-founded an online library... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Dialogue on Systemic Design
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Prof. Peter Jones

Prof. Peter Jones

Associate Professor, SFI Graduate Program, sLab (Strategic Innovation Lab), OCAD University
SIG Chair:  Systemic Design | | Peter is a US citizen that moved to Canada to discover new movements in socially-responsive innovation. He was a founding faculty in the SFI program and maintains connections to international research and design communities of practice, which he hopes to connect to student interests.  Dr. Jones sustains an active practice with the Redesign Network an innovation research company that leads research and... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00

Governing the Anthropocene; A Question of Accountability

Institute of Technology, 1900 Commerce St., Box 358426, Tacoma WA 98402, gmobus@uw.edu

The natural world of life is replete with examples of systemic governance subsystems that operate to sustain the continuance of those systems. Every cell, organism, population, and ecosystem demonstrates various self-regulation and environmental coordination mechanisms that have evolved to ensure the long-term viability of that system. A formal approach from systems science that is built on these natural governance subsystems may provide some guidance to our understanding of human social systems and their governance. The emergence of higher levels of organization in the origins and evolution of life can be seen to be the story of increasing sophistication in governance subsystems as disparate complex adaptive systems coalesce into “societies” of interacting entities (super-molecules to primitive protocells, prokaryotic cells to eukaryotic cells, those to multicellular organisms, those to communities, etc.). At each stage in this on-going emergence of higher levels of organization the one consistent aspect is how hierarchical cybernetic structures have contributed to the stabilization of functional relations among the component entities leading to sustainable super-entity structures. The progression is from simple cooperation of multiple entities to intentional coordination emerging to manage complexity. Information processing and decision subsystems (agents) that took responsibility for logistical coordination among components and others that managed tactical coordination of the whole system with external (environmental) entities, resources, and threats evolved to keep increasingly complex biological entities able to maintain their existence and reproduction. Now the governance of human social systems that seek to exist in some kind of harmony with the Earth’s ecology (what I call the Ecos) has emerged in the last 100k years or so and evolved over that time frame to produce the modern socio-economic systems in existence today. But it (characterized here as the neoliberal capitalistic democracy) is not as evolved as, say, the mechanisms of metabolic regulation. There are numerous reasons to believe that the modern governance subsystem is, in fact, moving human societies toward the opposite of sustainable existence. A systems examination of the theory of governance subsystems (hierarchical cybernetics) suggests pathways toward a more functional governance subsystem for human societies. The theory covers the regulation of economic flows as well as the legal superstructure and moral/ethical aspects of culture that collectively constitutes the governance subsystem of a human society embedded in a meta-system, the Ecos.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for John Vodonick

John Vodonick

Principal, jvodonick@gmail.com
Systems thinking, Critical Systems, Soft Systems, Neo-pragmatism, Consensus process, flying, sailing, high altitude mountaineering, scuba diving. cooking, music.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:24

Reflection in Action on 'Second Order Science'

The paper intends to put forward my perspective on Second Order science not in the mode of ‘tell it like it is (no one wholly and unequivocally knows what it is. This expression is beautifully elucidated in von Foerster, H. (2013, p.2) “The Beginning of Heaven and Earth Has No Name: Seven Days with Second-Order Cybernetics”. Edited by Albert Müller and Karl H. Müller, Fordham University Press.

However, there are praise-worthy, pioneering efforts and research in this regard (see Umpleby, 2014; Riegler and Mueller, 2014; Mueller, 2014; Lissack, 2014). Rather, I attempt to observe it as I see it. Second Order Science, in a sense, is seeding and sprouting, even if the idea of Second Order Cybernetics has been around for about five decades. Why this sudden interest in Second Order Science? Why is Second Order Science being discussed only in the cybernetics fraternity? What are the relations between the Second Order Science and the Second Order Cybernetics? For me, Second Order Science starts not with first Order Science but with Science per se. I do not see Second Order Science as some extension of first Order Science, rather it is Science; that is to be seen, that is being seen from the ‘second order’ from the start. 

Hayek (1979) points out that all science starts with the classification. In the physical sciences, objects are classified by unchanging characteristics that are both measurable and distinguishable by controlled and objective tests. But not in the social sciences. The social sciences, including economics are the study of ‘human action’, and humans are not programmed robots or automatons. In fact, economics ought to be more about the Homo sapiens and not Homo economicus. The standard Arrow-Debreu world of perfect information, perfect knowledge is a chimera, in many real cases and circumstances.

The essential point of science or scientific theories is its explanatory power; its power to enhance understanding. Also, the power of prediction is one of the virtues of science though it has its peculiarities and problems. And there is difficulty in forecasting too far into the future that leaves having ‘pattern predictions’ as a good enough second best solution in many situations. Hayek observed that ‘during the first half of the nineteenth century the term science came more and more to be confined to the physical and biological disciplines which at the same time began to claim for themselves a special rigorousness and certainty which distinguished them from all others. Their success was such that they soon came to exercise an extraordinary fascination on those working in other fields’. However, there has been a mechanical and uncritical application of physical sciences to social sciences (Hayek, 1942). Even now there is rampant belief and practice that the methods of the physical sciences—observation, experimentation and measurement- are applicable also to the study of society.

In the twentieth century, many modern disciplines, notably economics, and management science, triumphed to earn physics-like scientific status. But still, there is much to be achieved socially with respect to the understanding of many ‘social phenomena’, including the origin or unfolding of crises, be they financial, social, economic or socio-economic, cultural and political. Currently, we explain or see the patterns in these, mostly in hindsight.

Stuart Umpleby explains the ‘philosophical principles underlying Second Order Science’ as follows:  ‘Cybernetics has added two dimensions, not to a single scientific field, but rather to the philosophy of science, thereby expanding science for all fields.  The two dimensions are: 1) the amount of attention paid to the observer and 2) the effect of a theory on the system of interest. Adding these two dimensions to the contemporary philosophy of science would constitute a scientific revolution in the philosophy of science. The new philosophy of science becomes a more adequate guide to the development of scientific knowledge, particularly in the social sciences’. While taking the ‘the radical constructivist view of science’ Glasersfeld (2001) observes that ‘to most traditional philosophers, true knowledge, is a commodity supposed to exist as such, independent of experience, waiting to be discovered by a human knower. It is timeless and requires no development, except that the human share of it increases as exploration goes on'. But, all science intends “to co-ordinate our experiences and to bring them into a logical order” (Einstein, 1955, as quoted in von Glasersfeld, 2001).

Without an observer being part of the system, and without having ability and willingness to be in and out of the system; during observation and ruminations; in the multi-observer experiential world; it’s difficult to co-ordinate our experiences. Through the present paper, I am trying to reflect on Second Order Science, reflecting in action; with my curiosities, questions and confusion that might meaningfully expand the realm of the discussions. Specifically, I shall argue that Second Order Science is the body of knowledge that is emerging to study complex socio-economic phenomena with its own building blocks, methods, models and management frameworks. I can see that the Second Order Science has the potential to take the ‘understanding of understanding’ of the social or socio-economic phenomena; particularly all complex phenomena to an elevated level. The present paper is an explorative initiative in this regard.

References:

Einstein, A. (1955) “The meaning of relativity”, Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton U. Press.

Hayek, F. A. (1942) "Scientism and the Study of Society", Economica, vol. IX, no. 35.

Hayek, F. A. (1979) “The Counter-Revolution of Science”, 2nd edition, Indianapolis: Liberty Press.

Lissack, M. (2014) “Second Order Science: Putting the Metaphysics Back Into the Practice of Science”

Mueller, K. (2014) “Towards a General Methodology for Second-Order Science,” Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Vol. 12 (5), 33-42

Riegler, A. and Mueller, K. (2014) “Second-order science. Special issue.” Constructivist Foundations Vol. 10, No. 1.

Umpleby Stuart A. (2014) “Second-order Science: Logic, Strategies, Methods”, Constructivist Foundations, Vol. 10, 1, 15-23

von Glasersfeld, E. (2001) “The radical constructivist view of science” Foundations of Science, special issue on "The Impact of Radical Constructivism on Science", edited by A. Riegler, 2001, vol. 6, no. 1–3: 31–43.


Presenter / Artist

Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:24 - 16:48
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

A Systems Approach to Sustainable Forest Management in a Changing Climate

Climate change is expected to have widespread and unpredictable effects to the forest ecosystems on which we depend. The U.S Forest Service manages almost 80 million hectares with a mission of sustaining the health, diversity, and productivity of the National Forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. Given the uncertainty of climate change effects and interactions, the Forest Service will need to be anticipatory, responsive, flexible, and nimble. This paper draws upon foundational systems thinking to inform a framework for sustainable forest management on National Forest System lands in the United States.

Keywords: climate change adaptive management, ecosystems, complexity, U.S. Forest Service


Presenter / Artist
AL

Allenna Leonard

Principal, Complementary Set, allenna_leonard@yahoo.com
SIG Chair: Viable System Modelling


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Drawing Upon a Levinasian Ethics in Systemic Interventions

Systems thinkers have been interested in different problem contexts including organizational and social contexts. Multiple systems approaches have been considered relevant to understand and tackle problems in these types of contexts. These systems approaches are underpinned by different ontological, epistemological, and ethical assumptions. In this paper we offer an alternative conception of what a systems approach might be by drawing upon the work of Emmanuel Levinas. This alternative conception is grounded on the notion that the relationship between the Same and the Other is the locus where both knowledge and ethics are involved. Ethics is conceived as the rise of responsibility that emerges in the encounter with the “face of the other”. “Face”, which does not mean here “human face”, involves a particular encounter with infinity. The latter is something beyond knowledge, an alterity irreducible to totality. The desire to consider the Other as part of a totality with the Same frequently implies reducing the Other to the Same and failing to embrace the Other’s alterity. Some professional interventions study and deal with organizations and social phenomena ignoring or trying to counteract the alterity of the Other. The notion of intentionality implicit in these interventions reveals to the observer a world that is constantly his/her own possession. With the denial of alterity the unity of reason as comprehension and knowledge imposes itself. The rationalities of others are rejected. We argue against these interventions that impose upon the world the products of my mind, that subsume the Other under the hegemony of the ‘I’ and ethics under the notion of knowledge. Our rejection of privileging the totality of being is also a rejection of the unity of reason. Drawing upon a Levinasian ethics we argue in favor of systems approaches that conceive the world as a multiplicity rather than a totality, and that are moved by a desire towards that which transcends me and my categories, that strives towards alterity. We encourage systems approaches that foster the responsibility that arises in the face of the Other, that encourage the ‘I’ to be taught by the Other, that call the identity of the systems thinker into question. We propose systemic interventions guided by a metaphysical desire that tends toward the other, but without producing the disappearance of distance. This preservation implies a difficulty in reuniting under one gaze the Same and the Other, a difficulty that poses ethical problems to the ideal of total comprehensiveness that is common in many systems approaches. The aforementioned difficulty arises when we conceive a system exclusively as a totality. Although we think that this notion has to be preserved we argue in favor of also preserving the notion of infinity. To cope with these two notions in a single systemic intervention, we propose using a logic of “both/and” rather than a logic of “either/or”. Hence the systems approach that we propose aims at preserving both totality and infinity as well as Same and Other. We illustrate our ideas by presenting a systemic intervention that uses them to design a conflict resolution program for young people that is being used in rural areas of Colombia.


Presenter / Artist
LP

Luis Pinzon-Salcedo

Professor Associate, lpinzon@uniandes.edu.co
ISSS Dev


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Toward the Definition of the Local Development System in Tourism

The local development is an interpretive concept, which is generated by the definition that individuals and groups make on it. However, in general it helps to reduce poverty by expanding the people's capacity to generate productive activities that have an impact on the social and individual wellbeing. Tourism is a relevant activity for this type of development, because it allows either people or communities to interact with other actors in order to get bases to support its own development and the development of the environment. This function begins with understanding the use of the livelihood means and the relationship among the different environments that make up the local development. In this study a theoretical proposal is presented about local development through the systemic view in order to generate new ideas that support the local development of communities through tourism activity in Mexico.

Keywords.- Local Development, Tourism, Systems thinking


Speakers
Presenter / Artist
EC

Erika Cruz

Teacher, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo
ISSS Dev
PA

Prof. Abraham Briones-Juarez

Professor, Universidad Autonóma del Estado de Hidalgo
ISSS Dev


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Understanding Systems Engineering Project Development – A Traditional and Complex Adaptive Systems View

Systems Engineering projects often fail to meet expectations in terms of timescales and cost. Project plans, which determine cost and deadline expectations, are produced and monitored within a reductionist paradigm. This assumes that the cumulative activities, and their corresponding durations, that comprise the developed solution can be known in advance, and that monitoring and management intervention can ensure satisfactory delivery of an adequate solution, through implementation of this plan.  

An ongoing research effort within Thales UK investigates the influence of complexity in the development of systems engineering solutions, and the impact that complexity may have in the ability of organisations to meet delivery expectations. 

This paper presents a case study that examines the systems engineering function within a Thales UK business line.  The focus is the organisation, in particular how it supports the technical development of projects - what it does, how it works and why. The research is exploratory. It gathers evidence through participant-observation, interviews, documentation, and archival records. It considers two perspectives; a ‘traditional’, predominantly reductionist perspective, and a novel CAS perspective. Evidence is analysed in light of both perspectives to consider how each is able to explain the observations.

Research that considers an organisation as a CAS is predominately theoretical, rather than empirical. No reports of empirical research that consider organisations performing complex system development as CAS were found in the literature.  Research that considers the delivery performance of systems engineering projects is predominately reductionist. This paper contributes by viewing a systems engineering development organisation as a CAS, and considering the novel insights this perspective brings to the issue of satisfactory project delivery.

Keywords: Systems Engineering Development; Reductionist; Complex Adaptive System; Empirical Research.

 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Dawn Gilbert

Dawn Gilbert

Research Engineer, University of Bristol
EngD in Systems Student - Research covers theory and interventions surrounding problems faced by systems engineering practitioners in an industrial setting. I am an embedded researcher within Thales UK.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:30 - 17:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30

Systemic Design Workshop
An interactive workshop on systemic design for general and open attendance.  Following an introduction to principles and processes, small groups will form to construct design models in application areas of interest to participants (e.g. urban ecology, healthcare systems, political governance, sustainable business ). The workshop is largely based on the 10 Systemic Design principles (Jones, 2014) and Methods (http://systemic-design.net/rsd3-proceedings/theories-methods/

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Prof. Peter Jones

Prof. Peter Jones

Associate Professor, SFI Graduate Program, sLab (Strategic Innovation Lab), OCAD University
SIG Chair:  Systemic Design | | Peter is a US citizen that moved to Canada to discover new movements in socially-responsive innovation. He was a founding faculty in the SFI program and maintains connections to international research and design communities of practice, which he hopes to connect to student interests.  Dr. Jones sustains an active practice with the Redesign Network an innovation research company that leads research and... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:48

A Machian Functional Relations Perspective on Complexity and the Systems Approach

The poster discusses two related questions: where to ‘cut’ system definitions and systemic relations based on the perspective of the involved stakeholders. Both are historically related to the genetic historical /-critical, monist approach of psychophysicist Ernst Mach.

Ernst Mach transferred the then current Darwinian evolutionary conception to the epistemological discussion of the historical development of procedures and theories with implications for their ‘epistemological’ value. Scientists’ statements on the nature of reality need to be based on observations, which require an analysis of the ‘psychological worldview’ in and from which observations are identified, measured, analyzed and interpreted. The worldview of scientists influences observations, interpretations of observed facts and identification of causality in models of reality. In turn, observations lead to adaptations of the thought structure (in terms of models and causality) of scientists as much as to a selection of observations that are deemed legitimate to support or refute a hypothesis. At some point, this process necessarily involves a ‘cut’ of relations considered and analyzed. This issue is reflected in the work of Herbert Simon on system decomposition and aggregation.

 

For the analysis of (causal) interactions in complex systems (Auyang 1998), Simon and Ando (Ando and Simon 1961, see also Shpak et al. 2004) have developed the concept of (near) decomposability, based on the notion that the interactions in structured systems can be separated into groups of interactions according to the strength of interactions between elements of a system. Groups of elements (variables) among which interactions are much stronger than among other elements, are separated into specific ‘modules’ separate from elements with less strong interactions. It is assumed that most of these inter-group interactions can be neglected and intra-group interactions aggregated into single variables.

 

The obvious danger in this assumption is that interactions between groups of variables can be neglected respectively that microstate variables can be aggregated into macro-state variables over a number of conditions and / or for longer time horizons. This assumption may be correct in the short run or under normal conditions, but may also be wrong under longer terms and more unusual conditions. Thus from a ‘complexity / non-linear mathematics perspective ‘small’ effects may lead under positive feedback to the crossing of thresholds and phase transitions and then may be observed as increased stress, risk and catastrophes in a system’s development (cp. Thom 1989, Jain and Krishna 2002, Sornette 2003).

 

In human systems these aggregations in the form of system definitions and system models involve approximations and hypotheses on system behavior in the mental world of actors. These assumptions underlying mental representations of systems are likely to be proven wrong earlier or later with the further development of a (dynamic) theoretical system.

 

In order to tackle the question of where to ‘cut’ system definition, decomposition and system aggregation, the paper proposes to employ physicist-psychologist-philosopher Ernst Mach’s genetic perspective on the evolution of knowledge based on his research in the history of science (Mach 1888, 1905, 1883). Mach suggests to replace causality with functional relations, which describe the relationship between the elements of the measured item and the standard of measurement (Mach 1905, Heidelberger 2010) as functional dependencies of one appearance on the other. Measurement, system delineation and aggregation is thus based on the tools and perspective or worldview of scientists. The poster sketches the links between Bertalanffy’s and Mach’s non-positivist approaches and Simon’s formal approach to derive requirements for ‘tools’ to converse about system definition, decomposition, and aggregation (modularization) interrelated with and dependent on scientists worldviews.

 

 


Presenter / Artist

Wednesday August 5, 2015 16:48 - 17:12
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Open
Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:00 - 17:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

The Value of the Frame: Painting Complexity using two Chronic Disease Models

As with all chronic diseases, it is now recognized that Type-II diabetes is a complex health issue, the etiology of which involves numerous risk factors operating at different ecological levels of analysis. However, this ecological complexity of the problem seldom manifests itself in the interventions (leverage points) for preventing the problem, which typically focus on changing behavior through universal health education, which assumes a homogeneous population. This paper examines the limitations of this way of framing the problem of Type-II diabetes, particularly its failure to capture the way in which this problem emerges as a result of dynamic interactions between individuals and their environments and how these interactions vary in fundamental ways depending upon the context within which they occur.  Specifically, the paper examines the ways in which Type-II diabetes in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) is framed (understood, interpreted, and applied) and how framing affects which systems modeling method one uses to understand the problem and to help guide policy-makers to ameliorate it.

Each systems model has a paradigm characterizing it by a set of fundamental rules and underlying concepts.  That is, each method bases on assumptions of how the model should be constructed and the knowledge obtainable from such. By assuming the model should be constructed in a certain way, the modeler (whether implicitly or explicitly) frames the problem by making assumptions about the phenomenon of interest. Choosing to develop any model asserts a model proscribes to paradigmatic assumptions for how that model would contribute something useful (of value) in some capacity (for a purpose), which is ultimately affected by understanding, interpretation, and application (framing) of the problem. Selecting a particular modeling paradigm implies part of the conceptualization process of a system modeling study is in selecting a model paradigm based on these assumptions. For example, selecting to create a system dynamics model assumes the system-of-interest is comprised of rates, aggregates or stocks, and feedback loops (at least for the model’s purpose).

The LRGV was selected as the predominantly poor Mexican American population that resides there has the highest diabetes-related death rate in Texas and, in certain areas of this region, 50% of the Hispanic population aged 35 years and older suffer from Type-II diabetes. Addressing the problem of diabetes in this area is especially problematic as it ranks among the most socially and economically disadvantaged areas of the United States. Given this high prevalence and limited economic resources, a model capturing the extent of the health problem and analyzing an array of possible leverage points could be crucial to reducing Type-II diabetes in this population.  The question is: What should such a model capture? More specifically, how does framing affect understanding of systems models of Type-II diabetes in the LRGV and the type of leverage points should it be identifying?

The paper describes how specific types of systems methods, those using agent-based models (ABM) and system dynamics models (SDM), can produce very different ways of understanding the problem of and the leverage points for Type-II diabetes in the LRGV.  Additionally, it moves beyond simply outlining the general differences in the use and applications of ABM and SDM, to presenting models demonstrating how framing of the problem  and model paradigmatic assumptions affect understanding of the problem of Type-II diabetes in the LGRV and its potential leverage points. While the examples are specific to a health problem in a specific community, the significance of such an approach is in its generalizability to how understanding social system behavior depends upon how framing the problem and the paradigmatic assumptions of the modeling method selected for modeling that social system.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:00 - 17:15
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Facilitating Training Transfer Effects Based on Systemic Influences of Training Design, Trainees' Motivation and Work Environment - Empirical Evidence from MBA Programs in Vietnam
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder ofThink2Impact Pty Ltd and in Australia. Dr Nguyen was a co-founder of the internationally linked Systems Design and Complexity Management (SDCM) Alliance at The... Read More →
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00

Corporate Level Managerial Knowledge as a Complex Adaptive System

Managing a single business demands knowing about how to create and sustain its competitive advantage. Managing multibusiness firms additionally requires coordinating business diversity and capturing synergies that increases managerial complexity. Those challenges demand a different kind of knowledge. Based on a qualitative research, this paper presents a conceptual model of this knowledge as a complex adaptive system (CAS).  As a CAS, multilevel agents, synergy stimulus, adaptive responses and action systems compose this knowledge. Corporate level managerial knowledge characterizes as tacit, collective, integrative and collaborative. The research used a case study approach in a Colombian multibusiness firm, focusing on the top management team. The resulting approach helps to enhance the conception of corporate level managerial knowledge and this approach facilitates decision-making decentralization.

Keywords: Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), Multibusiness Firm, Managerial Knowledge, Corporate Strategy

 


Presenter / Artist
LM

Luz Maria Rivas

PhD Student, Universidad EAFIT
ISSS Student


Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:00 - 18:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:12

In Order to Create a Better, Wiser World We Need a Revolution in Academic Inquiry

We are heading towards disaster. Population growth, destruction of natural habitats and rapid extinction of species, vast inequalities of wealth and power around the globe, the lethal character of modern war, pollution of earth, sea and air, and above all the impending disasters of climate change: all these looming global problems indicate we face a grim future.  In order tackle these problems intelligently, effectively and humanely, we need to learn how to do it.  That in turn requires that our institutions of learning, our universities and schools, are rationally designed and devoted to the task.  At present, they are not.  We have inherited from the past a kind of academic inquiry so grossly irrational that it has actually contributed to the genesis of these problems.  The great intellectual success of modern science and technological research has made possible, even caused, all these global crises.  As a matter of supreme urgency we need to bring about a revolution in academia so that humanity may acquire what it so desperately needs: a kind of inquiry rationally designed and devoted to helping us make progress towards as good a world as possible.  The kind of academic inquiry we need would put problems of living at the heart of the enterprise; the pursuit of knowledge and technology would emerge out of and would feed back into, the central and fundamental activities of improving our understanding of what our problems of living are (including global problems), and proposing and critically assessing possible solutions – possible actions, policies, political programmes, ways of living.  The fundamental task would be to help people everywhere come to have a better understanding of what our problems are, and what we need to do about them.


Presenter / Artist

Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:12 - 17:36
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Open
Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:30 - 17:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

The Importance and Place of Family Farming in the World and in Turkey
Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:30 - 17:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Both 'Soft' and 'Hard': Towards Integrative Approaches for Dealing with Complex Challenges in Problem-Solving and Consulting
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Andreas Hieronymi

Andreas Hieronymi

Executive Director International Study Programme (ISP), University of St. Gallen
Systems and Complexity Theory for collaborative Problem Solving. PhD Research.


Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30

Understanding Mechanisms of the Anthropocene – Systems Science Should Meet Social Ecology !

Aiming to govern the anthropocene (Crutzen 2002) implicates to refer to an appropriate model of our global socio-ecological system (briefly: human ecosystem), that might be similar to the famous “world models” (Meadows et al. 2004). Usually, policies assume that the subsystems  nature (soil, water, air; plants animals), economy and society are deterministic machines where any system-specific input (pesticides / taxes/ law etc.) evokes a certain intended operation mode or output (e.g. “sustainability”) without considering side effects and feedbacks. In this context, any steering intervention is guided only by easily available quantitative indicators that are supposed to represent the function state of the respective system validly (comp. “big data” hype). Additionally, it is commonly believed that deterministically operating and (growing) economy is also the determining driver of human ecosystems: “If we ‘kick-start’ the economy everything changes for the better!”  In contrast, self-conditioned dynamics seems to be significant for operations of each of these systems. Therefore, understanding the interconnected but buffered dynamics between the subsystems nature, economy and society needs  the proper identification of major players in the respective and coupled systems dynamics. This knowledge must also encompass boundary conditions of the systems in order to reduce climate change and /or  keep biodiversity effectively (comp. Rockström 2009). Maybe, only with this knowledge it is effective/efficient to design and apply causally oriented intervention strategies.

However, already at the stage of modeling of regional human ecosystems, still epistemic deficiencies de-validate some usual models: theory-free collecting obtainable data across several domains (temperature, % land use, biomass & energy consumption /capita,  population size/density, DGP, Gini-coefficient etc.) and then building formal models for computer simulations without referring to theories of the respective academic disciplines   (geography, sociology, economy   etc.)  seems to be too pragmatic even if modeling methodologies of systems science are used systematically. In this context, it has to be admitted that there are not enough interdisciplinary (or better: “interfacultary”) conceptual frameworks that allow an integrated view on the world and that connect views of ecology, economy and social science. One option is the academic field of social ecology (or human ecology) that studies the  interrelations between population (or: men), society and “environment” (Hawley, Duncan,  Odum; comp. Glaser 1989, Serbser 2004) or the “societal metabolism” (Schaffarzik et al. 2014). Interestingly, the level of development of quantitative theories and models  in social ecology is  rather low (Tretter & Halliday 2012). Additionally, the methodological gap between natural and social sciences  should be minded more (Simon & Tretter 2015).

In the talk, referring to case studies several of such methodological issues are raised that might help to proceed towards a more sophisticated and epistemologically sound theoretical modeling of socio-ecological systems as a basis of ecosystems management.


Presenter / Artist
FT

Felix Tretter

ISSS One Day


Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:30 - 18:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:36

Modeling with G. Spencer-Brown
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Marcus J. Carney

Marcus J. Carney

writer, director, practitioner, TM


Wednesday August 5, 2015 17:36 - 18:00
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

19:00

ASC: What I learned from Ranulph Glanville
Speakers
avatar for Prof. Larry Richards

Prof. Larry Richards

Interim Vice Chancellor and Dean, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus
Larry Richards is a long-time member of American Society for Cybernetics and regular attendee at its conferences. He served for nine years (1983-1991) as Treasurer, President and Past President of ASC, and received its Norbert Wiener Medal in 2006. He is also a past President and Fellow of the American Society for Engineering Management. Larry currently serves as the administrative head (Interim Vice Chancellor and Dean) of Indiana... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 19:00 - 19:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

19:30

ASC: Staging Bateson's Metalogues: A Workshop Performance

Wednesday August 5, 2015 19:30 - 20:15
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

20:15

ASC: Living Systems are Learning Systems
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Nora BATESON

Nora BATESON

Founder, The International Bateson Institute
Nora Bateson is a media producer and educator. Her work includes documentaries, multimedia productions, magazine columns, and developing curriculum for elementary and high school students. Central to all her pursuits is the idea of utilizing media and storytelling to encourage cultural understanding, social justice, and environmental awareness.  She is the writer, director and producer of the award-winning documentary An Ecology of Mind, a... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 20:15 - 21:00
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
 
Thursday, August 6
 

07:45

RoundTable Discussion
Everyone is invited to the daily reflection RoundTable. We will meet every morning for an hour before the plenaries, Monday through Friday. Join us every day, or whenever you like.

Our RoundTable purposes are to open a space for daily reflection on our ideals, what we want to learn and create; to increase time for each of us to talk from about what we are thinking and learning now; and to be listened to by others, enjoying and learning with each other in a new way.

 Our format is:


  • We spend 5 minutes listening to short readings.

  • We then spend 50 minutes on individual reflections or learning reports, time distributed equally among all present (e.g. 26 people = about 2 minutes each).


 Our suggested topics for the first morning will be:


  1. "Linking this year’s theme, Governing the Anthropocene, to your specific field of expertise, what do you see as our greatest challenges and hopes?”   AND/OR

  2. "What situations and projects did you leave behind to come here, and what could happen here that would be valuable to you in your work and life back home?”



Each day, a different topic will be suggested by a different volunteering facilitator in attendance.

Folk wisdom and compelling research indicate that participants experience surprising benefits from this activity after about four sessions. Our own experience with this format has resulted in the following theory: Just as we break the sound barrier when we travel faster than the speed of sound, we break the communication barrier when we hear 25 authentic viewpoints in 50 minutes.

Looking forward to experiencing this with you all.



Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Thursday August 6, 2015 07:45 - 08:45
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

08:00

Registration
Registration is open from 8am - 6pm daily.

Thursday August 6, 2015 08:00 - 18:00
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
  • Host Organization ISSS

08:45

Keynote: Prof. Ockie Bosch and Dr Nam Nguyen - Capacity Building: Think2Impact
“The difficulty to establish systems education is evident in many institutions worldwide”
“…..is a highly complex task”
“There is a strong need to educate students who can deal with the complexities of integrating environmental, social, economic and business components associated with the development of sustainable management systems and the creation of new era leadership”
"There is a need for a new way of thinking in this complex and turbulent world we live…”
“… systems thinking needs to become mainstream in society”

These are only a few sentences in current literature.  Is a stronger emphasis and research on how to diffuse systems thinking in society – effective and continued capacity building -the answer?

Capacity building in systems thinking is a concept with wide implications for a variety of people. We talk about ‘Executive training programs’, formal university education, informal training and learning  – depending on the purpose of the capacity building. In all cases there is a need for a new way of thinking. Executive training programs address the need of managers and other decision makers to deal with the many problems they are facing that are embedded in a complex web of global issues that are all interconnected with each other.  There is a strong realisation that issues cannot be solved anymore with traditional single discipline and linear thinking mindsets. This realisation has also led to employers to increasingly require from new people entering the workforce to have the attributes/capacity to redesign in systems and sustainability terms. This requirement has become one of the biggest challenges for education in this century and creates a significant pedagogical dilemma in current university education that tends to be focused on discipline specific teaching which has no room for a wider systems approach.  It has become essential to develop innovative curriculum designs and learning environments that address academic paradigms as well as industry requirements. Then there are the many people in organisations, businesses, communities, government departments and other stakeholders who are not necessary at managerial or decision making levels, but who are (should be) involved in finding solutions  to every day complex problems. In their case there is also a need for a new way of thinking, but they do not require a deep knowledge of systems concepts and theories. Informal training provides these members of society with knowledge and an awareness of the basic principles of systems thinking and interconnectedness, how user-friendly systems tools can help them to unravel the complexities and how to identify leverage points in the system for interventions that would address the root causes of the problems, rather than treating the symptoms.

In this presentation the focus will be on:





  • A discussion of the need for and value of learning platforms for ETPs and recent progress on determining effective modes of delivery that would have a global reach;



  • Preliminary outcomes from the ‘reflection step” of the first two rounds of the cyclic process of an ELLab for systems education, which revealed that students have shifted their way of thinking significantly from limited understanding and linear thinking to more coherent and interconnected thinking;



  • How the use of Think2Impact as a global platform can fulfil our vision of educational institutions to be linked together for  sharing reflections and lessons learned with each other in order to move to new levels of performance and assist each other to diffuse  systems thinking into educational systems around the world; and



  • the importance of capacity building through informal training (provided in the ‘Learn’ platform of Think2Impact) and co-learning during the establishment and cyclic running of an ELLab, and the capturing of these learnings to be shared through “Access” platform of Think2Impact.




Speakers
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder ofThink2Impact Pty Ltd and in Australia. Dr Nguyen was a co-founder of the internationally linked Systems Design and Complexity Management (SDCM) Alliance at The... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author. | | I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College High Schools for low-income youth in Dayton, Ohio. | | I host a monthly event called Visual Thinkers Show and Tell that meets at OCAD University in... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 08:45 - 09:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:30

Keynote: Irma Wilson and Pamela Henning - A Call to Action for the Systems Sciences Community
Speakers
avatar for Pamela Buckle-Henning

Pamela Buckle-Henning

Assistant Professor, Management, Marketing & Decision Sciences, Adelphi University
Secretary and Vice President for Protocol, International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Pamela Buckle Henning She is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work.Pamela’s scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Irma Wilson

Irma Wilson

Founder, FutureSharp
Business unusual strategist, edge inhabiter and provocateur. | “Design thinking is core to how humanity innovate. And find it, we must. We’re talking species survival here, the Earth will be fine.” | Irma Wilson is a Collective Intelligence Strategist and Futurist who keeps a finger on the Social Innovation pulse.  She investigates the ways in which imagination and individual agency can be activated to create engaged global... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author. | | I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College High Schools for low-income youth in Dayton, Ohio. | | I host a monthly event called Visual Thinkers Show and Tell that meets at OCAD University in... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:30 - 10:15
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

10:15

Morning Break
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Thursday August 6, 2015 10:15 - 10:45
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

10:45

Keynote: Gabriele Harrer - Swiss Innovation Policies for a Viable National Innovation System Switzerland
Systemic Consulting: Practices

Speakers
avatar for Gabriele Harrer

Gabriele Harrer

Head Malik Competence Center Vester, Malik Management St.Gallen AG
Gabriele Harrer was long years project manager and scientific assistant to Prof. Frederic Vester, Member of the Club of Rome, in his "Studygroup for Biology and Environment, Munich.  She worked closely with Vester in his workshops, big system studies and projects and his books and exhibitions about Interconnected Systems & Systems Thinking. She contributed to the development of Vester’s computerized system modeling tools... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 11:15
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:15

Keynote: Dr Louis Klein - Systemic Consulting: Challenges
The invisible hand is not your friend. Following Scott’s principles of observation we may want to look for the challenges of systemic consulting on the detail levels of the issues of clients or the consulting practices themselves. We may want to explore alternative perspectives on consulting. However the presentation will be dedicated to the conditions for the possibility of systemic consulting and the bigger picture of western society. Here we find systemicity and individuation as the main barriers of systemic change practices. We need to go back to the dialectics of enlightenment to understand where the challenges are and why it is about time to engage in social design impact evaluation.

Speakers
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author. | | I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College High Schools for low-income youth in Dayton, Ohio. | | I host a monthly event called Visual Thinkers Show and Tell that meets at OCAD University in... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 11:15 - 11:45
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:45

Presentation and Panel Discussion: Systemic Change
Speakers
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Gandolfo Dominici

Prof. Gandolfo Dominici

Associate Professor and Chair of Marketing, University of Palermo
SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and IndustryGandolfo Domenici is a board member of the World Organisation for Systems and Cybernetics (WOSC) and of the Consorzio Universitario di Economia Industriale e Manageriale (CUEIM).  He is Associate Professor and Chair of Marketing at the Department SEAS, Polytecnic School of the University of Palermo (Italy). | Gandolfo is author of more than 55 published articles and... Read More →
avatar for Christiane Gebhardt

Christiane Gebhardt

Vice President Head Malik Global Initiatives, Malik Management Zentrum St. Gallen AG
Entrepreneurial and innovative senior operational, change and project management leader with over 20 years of global experience that includes successfully delivering high profile projects in national champion industries and the government sector. | | Expert German Innovation Policies  | High Tech Spinoffs / Innovation Strategies and Investment Advisory ServicesRoundtable: Smart Service World and Industry 4.0 @Acatech BerlinFraunhofer... Read More →
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →
avatar for Irma Wilson

Irma Wilson

Founder, FutureSharp
Business unusual strategist, edge inhabiter and provocateur. | “Design thinking is core to how humanity innovate. And find it, we must. We’re talking species survival here, the Earth will be fine.” | Irma Wilson is a Collective Intelligence Strategist and Futurist who keeps a finger on the Social Innovation pulse.  She investigates the ways in which imagination and individual agency can be activated to create engaged global... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 11:45 - 12:30
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

12:30

Lunch
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Thursday August 6, 2015 12:30 - 13:30
Delegate Choice Berlin, Germany

13:30

Application of the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) for Management of Laboratory Hazardous Wastes

Higher education institutions generate a significant amount of wastes in their laboratories. Toxic reagents can react to other chemicals and form unknown products which are dangerous to both human and environment. Despite the severity of the situation, these wastes are not always discarded properly due to either lack of awareness by students and employees or lack of follow-up inspection. As education institutions, the universities should be the best example of how to manage their wastes and therefore show concern about the environment. This work is aimed at applying the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) for management of hazardous wastes in a laboratory at the Federal University of Uberlândia, including their storage and disposal, in order to improve the awareness by those involved in scientific laboratory research about this issue.

Keywords: Reagents, hazardous wastes, SSM, laboratories.  


Presenter / Artist
PL

Prof. Lara Bartocci Liboni

Professor, University of Sao Paulo
ISSS One Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Elk Room Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Exploring Systems Thinking Approaches to Developing Action Research Guidelines in a Doctorate of Public Health Program

Based at the University of Illinois at Chicago,  the Doctorate of Public Health (DrPH) online program is focused on leadership for mid-career working professionals.  This is distance education, but with synchronous classes and individual attention intensive.  Many of our students are already in leadership positions, such as heading local public health departments, or working in key positions in federal and international agencies; we attempt to give them a broader, more systemic and flexible view of  research and actions they can both instigate and participate in, under an 'adaptive leadership' and action learning rather than a positional leadership approach, or an approach where research is separate from action. 'Systems thinking' is one of our core principles and competencies: We have been working on introducing and integrating systems approaches public health leaders are less familiar with, such as soft systems, into our curriculum. (They are more familiar with systems dynamics derived approaches, e.g. Donella Meadows and Peter Senge.)  The core faculty group has been re-working the curriculum to build student competency in methods of action research as an approach to the DrPH dissertation.  This has emerged from a strong student desire to frame their work as action research, and to emphasize research relevance as much as rigor. This has presented several challenges for us: 1) clarifying what action research 'is' (beyond action learning, which we introduce in our first year) as an approach to empirical inquiry in a leadership program, and how we might draw on diverse traditions of action research from other fields (e.g. education and anthropology);  2) how we frame action research for audiences more used to positivistic approaches to research, which includes not only many public health colleagues but our university's Institutional Review Board;  3) how to  draw boundaries around cycles of reflection and action in ongoing work, and delimit the dissertation project, to make the research achievable in a feasible time period; and 4) how to guide the students in building collaborative and participatory research relationships in an action research context.  Systems thinking based principles and approaches are useful in responding  to all these challenges, from serving as a core theory for building conceptual frameworks to structuring participation and communicating a feasible dissertation proposal.


Presenter / Artist
EP

Eve Pinsker

epinsker@uic.edu
ISSS Regular


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Innovating Research Methods to Understand Flexibility in Complex Projects

In this paper we discuss how when we innovate in the way we examine the nature of the relationships and combinations between the elements in equifinal and multifinal pathways, we can identify ways of making innovation projects more flexible and therefore more successful. To initiate a discussion on this topic we illustrate an example with a short vignette.

Academics and practitioners suggest that project failure is caused by rigid conventional project management methods that fail to capture the serendipitous, evolutionary and experimental nature of complex innovation projects. There is general agreement that innovative projects need to be ‘flexible’ to be successful. There is a general trend in research studies to focus on either flexible project planning and/or on flexible product specifications but there are but few suggestions that flexibility lies in the management of equifinal and multifinal processes taking a complexity perspective. Therefore, satisfactory explanations have been hindered by a weakness within project management methodologies to conceptualize complexity. In this chapter we will suggest methods that could enable researchers to investigate flexibility in equifinal and multifinal processes as well as ideas about how these methods could be embedded in current research practice.

Equifinality and multifinality are useful concepts to investigate multiple trajectories to reach goals. Equifinality occurs when "a system can reach the same final state, from different initial conditions and by a variety of different structures/processes paths." We can equate equifinality as the concept of convergence: Multifinality refers to designing a system (organization) where individual actors or its subsystems meet their own goals while the system as a whole also meets its goals. Attaining varied outcomes from parameters in an interconnected system is divergence. 

Both equifinality and multifinality are faculties of complex systems, and they both defy the definition of a precisely planned and meticulously implemented process completely controlled or predicted by initial conditions. For this reason their investigation in management generally and project management particularly has been put off – it is tied with the investigation of causal complexity within convergent/divergent project structures/processes, and this investigation has been hindered by the absence of complexity methods that suit social enquiry. We explain the reasons why complexity enquiry in project management is hindered. we define the elements of both equifinality and multifinality, based from a complexity perspective, to be: 

Equifinality = Convergence of pathways

Multifinality = Divergence of pathways

E/M pathway = initial conditions / regulation (from feedback) / contingency / outcome

In our vignette example, the determination of which pathways are optimal comes as a result of integrating regulatory mechanisms coming from feedback loops within the pathways. Regulation will not only show us multiple pathways but can also help to ensure that contingencies are controlled, and mechanisms are put in place to detect and address breakdowns. It is important to note that regulatory mechanisms, in general, can be extremely varied and irregular and for this reason configurational methods can be used to assess the optimal equifinal and multifinal pathways. It is the proposition in this study that the location of flexibility or the lack of it can be detected in the nature of the relationship between the elements in the equifinal/multifinal pathways. By this we mean that these elements are configured (combined in various relations) in a phenomenon called causal complexity within which their interdependence creates unique sequence of events. 


Presenter / Artist
MK

Maria Kapsali

Lecturer, University of Hull
ISSS Regular


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Principles of Redundancy

Robert Merton once commented, according to Margaret Mead, that after WW2, “there wasn’t a person in the country (U.S.A) who was thinking hard about problems who didn’t have a folder somewhere marked something like circular systems”. In the present age that folder might read ‘universal patterns’. Human obsession with pattern is not new. Patterns, cycles, periodicities and all manner of repetition have been observed and measured for an unknown period of time throughout human history. We find in nature isomorphic relationships of pattern across vast scales. Indeed, it holds true that pattern formation has cosmic ancestry. From galaxy formations to the tiny neuronal assemblages of brains, or the branching structures of river systems and trees, one cannot help but be nagged by persistent pattern resemblance.

Notoriously, theories of isomorphies have become unfashionable in systems theory circles.  One can speculate on the reason for this but without question they exert a toll on the faculties of the mind that seeks to wrestle such a hydra.  Len Troncale points out a rupture between the holistic, heuristic methodologies—of what might be called broadly, soft systems—and those of isomorphy based approaches. Where traditionally the former is a non-prescriptive, interactive learning based approach and the later offers deterministic potential yet little in the way of an applied approach. Nevertheless, the original goal of Systems thinking remains: elucidation of isomorphies, and thereafter, their application as a methodological tool to solve a problem of function in a real world system.

It was with this in mind that a novel theory—the Principles of Redundancy—was developed during my PhD to provide a tentative proposal capable of explaining system dynamics. This is a novel rendering of the concept ‘redundancy’ that subsumes our traditional explanations and explicates the idea as the basis for the theory. Five Principles are introduced with the aim of exploring the oft used, but rarely examined concepts: order, development, complexity, emergence and stability.

This inquiry resides in the discourse of natural philosophy. It is proposed that Redundancy is a phenomenon that gives rise to order and increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles to supra-social systems. Pattern and form are ineluctably tied into this inquiry and constitute the backbone of the Principles. A focus on non-equilibrium processes, evolution and information informs the discussion and conclusions. The natural condition of the universe is for increasing energy degradation in non-equilibrated cascades of dissipative structures that develop patterns and patterns of patterns.

Development of this idea emanates from what Gregory Bateson called an ‘ecology of mind’ or ‘ecology of ideas’. Whilst Bateson, and others that have subsequently run in his wake, are right to point out the ineffable beauty and mystery of the ecological world—how it is given by physics and chemistry, but is intrinsically not explainable in the same terms—there persists a question of the unity of nature. Shedding light on the nature of pattern and order are, in the words of Bateson, nontrivial. Present in any question about existence is the conundrum in nature between the continuity of change and the discontinuity of the classes which result from change. Explanation, or more acutely exploration, of this conundrum plainly does not lodge in the language of physics, chemistry, ecology or the social sciences. Yet each of the disciplines surely has many ingredients that can and must be used in establishing a new dish—a new epistemology.

 



Presenter / Artist

Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Towards Systems Thinking: Strengthening the Bonds Between Operations Research (OR) and Health Services Planning & Epidemiology

The study proposes a dialogical approach between OR and Health Services Planning and Epidemiology based on the similarities of their own epistemological experiences, according to Habermas’ Theory of Knowledge. As a field of application, health services planning and epidemiology are Complex Societal Problems (CSP), requiring multidisciplinary and multi-dimensional approach. The paper suggests an agenda towards systems thinking to enhance the interaction between the disciplines to guarantee the implementation research´ results by decision makers. Multi-methodology and concept maps tools deal with CSP and may consider peacefully the coexistence of different paradigms. Structuring the problems by concept maps accomplish the systems thinking approach, by presenting the context with diverse levels, feedback loops and dependencies. The map is a real board upon which actors and stakeholders exercise their communicative skills and define collaborative loops towards concepts, meanings and practical implementation.


Presenter / Artist
MS

Maria Stella Castro Lobo

Epidemiology Department / University Hospital, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
ISSS Dev


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30

Part II: Education for Anthropocene Governance
Continuation of Sunday Workshop. It is not necessary to have attended Sunday. All Welcome.

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Pavel Luksha

Pavel Luksha

Professor, pavel.luksha@gmail.com
Dr. Pavel Luksha said the following about Kinematic Self­Replicating Machines The book provides a relatively good review on theory of self­reproduction. I found the book a very comprehensive study on possible designs of kinematic self­replicators. One thing the book has successfully shown is that these designs, at least those theoretical, are vast. The book is without a doubt a compendium of projects for artificial... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Director of the Doctoral Program, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability |  Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director of the Doctoral Program in Technology Innovation and Management at ITBA, Argentina, President of Syntony Leadership, and former Director of... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 15:30
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Evolutionary Phases of the Emerging Consilience Organization

At the turn of the 21st century, new forms of organization with different essence are emerging across various sectors with the intertwined complicated problems in the global context. Such complicated problems embody both detailed complexity of order and dynamic complexity of Chaos. Dynamic vs. static state, close system vs. open system, and structural coupling with both nature and norm are prevalently observed in many organizations. While entropy and negentropy compose the two sides of organizational energy flow, we also see the coexistence of the negative feedback loops minimizing possibility space for higher performance and the positive feedback loops maximizing possibility space for renewal and allows greater innovation.

It is such co-existence, co-development and co-evolving organizational phenomenon that shape the unique culture of the emerging “Consilience Organization”. In a consilience organization, both hetero-organizing and self-organizing appear side by side, both bureaucrat and networks compose the operation structure, both whole (system-based) and parts (agent-based) have their role in organizational holarchy, both homogeneous and heterogeneous agents work together. Meanwhile, both self-interest value and other-interest value are allowed in consillience organization; and both rationality and unrationality, or bounded rationality is appreciated. The organizational espoused theory incorporates both modernism and postmodernism, or post post-modernism. In terms of organizational leadership, authority by law and contingency by situation are not contradictory; and both competition and cooperation are critical strategies. In regard with organizational change and transformation, first order cybernetics change is as important as second order cybernetics change; continuous change and discontinuous change occur at the same time. Other phenomenon in a consilience organization includes the co-existence of simple and complex organizational control, genotype and phenotype interaction rule, slow macro dynamics and fast micro dynamics. 

Since the emerging consilience organization might have the seemingly contradictory, yet co-existing and co-developing organizational embodiments, it is worthy of our further inquiry of its evolutionary phases. In the presentation, the author would propose a four- phased evolutionary process of a consilience organization, namely phase 1of becoming innovative, phase 2 of falling to chaos, phase 3 of getting better and phase 4 of turning rigid. Phase 1 and 3 are the intended consequences (or direct effects) of organizational activities; Phase 2 and 4 are the unintended consequences (or side effects) of organizational activities. From phase 1 to phase 2 and from phase 3 to phase 4 are the decline consequences (or desilience) of organizational activities; From phase 2 to phase 3 and from phase 4 to phase 1 are the growth consequences (or resilience) of organizational activities; the resilience from phase 2 to phase 3 need to stabilize and minimize the possibility space; the resilience from phase 4 to phase 1 need to unstabilize and maximize the possibility space.

The evolutionary phases of a consilience organization may not follow in the linear process. A consillence organization could survive from two kinds of desilience and make a great resilience. It could also take a new cycle of all of the 4 phases. Because the scale and strength are different from the first cycle, it needs a totally different skill of resilience, and we will name it re-resilience or consilience. In the re-resilience or consilience of the evolution phases of consilience organization, we could see the consilience organization evolve from low complexity to high complexity. It is expected that the evolution phases of consilience organization will be emerging as a new discipline of organizational, entrepreneurial, and social Innovation.

Key words: Consilience organization, Revolution phases, Desilience, Resilience, High complexity.


Presenter / Artist
KL

Kingkong Lin

PhD Student, holos.lin@msa.hinet.net
ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Sustainable Practices As Dynamic Capabilities using Soft System Methodology

Environmental concerns have increased the awareness of the limitations of the modern conception of nature and its disastrous consequences.  Corporate sustainability consists of ensuring long-term economic viability and, at the same time, contributing to the socio-economic development of communities, the health of the environment and the stability of society (Ethos, 2009). The concept of corporate sustainability involves sustainable economic growth that is aligned with social development and environmental conservation. Consequently, a new development strategy emerges embodying political, economic, social, technological, and environmental dimensions. This new paradigm of a sustainable development implies the need for profound changes in the current production systems, human society organisation, and utilisation of natural resources essential to human life and other living beings (Belico et. al, 2000).  Therefore, the paradigm of sustainability implies the need for changes in the current production systems, including human society organization and utilization of natural resources essential to human life and other living beings (Liboni; Cezarino, 2014).The aim of this paper is to analyze the development of changes in operations management towards sustainability using the Soft System Methodology. The results show that Balbo company, Brazilian sugarcane industry, has developed new ways to change and adapt in a disturbing environment was able to built dynamics capabilities.  SSM is a soft methodology, which was developed from the observation that not all problems and situations faced by corporations are of a precise nature (Martinelli and Ventura, 2006, p. 163). This systemic method was “designed to assist in the resolution of soft issues, which are of complex nature and involve many human elements” (Martinelli; Ventura, 2006, p.163).  Native branch and all the changes demanded by the company’s new business were the source of development of dynamic capacities and adaptation of the company, which shifted from a stable commodity market to a dynamic, increasing market of organic food products. In order to seek a more sustainable management model, the company has developed dynamic capacities within the economic sphere focusing on efficacy, reduction and reuse of solid wastes, and cogeneration of energy; within the social sphere, the rural workers are assisted with security and quality of life programs; and within the environmental sphere, the company, through the Cana Verde project, has environmental certifications and preserves protected areas by conciliating the respect for the environment with the production processes of all areas. 


Presenter / Artist
PL

Prof. Lara Bartocci Liboni

Professor, University of Sao Paulo
ISSS One Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Elk Room Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Systemic Project Practice: Integrating Agile and Conventional Project Management Perspectives

In light of the current increase of complexity in projects, project management is stuck in a pre-paradigmatic phase. More tools, concepts and methodologies abound without increasing the manageability of projects. Plenty of conventional and agile project management approaches exist that speak their own language and establish own perspectives on how to run projects. This paper claims that a systemic project practice is necessary to balance the individual approaches, contributing to a coherent and practical management approach. More of the same research, tools, concepts and methodologies do not lead anywhere. We can always provide bigger picures, more details or alternative perspectives. The systemic perspective brought forward in this paper provides a detailed understanding why remaining in separate project management discourses only increases complicatedness instead of practicality. Moving toward a systemic project practice means an integration of the existing approaches and more effective manageability of project complexity through reflective project management praxis.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Steve Raue

Steve Raue

Consortial Partner & Director of Operations, The Systemic Excellence Group
Steve Raue is an expert for change and project management as well as organisational ethnography. He has been part of SEgroup since 2011 and is its Director of Operations.Steve Raue studied cultural analysis at the University of Lund, in Sweden. In the German Association for Project Management he is engaged as co-founder of the special group on agile management. Steve Raue also pursues his doctorate in Cross-Cultural Complex Project Management... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Thrive Human Beings

The Human Being is a complete sustainable thrive subsystem that can self empower and take care of himself, if he is aware.

This project shows, through experience, you can transform yourself: heal, rejuvenate and empower oneself. We, human beings, are complete thrive entities. We are the owners of our divine tools that have within. When we learn how to use them, how to create energy, redirect and nourish on our own, we can heal and empowered ourselves.

This paper shows a few of the many ways we, human beings, can use our inner powerful energy for heal and empower ourselves. Is an inter and transdisciplinary work. 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Fabiana Crespo

Fabiana Crespo

Journalist, fabianacrespo@gmail.com
ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00

Using Critical Systems Thinking in Emancipatory Postgraduate Supervision

Post graduate study is a partnership between supervisor and student.  The nature of this relationship is mainly guided by the supervision approach followed by the supervisor. Identified approaches include: Functional supervision - where the issue is one of project management; Enculturation – where the student is encouraged to become a member of the disciplinary community; Critical thinking – where the student is encouraged to question and analyse their work; Emancipation – where the student is encouraged to question and develop themselves; and developing a quality relationship – where the student is enthused, inspired and cared for. It is argued in this paper that this list is not mutually exclusive but rather distinctive goals of supervision of post graduate students.

The aim of this paper is to present the structure of an action research project aimed at creating guidelines for emancipatory supervision using e-learning strategies.  The participatory action research (AR) method used in this study has five phases: diagnosis; action planning; action taking; evaluation of success; and specifying learning. This paper focusses on the diagnosis and action planning phases of the action research project.

According to the FMA model of action research developed by Peter Checkland, action research aims to develop a methodology (M) that is continuously refined through its application in an area of concern (A). The development of the methodology is guided by a framework of understanding (F).  The area of application for the AR project reported here is the supervision of dissertation based Master’s and PhD students in Information Systems at a South African university. The individual student’s studies are viewed as case studies. The methodology developed is a flexible process described by guidelines for guiding students to successful studies and development of scholars. The framework of understanding is critical systems thinking and constructivist education theory.

Critical systems heuristics developed by Werner Ulrich is used to guide the diagnosis process. Critical systems heuristics is used as a tool for participants to articulate their views on how supervision should be done and what the goals thereof should be. The paper presents findings from the diagnosis process representative of the student and supervisor views on their experiences of supervision. A total of ten students and supervisors took part in interpretive interviews. Interview questions were guided by critical systems heuristics and literature on constructivism. The qualitative data collected was analysed using interpretive content analysis.

From the findings of the interviews and results of a literature review a plan for taking action is developed to develop a flexible process described by guidelines for supervision of post graduate students. Since many post graduate students are part-time students the focus of the process of supervision should be done through electronic media.  It was therefore decided to investigate the applicability of  e-learning principles in this problem environment.

Although the implementation and evaluation of the guidelines and resulting process are outside the scope of the paper, reflection is done in terms of the FMA framework to focus on the applicability of the chosen framework of understanding for the development of a methodology to achieve the desired goals of post graduate supervision.


Presenter / Artist
AP

Assoc. Prof. Roelien Goede

Associate Professor, North-West University
ISSS Dev


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

A Moderating Role of the Sustainability in Lean Production Systems: A Longitudinal Case Study Analysis

Purpose – The puropse of this paper is to explore the extent to which principles of lean product development are applied to product design and engineering at production systems in Italian medium sized firms. “Lean thinking”, with its focus on the elimination of waste for the improvement of flow, and on continuous improvement has profoundly influenced many aspects of manufacturing, (Womack and Jones, 1996; León and Farris, 2011). The effectiveness improvements to be gained from a lean approach to manufacturing processes will, however, be limited by the development and engineering of the product. Much of the literature and research on lean product development (LPD) has looked at individual aspects for improvement of product design and development (PD&D) processes. This study inserts itself in the literature that compares the efficiency of individual performance evaluation.

With the problems associated with over-emphasising process control, ambidexterity appreciates a need to engage in exploratory learning to adequately adapt to environmental changes. Koskinen and Vanharanta (2002) for example, suggest that purposeful learning through explicit knowledge learnt through books and databases, and tacit knowledge gained through experience, may be particularly important in the initial stages of exploratory learning. Argyris (1977) similarly suggest that exploratory learning aids in ensuring that organisations address the needs of the customer more effectively rather than simply operating more efficiently. However, over expenditure on exploratory learning can result in the pursuit of flexibility at the expense of short-term profitability (Miles et al., 1978). To address this, it is necessary for firms to develop appropriate organisational processes and dynamic capabilities that support adaptation at a rate that reflects their operating environment (Eisenhardt and Martin, 2000). From a dynamic capabilities perspective, Anand et al. (2009) stated that without appropriate resources allocated to breakthrough process innovations, firms may have difficulties in sustaining improvements. In this study we give specific attention to project-level processes, emphasising the impact of the operating environment of each firm. Depending on a particular business environment, the ability of firms to engage in process innovation can have dramatic effects on firm performance, compared to firms with greater emphasis on cost based competition (Levinthal and March, 1993). 


Presenter / Artist
MR

Maria Rosaria Marcone

Researcher, Polytechnic University of Marche
ISSS One Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

A Strategy on How to Learn the Way We Build Our Own World

In this paper I make the arguments that I see supporting a view of how we, the observers, can come to know the world we live in.

Thus, the purpose of this paper is to design a strategy on how to learn to observe the observer’s process of observing.  I start from a position in second order cybernetics, which turns out to be a Radical Constructivist position. The Constructivism admits the subjectivity and includes the experience of observing and not just what is observed. The result of observation will depend of the interaction and experience of the observer himself. But, how can the observer be observed if there is no access to a world apart from him?

On the one hand, the conceptual and philosophical analysis of current theories of second-order cybernetics gives relevance to the theory of the observer and the relationship between the observer and what is observed. On the other hand, it suggests that self-organization, cognition, and the observer model the observing systems. An observing model system includes what von Foerster calls the description of “the one who describes’’.

In the description of the describer, this question arises: what are the properties of an observer? The paper proposes a strategy that uses the concept of game and game designing. The game is the constitutive element of a space of action wherein a world emerges. In this context, the games are a tool that articulates learning and the properties of the observer. 

In this way, in the gaming experience, each participant experience individually the way he/she builds his/her world. Such constitution involves the experience of the observer, and the relation between his language and his world.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Jose Bermeo

Jose Bermeo

Independent Research / Lecturer, Independent Research Professional / Los Andes University
Jose Bermeo studied Engineering at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. In 2001 he obtained his M.Sc. in Industrial Engineering at the University de los Andes (UA), Colombia. After that, in 2005, he was a Visiting Scholar at Oxford University at the Clarendon Institute, UK. During his PhD studies he worked in the Department of Industrial Engineering at UA as a Teaching Assistant. Later, in 2006, he was at the University of St. Gallen in... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Practical Value of the Systems-Based Evolutionary Learning Laboratory in Solving Complex Community Problems in Vietnam

This paper provides initial reflections on the practical value of the systems-based Evolutionary Learning Laboratory (ELLab) through a case study on improving the quality of life for women smallholder farmers in rural Haiphong, northern Vietnam. The ELLab framework comprises seven steps (issue identification, capacity building, systems modeling, identifying leverages for systemic interventions, management plans, implementation, and reflection).

The first five steps were implemented during 2013-2014 providing valuable results that have made both practical and theoretical contributions with substantial implications to community development.

By using systems approaches through the ELLab process, the project has identified the real challenges and needs of the target group. The “perceived” prominent issue (labour hardship) as assumed by the funding body was not identified as the most difficult hurdle for the women to overcome and was ranked second after poor income. The third factor determining their quality of life was health. The factors affecting these three determinants were found to be intrinsically interlinked with each other. The outcomes of this study served as feedback and a rationale for reframing the project goal and objectives to address the ‘real issues’, ‘real needs’ and thus appropriate systemic intervention strategies to address the identified challenges of the local women farmers. The findings have not only brought about practical solutions for the women (social impacts on gender equality and rural lives), but also formulated context-based recommendations for funding agencies and local governments.

This study has proven the ELLab to be a powerful framework in managing such complex problems in rural communities due to its multiple practical applications and values. The systems approach employed does not merely seek solutions to the perceived (visible) problems of the target group, but it provides an opportunity to explore the “bigger picture” of the context. Places of interventions can be defined to improve performance of the whole system (i.e. rural households and communities) rather than the traditional palliative approach.

As a generic framework, the ELLab enables a large degree of flexibility to employ other management tools to support analyses of emerging stakeholders during the implementation phase. This helps to engage the right stakeholders for understanding the context in more depth, serving as a basis for defining systemic interventions. The built-in user-friendly systems tools in the ELLab enable all stakeholders to understand different issues in relationships and to define systemic interventions, while impacts and possible unintended consequences could be envisaged through scenario testing. These are clearly more time and cost efficient than traditional problem solving approaches.

Moreover, the framework embraces a “bottom-up approach” and “true participation” since opinions of disadvantaged groups, local people and all other stakeholders are embedded in the systems models that reflect their actual issues, concerns and expectations. Drivers and barriers to their defined goals are fully explored in relationships. The framework ensures the “inclusiveness” of all stakeholders, a holistic view on hierarchical systems relationships and the different dimensions of sustainable development (i.e. economic, environmental, social and cultural). The “capacity building” component throughout the process warrants the ownership of the process and outcomes and thereby long-lasting impacts.

The ELLab creates a “co-learning environment” for all stakeholders. This was evident in this case study through triggering “transformative learning” amongst participants and thus appropriate actions of all the stakeholder groups (policy makers, government staff, agribusinesses and local farmers) towards strong collaboration and joint actions. Regular reflections and sharing of lessons and experience at both local and global levels through the online knowledge hub Think2ImpactTM (http://think2impact.org/) would continuously improve learning and performance around the world.

Contributions to organizational learning theory, and project knowledge and stakeholder management are also discussed as other evident values of the ELLab.

Keywords: Co-learning; Inclusiveness; Stakeholder; Systems thinking; Transformative learning; True participation. 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder ofThink2Impact Pty Ltd and in Australia. Dr Nguyen was a co-founder of the internationally linked Systems Design and Complexity Management (SDCM) Alliance at The... Read More →
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →
TM

Tuan Minh Ha

PhD Student, The University of Adelaide Business School
ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30

Yin/Yang Cancer Treatment System: A Fundamental Shift in Cancer Management
Yin/Yang Cancer Treatment System: A Fundamental Shift in Cancer Management

2453

FUNDAMENTAL SHIFT IN CANCER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM     

Elior L. Kinarthy, PhD

elior.kinarthy@gmail.com

www.cancer-vcrc.org

Better cancer screening and advances in various treatments have increased the survival rate of the majority of cancer patients to over five years. The purpose of this pilot case study is to demonstrate that with a restructured cancer management system the survival rate of a male patient with bone metastatic prostate cancer can potentially exceed 15 years. The fundamental shift in the cancer management begins from ground zero, a practical integration of western and eastern systems of treating cancer.

This 15 year case study uses Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman’s “System 1 and System 2” decision making process (Thinking, Fast and Slow, Doubleday, Canada, 2011). These systems of thinking can be used for adjusting the doctors’ orders to fit the patient’s needs. The goal is to select the most effective treatment management for that patient in an optimal support environment. The focus is the patient as a client participant. The method for treating cancer successfully requires new proactive rules of behaviour at home and at clinics and hospitals. The functional framework for treating cancer successfully requires adopting new roles of behaviour for the patient as a proactive client, the physician as an effective communicator and administrator of treatments, and the family, friends and the patients as a socio-emotive support group.

The effectiveness of the new system requires participation by all practitioners in a cancer client advocacy workshop run by a trained holistic case management technician that ensures that complementary treatments such as CBD (Cannabidiol), DCT (Dendritic Cell Therapy), hyperthermia, meditation, infusions, Proton radiation, green tea (Gyokuro), Ginger, Turmeric and others are considered, that there is a balance in the use of Allopathic, holistic, alternative and complementary treatments. All treatments must be “designed” for the patient-client taking into consideration age, culture, sex, emotional state, knowledge and expectation. The system must assure that the patient-client financial concerns don’t add additional stress and the place of residency is adequate while receiving treatments.

The success of this complex new system of cancer management depends on professional advocacy.  The advocacy must be a Yin-Yang balanced and harmonious symbiotic mix of western and eastern medicine, allopathic-holistic and traditional and complementary treatments.  This practical application of this conceptual model of treating cancer patients as cancer clients was based on a 15 year case study by a psychologist. The criterion  validity of this case study was established by examining the relationship between various traditional-complementary treatment modalities and their outcome as measured by blood tests, MRI, CT, PSA, Testosterone level and other bio-markers. Reliability has been established by repeated measurements. The results of this case study show that the patient as a participating client improved self-confidence, assertiveness, spirituality and prognosis. The new treatment model worked to effectively arrest cancer growth although some of the allopathic physicians disagreed with the changes in the treatment protocol initiated by the patient.

At the beginning of treatment a large tumour appeared in the prostate and metastasised to spinal lumbar vertebrae 10, 11, and 12. The prostate tumour was gone with 9 weeks of proton radiation treatment in California and extensive acupuncture to reduce pain, the metastasis was gone with 4 yearly dendritic and hyperthermia treatments in Cologne, Germany and the spinal bone tumour was removed surgically in Canada. Remission was demonstrated by successive MRI reports for the last 5 years. PSA reduction from 60 mg/mL to 0.01 mg/mL was shown by successive blood tests. It took 10 years to get to remission. Follow up tests shows no reoccurrence of cancer after 5 years.


Presenter / Artist
PE

Prof. Elior Kinarthy

Professor of Psychology, Rio Hondo College
ISSS Retired



Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Abstract Expression Capability with Empirical Experience

This is a paper that deals with the information and analysis obtained through an experimental experience called “grasping the clay”. In this personal experiment, on one hand, I gathered data as a resource and statistically analyzed it, and on the other hand, reconsidered the experience with this particular bodily act through the development with methods of autopoiesis, phenomenology, and cognitive science.

It’s a common understanding that each individual has one’s own unique way of experience. Even as we are living the same world, one could have a totally different perspective towards an experience than that of another. Based on this idea, I developed the subject matter of this thesis, focusing on my personal work that gives significant importance to “feeling”, to elucidate the facts of experience that cannot but refer only in ambiguous and complex terms. Therefore, I have considered the relationship between the body and consciousness by setting it clear that even in consciousness there is a “feeling” movement, which can be described as “double operation” in relation with the body feeling. In addition, I have noted that the process of “experience” is supported and formed by a vast memory. It begins from the way of the recognition of a thing called “first recognition and the re-recognition,” and further I have discussed the issues of language and image to be involved in the formation of experience which lead to the formation and changes in impression. It is argued that for the mental representation of the impression, “touch” has an ability to feel, and in reality, it is talked about as “intensity”. I would like to further present that feeling which is included within the above mentioned properties of intensity can be an indication for the preceding acts, thus may work as expectation, and which then leads to sympathy.

In addition, a state called “trust and relief” which formed by the memory of the feel, is closely related to the feeling experience.

In particular, I have explained that the spheres of experience that advance with body movement, and “a so and so feeling” that is perceived as the inner feel of the body, and that the memory and image that greatly influence the choice of action, and this leads to the accomplishment of performing the operation within the feeling. In addition, to those that are classified as feel, as long as sense of touch and its memory are involved, I have understood that since any feeling has a feature called “ignoring”, a variety of adjustment and control have been naturally imbibed from the facts which influence any information that is relevant. In this way, I have tried to discuss in detail about the memory and images as an element that leads to the experience of “grasping the clay,” which induces a sense of direction, and further, adjusting the speed and pressure to the body. Those elements that are formed in this context are the “experiential knowledge obtained through touch or feel,” which present a new sign to the formation of human knowledge that has been formed through visuals at its core, with higher functions, such as language and thinking.

Based on such points, the experiment of “grasping the clay” was conducted to gather views through the experience of each individual person and to relate them to the relationship with sense of touch and language. The following is the synthesis of the experiment. The impression of clay as its target tends to be considered as a metaphor or the similarity of the goods, an analogy, which also been involved in awareness of the subject of “first recognition and re-recognition”, and it is possible that the impression could vary by touching the clay directly under each case. And, I realized that the “pleasant or unpleasant” feelings are established by doing over the prehistory of the subject under the continuation of one’s behavior. Also there is a variation in the experience by the degree of intimacy, such as a nostalgic feeling, through the degree of action represented by the word, such as “a success or a failure,” while in contact with the subject. In the continuation of the experience, the above variations may lead to a shift in the ways of looking at the subject by different individuals. Also the change was observed among the relationship between “the quantity” and “the numbers.” However, under the performative experience, it operates naturally, and is gradually formed because it is already in the process and cannot be withdrawn with clear signs. In other words, here “grasping the clay” has been the subject of a kind of an aesthetic, and the productive experience. In this way, in the process of “grasping the clay”, one is involved in the experience of self-forming, through creating certain forms or shapes, that are closely related to the bodily senses. In particular, the material called “clay” is reflects in detail the movement and the inner workings of an individual. In an experience called “grasping of the clay”, each individual follows several questions that are repeated while holding the clay, and by this process, individual differences are studied. In addition to the problem of “first recognition” and “the re-recognition”, memory that has already been working, the short-term memory is mediated by a change in the feel and the changes through such a process. In this context, it is noted that there are individual differences in the appearance of some objects or material.

This paper discusses the possibilities of such a performative experience and the various elements for expanding the human experience through the results of the experiment of “grasping of the clay.” In particular, since the experiment involves a feeling experience, it not only explores possibilities of the experiences based on the data, but also develops a stream of arguments that could involve cognitive sciences. This paper deals by considering the results of the inner senses, the elements that are not apparent through emphasizing on the perception, could be further considered for more clear solutions with consideration between abstract capability and empirical experience.


Presenter / Artist
SL

Suehye Lee

ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00

Quality of Primary Care in Buenos Aires. An Analysis from the Complexity Approach

It was realized a Qualitative Case Study of exploratory / descriptive type. The objective was to  evaluate the performance of a municipal Primary Care Network in view of the Strategies for the Development of Teams of Primary Care, proposed by the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO, 2008), and based on the theoretical and methodological elements that offers the Theory of Social Systems of Luhmann (Luhmann N., 1998).

The specific objectives were, to analyze and describe the distinction between the system (Primary Care network) and the environment (hospitals, other sectors of the public politics and the community), by which the system constitutes itself; to describe the autopoiesis of the decisions (the mechanism by which the decisions are connected and generates other decisions and actions); to identify difficulties to displace the paradoxes associated to the decisions; and describe different types of noises in the communications and autolysis within the PC network.

Twenty in Depth Interviews were realized (a representative of each one of 17 Primary Care Centers, the Director of Primary Care, the Director of the municipal hospital and a government representative) and 2 Group Interviews. Documents Revision (that the interviewees offered spontaneously) and multiple Informal Conversations were secondary sources of information also used.

Centered on the processes of decision making, our approach allowed to make clear dimensions relative to the services that quality evaluation tools of more frequent use do not allow to capture, specially the not-linear nature of the relations between human beings. It proposes a rationality of different type to think of Primary Care Networks as complex systems, and offers a perspective from where observing, in an iterative way, the global behaviour of the system, the qualities of his constitutive parts (individual and institutional actors), the emergent phenomena of the interaction between them, and the relation of the system with other systems of his environment.

Keywords: Primary Care. Quality of Health Care. Complexity. Niklas Luhmann


Presenter / Artist
FJ

Francisco Javier López

MD, Fundación FEMEBA
ISSS Two Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany