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Registration open daily from 8am - 6pm.  Please join us for the #ISSS2015 #Roundtable at 7.45am each morning.

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Theme: Change; projects; consulting and capacity building [clear filter]
Thursday, August 6
 

07:45 CEST

RoundTable Discussion
Everyone is invited to the daily reflection RoundTable. We will meet every morning for an hour before the plenaries, Monday through Friday. Join us every day, or whenever you like.

Our RoundTable purposes are to open a space for daily reflection on our ideals, what we want to learn and create; to increase time for each of us to talk from about what we are thinking and learning now; and to be listened to by others, enjoying and learning with each other in a new way.

 Our format is:


  • We spend 5 minutes listening to short readings.

  • We then spend 50 minutes on individual reflections or learning reports, time distributed equally among all present (e.g. 26 people = about 2 minutes each).


 Our suggested topics for the first morning will be:


  1. "Linking this year’s theme, Governing the Anthropocene, to your specific field of expertise, what do you see as our greatest challenges and hopes?”   AND/OR

  2. "What situations and projects did you leave behind to come here, and what could happen here that would be valuable to you in your work and life back home?”



Each day, a different topic will be suggested by a different volunteering facilitator in attendance.

Folk wisdom and compelling research indicate that participants experience surprising benefits from this activity after about four sessions. Our own experience with this format has resulted in the following theory: Just as we break the sound barrier when we travel faster than the speed of sound, we break the communication barrier when we hear 25 authentic viewpoints in 50 minutes.

Looking forward to experiencing this with you all.



Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below)Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social... Read More →

Thursday August 6, 2015 07:45 - 08:45 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

08:45 CEST

Keynote: Prof. Ockie Bosch and Dr Nam Nguyen - Capacity Building: Think2Impact
“The difficulty to establish systems education is evident in many institutions worldwide”
“…..is a highly complex task”
“There is a strong need to educate students who can deal with the complexities of integrating environmental, social, economic and business components associated with the development of sustainable management systems and the creation of new era leadership”
"There is a need for a new way of thinking in this complex and turbulent world we live…”
“… systems thinking needs to become mainstream in society”

These are only a few sentences in current literature.  Is a stronger emphasis and research on how to diffuse systems thinking in society – effective and continued capacity building -the answer?

Capacity building in systems thinking is a concept with wide implications for a variety of people. We talk about ‘Executive training programs’, formal university education, informal training and learning  – depending on the purpose of the capacity building. In all cases there is a need for a new way of thinking. Executive training programs address the need of managers and other decision makers to deal with the many problems they are facing that are embedded in a complex web of global issues that are all interconnected with each other.  There is a strong realisation that issues cannot be solved anymore with traditional single discipline and linear thinking mindsets. This realisation has also led to employers to increasingly require from new people entering the workforce to have the attributes/capacity to redesign in systems and sustainability terms. This requirement has become one of the biggest challenges for education in this century and creates a significant pedagogical dilemma in current university education that tends to be focused on discipline specific teaching which has no room for a wider systems approach.  It has become essential to develop innovative curriculum designs and learning environments that address academic paradigms as well as industry requirements. Then there are the many people in organisations, businesses, communities, government departments and other stakeholders who are not necessary at managerial or decision making levels, but who are (should be) involved in finding solutions  to every day complex problems. In their case there is also a need for a new way of thinking, but they do not require a deep knowledge of systems concepts and theories. Informal training provides these members of society with knowledge and an awareness of the basic principles of systems thinking and interconnectedness, how user-friendly systems tools can help them to unravel the complexities and how to identify leverage points in the system for interventions that would address the root causes of the problems, rather than treating the symptoms.

In this presentation the focus will be on:





  • A discussion of the need for and value of learning platforms for ETPs and recent progress on determining effective modes of delivery that would have a global reach;



  • Preliminary outcomes from the ‘reflection step” of the first two rounds of the cyclic process of an ELLab for systems education, which revealed that students have shifted their way of thinking significantly from limited understanding and linear thinking to more coherent and interconnected thinking;



  • How the use of Think2Impact as a global platform can fulfil our vision of educational institutions to be linked together for  sharing reflections and lessons learned with each other in order to move to new levels of performance and assist each other to diffuse  systems thinking into educational systems around the world; and



  • the importance of capacity building through informal training (provided in the ‘Learn’ platform of Think2Impact) and co-learning during the establishment and cyclic running of an ELLab, and the capturing of these learnings to be shared through “Access” platform of Think2Impact.




Speakers
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author.I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 08:45 - 09:30 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:30 CEST

Keynote: Irma Wilson and Pamela Henning - A Call to Action for the Systems Sciences Community
Speakers
avatar for Pamela Buckle

Pamela Buckle

SIG Chair: Systems and Mental Health, Adelphi University
Secretary and Vice President for Protocol, International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Systems and Mental Health (see below for more information)Pamela Buckle Henning She is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi... Read More →
avatar for Irma Wilson

Irma Wilson

Founder, FutureSharp
Business unusual strategist, edge inhabiter and provocateur.“Design thinking is core to how humanity innovate. And find it, we must. We’re talking species survival here, the Earth will be fine.”Irma Wilson is a Collective Intelligence Strategist and Futurist who keeps a finger... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author.I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 09:30 - 10:15 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

10:45 CEST

Keynote: Gabriele Harrer - Swiss Innovation Policies for a Viable National Innovation System Switzerland
Systemic Consulting: Practices

Speakers
avatar for Gabriele Harrer

Gabriele Harrer

Head Malik Competence Center Vester, Malik Management St.Gallen AG
Gabriele Harrer was long years project manager and scientific assistant to Prof. Frederic Vester, Member of the Club of Rome, in his "Studygroup for Biology and Environment, Munich.  She worked closely with Vester in his workshops, big system studies and projects and his books and... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 10:45 - 11:15 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:15 CEST

Keynote: Dr Louis Klein - Systemic Consulting: Challenges
The invisible hand is not your friend. Following Scott’s principles of observation we may want to look for the challenges of systemic consulting on the detail levels of the issues of clients or the consulting practices themselves. We may want to explore alternative perspectives on consulting. However the presentation will be dedicated to the conditions for the possibility of systemic consulting and the bigger picture of western society. Here we find systemicity and individuation as the main barriers of systemic change practices. We need to go back to the dialectics of enlightenment to understand where the challenges are and why it is about time to engage in social design impact evaluation.

Speakers
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author.I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 11:15 - 11:45 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:45 CEST

Presentation and Panel Discussion: Systemic Change
Speakers
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Gandolfo Dominici

Prof. Gandolfo Dominici

Associate Professor and Chair of Marketing, University of Palermo
SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and IndustryGandolfo Domenici is a board member of the World Organisation for Systems and Cybernetics (WOSC) and of the Consorzio Universitario di Economia Industriale e Manageriale (CUEIM).  He is Associate Professor and Chair of... Read More →
avatar for Mrs. Christiane Gebhardt

Mrs. Christiane Gebhardt

Sr. Project Manager, Malik Institute
Entrepreneurial and innovative senior operational, change and project management leader with over 20 years of global experience that includes successfully delivering high profile projects in national champion industries and the government sector.Expert German Innovation Policies... Read More →
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →
avatar for Irma Wilson

Irma Wilson

Founder, FutureSharp
Business unusual strategist, edge inhabiter and provocateur.“Design thinking is core to how humanity innovate. And find it, we must. We’re talking species survival here, the Earth will be fine.”Irma Wilson is a Collective Intelligence Strategist and Futurist who keeps a finger... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 11:45 - 12:30 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Exploring Systems Thinking Approaches to Developing Action Research Guidelines in a Doctorate of Public Health Program

Based at the University of Illinois at Chicago,  the Doctorate of Public Health (DrPH) online program is focused on leadership for mid-career working professionals.  This is distance education, but with synchronous classes and individual attention intensive.  Many of our students are already in leadership positions, such as heading local public health departments, or working in key positions in federal and international agencies; we attempt to give them a broader, more systemic and flexible view of  research and actions they can both instigate and participate in, under an 'adaptive leadership' and action learning rather than a positional leadership approach, or an approach where research is separate from action. 'Systems thinking' is one of our core principles and competencies: We have been working on introducing and integrating systems approaches public health leaders are less familiar with, such as soft systems, into our curriculum. (They are more familiar with systems dynamics derived approaches, e.g. Donella Meadows and Peter Senge.)  The core faculty group has been re-working the curriculum to build student competency in methods of action research as an approach to the DrPH dissertation.  This has emerged from a strong student desire to frame their work as action research, and to emphasize research relevance as much as rigor. This has presented several challenges for us: 1) clarifying what action research 'is' (beyond action learning, which we introduce in our first year) as an approach to empirical inquiry in a leadership program, and how we might draw on diverse traditions of action research from other fields (e.g. education and anthropology);  2) how we frame action research for audiences more used to positivistic approaches to research, which includes not only many public health colleagues but our university's Institutional Review Board;  3) how to  draw boundaries around cycles of reflection and action in ongoing work, and delimit the dissertation project, to make the research achievable in a feasible time period; and 4) how to guide the students in building collaborative and participatory research relationships in an action research context.  Systems thinking based principles and approaches are useful in responding  to all these challenges, from serving as a core theory for building conceptual frameworks to structuring participation and communicating a feasible dissertation proposal.


Presenter / Artist
EP

Eve Pinsker

epinsker@uic.edu, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health
ISSS Regular


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Innovating Research Methods to Understand Flexibility in Complex Projects

In this paper we discuss how when we innovate in the way we examine the nature of the relationships and combinations between the elements in equifinal and multifinal pathways, we can identify ways of making innovation projects more flexible and therefore more successful. To initiate a discussion on this topic we illustrate an example with a short vignette.

Academics and practitioners suggest that project failure is caused by rigid conventional project management methods that fail to capture the serendipitous, evolutionary and experimental nature of complex innovation projects. There is general agreement that innovative projects need to be ‘flexible’ to be successful. There is a general trend in research studies to focus on either flexible project planning and/or on flexible product specifications but there are but few suggestions that flexibility lies in the management of equifinal and multifinal processes taking a complexity perspective. Therefore, satisfactory explanations have been hindered by a weakness within project management methodologies to conceptualize complexity. In this chapter we will suggest methods that could enable researchers to investigate flexibility in equifinal and multifinal processes as well as ideas about how these methods could be embedded in current research practice.

Equifinality and multifinality are useful concepts to investigate multiple trajectories to reach goals. Equifinality occurs when "a system can reach the same final state, from different initial conditions and by a variety of different structures/processes paths." We can equate equifinality as the concept of convergence: Multifinality refers to designing a system (organization) where individual actors or its subsystems meet their own goals while the system as a whole also meets its goals. Attaining varied outcomes from parameters in an interconnected system is divergence. 

Both equifinality and multifinality are faculties of complex systems, and they both defy the definition of a precisely planned and meticulously implemented process completely controlled or predicted by initial conditions. For this reason their investigation in management generally and project management particularly has been put off – it is tied with the investigation of causal complexity within convergent/divergent project structures/processes, and this investigation has been hindered by the absence of complexity methods that suit social enquiry. We explain the reasons why complexity enquiry in project management is hindered. we define the elements of both equifinality and multifinality, based from a complexity perspective, to be: 

Equifinality = Convergence of pathways

Multifinality = Divergence of pathways

E/M pathway = initial conditions / regulation (from feedback) / contingency / outcome

In our vignette example, the determination of which pathways are optimal comes as a result of integrating regulatory mechanisms coming from feedback loops within the pathways. Regulation will not only show us multiple pathways but can also help to ensure that contingencies are controlled, and mechanisms are put in place to detect and address breakdowns. It is important to note that regulatory mechanisms, in general, can be extremely varied and irregular and for this reason configurational methods can be used to assess the optimal equifinal and multifinal pathways. It is the proposition in this study that the location of flexibility or the lack of it can be detected in the nature of the relationship between the elements in the equifinal/multifinal pathways. By this we mean that these elements are configured (combined in various relations) in a phenomenon called causal complexity within which their interdependence creates unique sequence of events. 


Presenter / Artist
MK

Maria Kapsali

Lecturer, University of Hull
ISSS Regular


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Principles of Redundancy

Robert Merton once commented, according to Margaret Mead, that after WW2, “there wasn’t a person in the country (U.S.A) who was thinking hard about problems who didn’t have a folder somewhere marked something like circular systems”. In the present age that folder might read ‘universal patterns’. Human obsession with pattern is not new. Patterns, cycles, periodicities and all manner of repetition have been observed and measured for an unknown period of time throughout human history. We find in nature isomorphic relationships of pattern across vast scales. Indeed, it holds true that pattern formation has cosmic ancestry. From galaxy formations to the tiny neuronal assemblages of brains, or the branching structures of river systems and trees, one cannot help but be nagged by persistent pattern resemblance.

Notoriously, theories of isomorphies have become unfashionable in systems theory circles.  One can speculate on the reason for this but without question they exert a toll on the faculties of the mind that seeks to wrestle such a hydra.  Len Troncale points out a rupture between the holistic, heuristic methodologies—of what might be called broadly, soft systems—and those of isomorphy based approaches. Where traditionally the former is a non-prescriptive, interactive learning based approach and the later offers deterministic potential yet little in the way of an applied approach. Nevertheless, the original goal of Systems thinking remains: elucidation of isomorphies, and thereafter, their application as a methodological tool to solve a problem of function in a real world system.

It was with this in mind that a novel theory—the Principles of Redundancy—was developed during my PhD to provide a tentative proposal capable of explaining system dynamics. This is a novel rendering of the concept ‘redundancy’ that subsumes our traditional explanations and explicates the idea as the basis for the theory. Five Principles are introduced with the aim of exploring the oft used, but rarely examined concepts: order, development, complexity, emergence and stability.

This inquiry resides in the discourse of natural philosophy. It is proposed that Redundancy is a phenomenon that gives rise to order and increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles to supra-social systems. Pattern and form are ineluctably tied into this inquiry and constitute the backbone of the Principles. A focus on non-equilibrium processes, evolution and information informs the discussion and conclusions. The natural condition of the universe is for increasing energy degradation in non-equilibrated cascades of dissipative structures that develop patterns and patterns of patterns.

Development of this idea emanates from what Gregory Bateson called an ‘ecology of mind’ or ‘ecology of ideas’. Whilst Bateson, and others that have subsequently run in his wake, are right to point out the ineffable beauty and mystery of the ecological world—how it is given by physics and chemistry, but is intrinsically not explainable in the same terms—there persists a question of the unity of nature. Shedding light on the nature of pattern and order are, in the words of Bateson, nontrivial. Present in any question about existence is the conundrum in nature between the continuity of change and the discontinuity of the classes which result from change. Explanation, or more acutely exploration, of this conundrum plainly does not lodge in the language of physics, chemistry, ecology or the social sciences. Yet each of the disciplines surely has many ingredients that can and must be used in establishing a new dish—a new epistemology.

 



Presenter / Artist

Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Towards Systems Thinking: Strengthening the Bonds Between Operations Research (OR) and Health Services Planning & Epidemiology

The study proposes a dialogical approach between OR and Health Services Planning and Epidemiology based on the similarities of their own epistemological experiences, according to Habermas’ Theory of Knowledge. As a field of application, health services planning and epidemiology are Complex Societal Problems (CSP), requiring multidisciplinary and multi-dimensional approach. The paper suggests an agenda towards systems thinking to enhance the interaction between the disciplines to guarantee the implementation research´ results by decision makers. Multi-methodology and concept maps tools deal with CSP and may consider peacefully the coexistence of different paradigms. Structuring the problems by concept maps accomplish the systems thinking approach, by presenting the context with diverse levels, feedback loops and dependencies. The map is a real board upon which actors and stakeholders exercise their communicative skills and define collaborative loops towards concepts, meanings and practical implementation.


Presenter / Artist
MS

Maria Stella Castro Lobo

Physician, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro/ University Hospital
ISSS Dev


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Part II: Education for Anthropocene Governance
Continuation of Sunday Workshop. It is not necessary to have attended Sunday. All Welcome.

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Pavel Luksha

Pavel Luksha

pavel.luksha@gmail.com, SKOLKOVO School of Management / Global Education Futures
Dr. Pavel Luksha said the following about Kinematic Self­Replicating Machines The book provides a relatively good review on theory of self­reproduction. I found the book a very comprehensive study on possible designs of kinematic self­replicators. One thing the book has successfully... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

SIG Chair: Leadership and Systemic Innovation, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 13:30 - 15:30 CEST
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Evolutionary Phases of the Emerging Consilience Organization

At the turn of the 21st century, new forms of organization with different essence are emerging across various sectors with the intertwined complicated problems in the global context. Such complicated problems embody both detailed complexity of order and dynamic complexity of Chaos. Dynamic vs. static state, close system vs. open system, and structural coupling with both nature and norm are prevalently observed in many organizations. While entropy and negentropy compose the two sides of organizational energy flow, we also see the coexistence of the negative feedback loops minimizing possibility space for higher performance and the positive feedback loops maximizing possibility space for renewal and allows greater innovation.

It is such co-existence, co-development and co-evolving organizational phenomenon that shape the unique culture of the emerging “Consilience Organization”. In a consilience organization, both hetero-organizing and self-organizing appear side by side, both bureaucrat and networks compose the operation structure, both whole (system-based) and parts (agent-based) have their role in organizational holarchy, both homogeneous and heterogeneous agents work together. Meanwhile, both self-interest value and other-interest value are allowed in consillience organization; and both rationality and unrationality, or bounded rationality is appreciated. The organizational espoused theory incorporates both modernism and postmodernism, or post post-modernism. In terms of organizational leadership, authority by law and contingency by situation are not contradictory; and both competition and cooperation are critical strategies. In regard with organizational change and transformation, first order cybernetics change is as important as second order cybernetics change; continuous change and discontinuous change occur at the same time. Other phenomenon in a consilience organization includes the co-existence of simple and complex organizational control, genotype and phenotype interaction rule, slow macro dynamics and fast micro dynamics. 

Since the emerging consilience organization might have the seemingly contradictory, yet co-existing and co-developing organizational embodiments, it is worthy of our further inquiry of its evolutionary phases. In the presentation, the author would propose a four- phased evolutionary process of a consilience organization, namely phase 1of becoming innovative, phase 2 of falling to chaos, phase 3 of getting better and phase 4 of turning rigid. Phase 1 and 3 are the intended consequences (or direct effects) of organizational activities; Phase 2 and 4 are the unintended consequences (or side effects) of organizational activities. From phase 1 to phase 2 and from phase 3 to phase 4 are the decline consequences (or desilience) of organizational activities; From phase 2 to phase 3 and from phase 4 to phase 1 are the growth consequences (or resilience) of organizational activities; the resilience from phase 2 to phase 3 need to stabilize and minimize the possibility space; the resilience from phase 4 to phase 1 need to unstabilize and maximize the possibility space.

The evolutionary phases of a consilience organization may not follow in the linear process. A consillence organization could survive from two kinds of desilience and make a great resilience. It could also take a new cycle of all of the 4 phases. Because the scale and strength are different from the first cycle, it needs a totally different skill of resilience, and we will name it re-resilience or consilience. In the re-resilience or consilience of the evolution phases of consilience organization, we could see the consilience organization evolve from low complexity to high complexity. It is expected that the evolution phases of consilience organization will be emerging as a new discipline of organizational, entrepreneurial, and social Innovation.

Key words: Consilience organization, Revolution phases, Desilience, Resilience, High complexity.


Presenter / Artist

Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Systemic Project Practice: Integrating Agile and Conventional Project Management Perspectives

In light of the current increase of complexity in projects, project management is stuck in a pre-paradigmatic phase. More tools, concepts and methodologies abound without increasing the manageability of projects. Plenty of conventional and agile project management approaches exist that speak their own language and establish own perspectives on how to run projects. This paper claims that a systemic project practice is necessary to balance the individual approaches, contributing to a coherent and practical management approach. More of the same research, tools, concepts and methodologies do not lead anywhere. We can always provide bigger picures, more details or alternative perspectives. The systemic perspective brought forward in this paper provides a detailed understanding why remaining in separate project management discourses only increases complicatedness instead of practicality. Moving toward a systemic project practice means an integration of the existing approaches and more effective manageability of project complexity through reflective project management praxis.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Steve Raue

Steve Raue

Consortial Partner & Director of Operations, The Systemic Excellence Group
Steve Raue is an expert for change and project management as well as organisational ethnography. He has been part of SEgroup since 2011 and is its Director of Operations.Steve Raue studied cultural analysis at the University of Lund, in Sweden. In the German Association for Project... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Thrive Human Beings

The Human Being is a complete sustainable thrive subsystem that can self empower and take care of himself, if he is aware.

This project shows, through experience, you can transform yourself: heal, rejuvenate and empower oneself. We, human beings, are complete thrive entities. We are the owners of our divine tools that have within. When we learn how to use them, how to create energy, redirect and nourish on our own, we can heal and empowered ourselves.

This paper shows a few of the many ways we, human beings, can use our inner powerful energy for heal and empower ourselves. Is an inter and transdisciplinary work. 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Fabiana Crespo

Fabiana Crespo

Journalist, fabianacrespo@gmail.com
ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Using Critical Systems Thinking in Emancipatory Postgraduate Supervision

Post graduate study is a partnership between supervisor and student.  The nature of this relationship is mainly guided by the supervision approach followed by the supervisor. Identified approaches include: Functional supervision - where the issue is one of project management; Enculturation – where the student is encouraged to become a member of the disciplinary community; Critical thinking – where the student is encouraged to question and analyse their work; Emancipation – where the student is encouraged to question and develop themselves; and developing a quality relationship – where the student is enthused, inspired and cared for. It is argued in this paper that this list is not mutually exclusive but rather distinctive goals of supervision of post graduate students.

The aim of this paper is to present the structure of an action research project aimed at creating guidelines for emancipatory supervision using e-learning strategies.  The participatory action research (AR) method used in this study has five phases: diagnosis; action planning; action taking; evaluation of success; and specifying learning. This paper focusses on the diagnosis and action planning phases of the action research project.

According to the FMA model of action research developed by Peter Checkland, action research aims to develop a methodology (M) that is continuously refined through its application in an area of concern (A). The development of the methodology is guided by a framework of understanding (F).  The area of application for the AR project reported here is the supervision of dissertation based Master’s and PhD students in Information Systems at a South African university. The individual student’s studies are viewed as case studies. The methodology developed is a flexible process described by guidelines for guiding students to successful studies and development of scholars. The framework of understanding is critical systems thinking and constructivist education theory.

Critical systems heuristics developed by Werner Ulrich is used to guide the diagnosis process. Critical systems heuristics is used as a tool for participants to articulate their views on how supervision should be done and what the goals thereof should be. The paper presents findings from the diagnosis process representative of the student and supervisor views on their experiences of supervision. A total of ten students and supervisors took part in interpretive interviews. Interview questions were guided by critical systems heuristics and literature on constructivism. The qualitative data collected was analysed using interpretive content analysis.

From the findings of the interviews and results of a literature review a plan for taking action is developed to develop a flexible process described by guidelines for supervision of post graduate students. Since many post graduate students are part-time students the focus of the process of supervision should be done through electronic media.  It was therefore decided to investigate the applicability of  e-learning principles in this problem environment.

Although the implementation and evaluation of the guidelines and resulting process are outside the scope of the paper, reflection is done in terms of the FMA framework to focus on the applicability of the chosen framework of understanding for the development of a methodology to achieve the desired goals of post graduate supervision.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Roelien Goede

Roelien Goede

SIG Chair Action Research, North West University South Africa, Potchefstroom
I stay in Potchefstroom, South Africa, it is about 90 min drive South-West of Johannesburg. I'm an associate professor in Computer Science and Information Systems. I have a passion for teaching and my formal training is in Computer Science. I teach advanced programming techniques... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

A Moderating Role of the Sustainability in Lean Production Systems: A Longitudinal Case Study Analysis

Purpose – The puropse of this paper is to explore the extent to which principles of lean product development are applied to product design and engineering at production systems in Italian medium sized firms. “Lean thinking”, with its focus on the elimination of waste for the improvement of flow, and on continuous improvement has profoundly influenced many aspects of manufacturing, (Womack and Jones, 1996; León and Farris, 2011). The effectiveness improvements to be gained from a lean approach to manufacturing processes will, however, be limited by the development and engineering of the product. Much of the literature and research on lean product development (LPD) has looked at individual aspects for improvement of product design and development (PD&D) processes. This study inserts itself in the literature that compares the efficiency of individual performance evaluation.

With the problems associated with over-emphasising process control, ambidexterity appreciates a need to engage in exploratory learning to adequately adapt to environmental changes. Koskinen and Vanharanta (2002) for example, suggest that purposeful learning through explicit knowledge learnt through books and databases, and tacit knowledge gained through experience, may be particularly important in the initial stages of exploratory learning. Argyris (1977) similarly suggest that exploratory learning aids in ensuring that organisations address the needs of the customer more effectively rather than simply operating more efficiently. However, over expenditure on exploratory learning can result in the pursuit of flexibility at the expense of short-term profitability (Miles et al., 1978). To address this, it is necessary for firms to develop appropriate organisational processes and dynamic capabilities that support adaptation at a rate that reflects their operating environment (Eisenhardt and Martin, 2000). From a dynamic capabilities perspective, Anand et al. (2009) stated that without appropriate resources allocated to breakthrough process innovations, firms may have difficulties in sustaining improvements. In this study we give specific attention to project-level processes, emphasising the impact of the operating environment of each firm. Depending on a particular business environment, the ability of firms to engage in process innovation can have dramatic effects on firm performance, compared to firms with greater emphasis on cost based competition (Levinthal and March, 1993). 


Presenter / Artist
MR

Maria Rosaria Marcone

Researcher, Polytechnic University of Marche
ISSS One Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

A Strategy on How to Learn the Way We Build Our Own World

In this paper I make the arguments that I see supporting a view of how we, the observers, can come to know the world we live in.

Thus, the purpose of this paper is to design a strategy on how to learn to observe the observer’s process of observing.  I start from a position in second order cybernetics, which turns out to be a Radical Constructivist position. The Constructivism admits the subjectivity and includes the experience of observing and not just what is observed. The result of observation will depend of the interaction and experience of the observer himself. But, how can the observer be observed if there is no access to a world apart from him?

On the one hand, the conceptual and philosophical analysis of current theories of second-order cybernetics gives relevance to the theory of the observer and the relationship between the observer and what is observed. On the other hand, it suggests that self-organization, cognition, and the observer model the observing systems. An observing model system includes what von Foerster calls the description of “the one who describes’’.

In the description of the describer, this question arises: what are the properties of an observer? The paper proposes a strategy that uses the concept of game and game designing. The game is the constitutive element of a space of action wherein a world emerges. In this context, the games are a tool that articulates learning and the properties of the observer. 

In this way, in the gaming experience, each participant experience individually the way he/she builds his/her world. Such constitution involves the experience of the observer, and the relation between his language and his world.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Jose Bermeo

Jose Bermeo

Independent Research / Lecturer, Independent Research Professional / Los Andes University
Jose Bermeo studied Engineering at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. In 2001 he obtained his M.Sc. in Industrial Engineering at the University de los Andes (UA), Colombia. After that, in 2005, he was a Visiting Scholar at Oxford University at the Clarendon Institute, UK. During... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Practical Value of the Systems-Based Evolutionary Learning Laboratory in Solving Complex Community Problems in Vietnam

This paper provides initial reflections on the practical value of the systems-based Evolutionary Learning Laboratory (ELLab) through a case study on improving the quality of life for women smallholder farmers in rural Haiphong, northern Vietnam. The ELLab framework comprises seven steps (issue identification, capacity building, systems modeling, identifying leverages for systemic interventions, management plans, implementation, and reflection).

The first five steps were implemented during 2013-2014 providing valuable results that have made both practical and theoretical contributions with substantial implications to community development.

By using systems approaches through the ELLab process, the project has identified the real challenges and needs of the target group. The “perceived” prominent issue (labour hardship) as assumed by the funding body was not identified as the most difficult hurdle for the women to overcome and was ranked second after poor income. The third factor determining their quality of life was health. The factors affecting these three determinants were found to be intrinsically interlinked with each other. The outcomes of this study served as feedback and a rationale for reframing the project goal and objectives to address the ‘real issues’, ‘real needs’ and thus appropriate systemic intervention strategies to address the identified challenges of the local women farmers. The findings have not only brought about practical solutions for the women (social impacts on gender equality and rural lives), but also formulated context-based recommendations for funding agencies and local governments.

This study has proven the ELLab to be a powerful framework in managing such complex problems in rural communities due to its multiple practical applications and values. The systems approach employed does not merely seek solutions to the perceived (visible) problems of the target group, but it provides an opportunity to explore the “bigger picture” of the context. Places of interventions can be defined to improve performance of the whole system (i.e. rural households and communities) rather than the traditional palliative approach.

As a generic framework, the ELLab enables a large degree of flexibility to employ other management tools to support analyses of emerging stakeholders during the implementation phase. This helps to engage the right stakeholders for understanding the context in more depth, serving as a basis for defining systemic interventions. The built-in user-friendly systems tools in the ELLab enable all stakeholders to understand different issues in relationships and to define systemic interventions, while impacts and possible unintended consequences could be envisaged through scenario testing. These are clearly more time and cost efficient than traditional problem solving approaches.

Moreover, the framework embraces a “bottom-up approach” and “true participation” since opinions of disadvantaged groups, local people and all other stakeholders are embedded in the systems models that reflect their actual issues, concerns and expectations. Drivers and barriers to their defined goals are fully explored in relationships. The framework ensures the “inclusiveness” of all stakeholders, a holistic view on hierarchical systems relationships and the different dimensions of sustainable development (i.e. economic, environmental, social and cultural). The “capacity building” component throughout the process warrants the ownership of the process and outcomes and thereby long-lasting impacts.

The ELLab creates a “co-learning environment” for all stakeholders. This was evident in this case study through triggering “transformative learning” amongst participants and thus appropriate actions of all the stakeholder groups (policy makers, government staff, agribusinesses and local farmers) towards strong collaboration and joint actions. Regular reflections and sharing of lessons and experience at both local and global levels through the online knowledge hub Think2ImpactTM (http://think2impact.org/) would continuously improve learning and performance around the world.

Contributions to organizational learning theory, and project knowledge and stakeholder management are also discussed as other evident values of the ELLab.

Keywords: Co-learning; Inclusiveness; Stakeholder; Systems thinking; Transformative learning; True participation. 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder... Read More →
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →
TM

Tuan Minh Ha

PhD Student, The University of Adelaide Business School
ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Yin/Yang Cancer Treatment System: A Fundamental Shift in Cancer Management
Yin/Yang Cancer Treatment System: A Fundamental Shift in Cancer Management

2453

FUNDAMENTAL SHIFT IN CANCER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM     

Elior L. Kinarthy, PhD

elior.kinarthy@gmail.com

www.cancer-vcrc.org

Better cancer screening and advances in various treatments have increased the survival rate of the majority of cancer patients to over five years. The purpose of this pilot case study is to demonstrate that with a restructured cancer management system the survival rate of a male patient with bone metastatic prostate cancer can potentially exceed 15 years. The fundamental shift in the cancer management begins from ground zero, a practical integration of western and eastern systems of treating cancer.

This 15 year case study uses Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman’s “System 1 and System 2” decision making process (Thinking, Fast and Slow, Doubleday, Canada, 2011). These systems of thinking can be used for adjusting the doctors’ orders to fit the patient’s needs. The goal is to select the most effective treatment management for that patient in an optimal support environment. The focus is the patient as a client participant. The method for treating cancer successfully requires new proactive rules of behaviour at home and at clinics and hospitals. The functional framework for treating cancer successfully requires adopting new roles of behaviour for the patient as a proactive client, the physician as an effective communicator and administrator of treatments, and the family, friends and the patients as a socio-emotive support group.

The effectiveness of the new system requires participation by all practitioners in a cancer client advocacy workshop run by a trained holistic case management technician that ensures that complementary treatments such as CBD (Cannabidiol), DCT (Dendritic Cell Therapy), hyperthermia, meditation, infusions, Proton radiation, green tea (Gyokuro), Ginger, Turmeric and others are considered, that there is a balance in the use of Allopathic, holistic, alternative and complementary treatments. All treatments must be “designed” for the patient-client taking into consideration age, culture, sex, emotional state, knowledge and expectation. The system must assure that the patient-client financial concerns don’t add additional stress and the place of residency is adequate while receiving treatments.

The success of this complex new system of cancer management depends on professional advocacy.  The advocacy must be a Yin-Yang balanced and harmonious symbiotic mix of western and eastern medicine, allopathic-holistic and traditional and complementary treatments.  This practical application of this conceptual model of treating cancer patients as cancer clients was based on a 15 year case study by a psychologist. The criterion  validity of this case study was established by examining the relationship between various traditional-complementary treatment modalities and their outcome as measured by blood tests, MRI, CT, PSA, Testosterone level and other bio-markers. Reliability has been established by repeated measurements. The results of this case study show that the patient as a participating client improved self-confidence, assertiveness, spirituality and prognosis. The new treatment model worked to effectively arrest cancer growth although some of the allopathic physicians disagreed with the changes in the treatment protocol initiated by the patient.

At the beginning of treatment a large tumour appeared in the prostate and metastasised to spinal lumbar vertebrae 10, 11, and 12. The prostate tumour was gone with 9 weeks of proton radiation treatment in California and extensive acupuncture to reduce pain, the metastasis was gone with 4 yearly dendritic and hyperthermia treatments in Cologne, Germany and the spinal bone tumour was removed surgically in Canada. Remission was demonstrated by successive MRI reports for the last 5 years. PSA reduction from 60 mg/mL to 0.01 mg/mL was shown by successive blood tests. It took 10 years to get to remission. Follow up tests shows no reoccurrence of cancer after 5 years.


Presenter / Artist
PE

Prof. Elior Kinarthy

Professor of Psychology, Rio Hondo College
ISSS Retired



Thursday August 6, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Abstract Expression Capability with Empirical Experience

This is a paper that deals with the information and analysis obtained through an experimental experience called “grasping the clay”. In this personal experiment, on one hand, I gathered data as a resource and statistically analyzed it, and on the other hand, reconsidered the experience with this particular bodily act through the development with methods of autopoiesis, phenomenology, and cognitive science.

It’s a common understanding that each individual has one’s own unique way of experience. Even as we are living the same world, one could have a totally different perspective towards an experience than that of another. Based on this idea, I developed the subject matter of this thesis, focusing on my personal work that gives significant importance to “feeling”, to elucidate the facts of experience that cannot but refer only in ambiguous and complex terms. Therefore, I have considered the relationship between the body and consciousness by setting it clear that even in consciousness there is a “feeling” movement, which can be described as “double operation” in relation with the body feeling. In addition, I have noted that the process of “experience” is supported and formed by a vast memory. It begins from the way of the recognition of a thing called “first recognition and the re-recognition,” and further I have discussed the issues of language and image to be involved in the formation of experience which lead to the formation and changes in impression. It is argued that for the mental representation of the impression, “touch” has an ability to feel, and in reality, it is talked about as “intensity”. I would like to further present that feeling which is included within the above mentioned properties of intensity can be an indication for the preceding acts, thus may work as expectation, and which then leads to sympathy.

In addition, a state called “trust and relief” which formed by the memory of the feel, is closely related to the feeling experience.

In particular, I have explained that the spheres of experience that advance with body movement, and “a so and so feeling” that is perceived as the inner feel of the body, and that the memory and image that greatly influence the choice of action, and this leads to the accomplishment of performing the operation within the feeling. In addition, to those that are classified as feel, as long as sense of touch and its memory are involved, I have understood that since any feeling has a feature called “ignoring”, a variety of adjustment and control have been naturally imbibed from the facts which influence any information that is relevant. In this way, I have tried to discuss in detail about the memory and images as an element that leads to the experience of “grasping the clay,” which induces a sense of direction, and further, adjusting the speed and pressure to the body. Those elements that are formed in this context are the “experiential knowledge obtained through touch or feel,” which present a new sign to the formation of human knowledge that has been formed through visuals at its core, with higher functions, such as language and thinking.

Based on such points, the experiment of “grasping the clay” was conducted to gather views through the experience of each individual person and to relate them to the relationship with sense of touch and language. The following is the synthesis of the experiment. The impression of clay as its target tends to be considered as a metaphor or the similarity of the goods, an analogy, which also been involved in awareness of the subject of “first recognition and re-recognition”, and it is possible that the impression could vary by touching the clay directly under each case. And, I realized that the “pleasant or unpleasant” feelings are established by doing over the prehistory of the subject under the continuation of one’s behavior. Also there is a variation in the experience by the degree of intimacy, such as a nostalgic feeling, through the degree of action represented by the word, such as “a success or a failure,” while in contact with the subject. In the continuation of the experience, the above variations may lead to a shift in the ways of looking at the subject by different individuals. Also the change was observed among the relationship between “the quantity” and “the numbers.” However, under the performative experience, it operates naturally, and is gradually formed because it is already in the process and cannot be withdrawn with clear signs. In other words, here “grasping the clay” has been the subject of a kind of an aesthetic, and the productive experience. In this way, in the process of “grasping the clay”, one is involved in the experience of self-forming, through creating certain forms or shapes, that are closely related to the bodily senses. In particular, the material called “clay” is reflects in detail the movement and the inner workings of an individual. In an experience called “grasping of the clay”, each individual follows several questions that are repeated while holding the clay, and by this process, individual differences are studied. In addition to the problem of “first recognition” and “the re-recognition”, memory that has already been working, the short-term memory is mediated by a change in the feel and the changes through such a process. In this context, it is noted that there are individual differences in the appearance of some objects or material.

This paper discusses the possibilities of such a performative experience and the various elements for expanding the human experience through the results of the experiment of “grasping of the clay.” In particular, since the experiment involves a feeling experience, it not only explores possibilities of the experiences based on the data, but also develops a stream of arguments that could involve cognitive sciences. This paper deals by considering the results of the inner senses, the elements that are not apparent through emphasizing on the perception, could be further considered for more clear solutions with consideration between abstract capability and empirical experience.


Presenter / Artist
SL

Suehye Lee

ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Quality of Primary Care in Buenos Aires. An Analysis from the Complexity Approach

It was realized a Qualitative Case Study of exploratory / descriptive type. The objective was to  evaluate the performance of a municipal Primary Care Network in view of the Strategies for the Development of Teams of Primary Care, proposed by the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO, 2008), and based on the theoretical and methodological elements that offers the Theory of Social Systems of Luhmann (Luhmann N., 1998).

The specific objectives were, to analyze and describe the distinction between the system (Primary Care network) and the environment (hospitals, other sectors of the public politics and the community), by which the system constitutes itself; to describe the autopoiesis of the decisions (the mechanism by which the decisions are connected and generates other decisions and actions); to identify difficulties to displace the paradoxes associated to the decisions; and describe different types of noises in the communications and autolysis within the PC network.

Twenty in Depth Interviews were realized (a representative of each one of 17 Primary Care Centers, the Director of Primary Care, the Director of the municipal hospital and a government representative) and 2 Group Interviews. Documents Revision (that the interviewees offered spontaneously) and multiple Informal Conversations were secondary sources of information also used.

Centered on the processes of decision making, our approach allowed to make clear dimensions relative to the services that quality evaluation tools of more frequent use do not allow to capture, specially the not-linear nature of the relations between human beings. It proposes a rationality of different type to think of Primary Care Networks as complex systems, and offers a perspective from where observing, in an iterative way, the global behaviour of the system, the qualities of his constitutive parts (individual and institutional actors), the emergent phenomena of the interaction between them, and the relation of the system with other systems of his environment.

Keywords: Primary Care. Quality of Health Care. Complexity. Niklas Luhmann


Presenter / Artist
FJ

Francisco Javier López

MD, Fundación FEMEBA
ISSS Two Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

A Systems Science Framework for Understanding the Nature of Governance

The natural world of life is replete with examples of systemic governance subsystems that operate to sustain the continuance of those systems. Every cell, organism, population, and ecosystem demonstrates various self-regulation and environmental coordination mechanisms that have evolved to ensure the long-term viability of that system. A formal approach from systems science that is built on these natural governance subsystems may provide some guidance to our understanding of human social systems and their governance. The emergence of higher levels of organization in the origins and evolution of life can be seen to be the story of increasing sophistication in governance subsystems as disparate complex adaptive systems coalesce into “societies” of interacting entities (super-molecules to primitive protocells, prokaryotic cells to eukaryotic cells, those to multicellular organisms, those to communities, etc.). At each stage in this on-going emergence of higher levels of organization the one consistent aspect is how hierarchical cybernetic structures have contributed to the stabilization of functional relations among the component entities leading to sustainable super-entity structures. The progression is from simple cooperation of multiple entities to intentional coordination emerging to manage complexity. Information processing and decision subsystems (agents) that took responsibility for logistical coordination among components and others that managed tactical coordination of the whole system with external (environmental) entities, resources, and threats evolved to keep increasingly complex biological entities able to maintain their existence and reproduction. Now the governance of human social systems that seek to exist in some kind of harmony with the Earth’s ecology (what I call the Ecos) has emerged in the last 100k years or so and evolved over that time frame to produce the modern socio-economic systems in existence today. But it (characterized here as the neoliberal capitalistic democracy) is not as evolved as, say, the mechanisms of metabolic regulation. There are numerous reasons to believe that the modern governance subsystem is, in fact, moving human societies toward the opposite of sustainable existence. A systems examination of the theory of governance subsystems (hierarchical cybernetics) suggests pathways toward a more functional governance subsystem for human societies. The theory covers the regulation of economic flows as well as the legal superstructure and moral/ethical aspects of culture that collectively constitutes the governance subsystem of a human society embedded in a meta-system, the Ecos.


Presenter / Artist
GM

George Mobus

Associate Professor, Emeritus, University of Washington Tacoma
ISSS Regular


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Disaster Management for Boiling Globe by World's 441 Nuclear-Heated Water

The present paper firstly outlines the ‘unstoppable’ nature of nuclear power generation as exemplified by the system lifecycle of ageing nuclear reactors, the decommissioning of reactors, and the nuclear waste disposal problem, which stakeholders find difficult to understand. Secondly, it highlights the sea-temperature rise in the northern hemisphere, specifically the North Pacific and North Atlantic, as a result of the thermal effluent water from nuclear power plants which is a product of today’s nuclear industry. Thirdly, it presents the hypothesis of the ‘Boiling Globe’ caused by this thermal effluent water, whereby the overheating of whole oceans compounds CO2–based atmospheric warming and accelerates the spread of infectious tropical diseases to the northern hemisphere. The paper points to the unsustainability of this global boiling caused by the world’s 441 nuclear plants with an average lifespan of 30 years. The traumatic experience of the Fukushima disaster has become a ‘disaster anchor’ based on psychological and cultural aspects, comparable to the career anchors of Edgar Schein (1978), and is a cultural function forming the premise of decision-making. From the standpoint of Japan, which has experienced Fukushima and other frequent disasters, it is therefore important to make the world aware of the necessity of disaster management for our sustainable future.

Keywords: disaster management; resilience; global boiling; sustainability; disaster anchor


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Prof. Shigeo Atsuji

Prof. Shigeo Atsuji

Professor, Kansai University
ISSS Two Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Educating and Empowering Children for Governing the Anthropocene: A Case Study of Children's Homes in Sri Lanka

Educating children and young people on how to care for the environment is the focus of this paper. Today’s children will encounter the adverse effects of global population growth and subsequent pollution by adults at the expense of the environment. Thus it is important to draw children’s attention to carbon footprints and climatic changes. Through participation they will have opportunities to learn more about the implications of the way we choose to live our lives in the short, medium and long terms. Children learn about their rights and responsibilities by being given the opportunity to express their ideas and to translate policy into practice through small scale interventions that make a difference to this generation and succeeding ones. Such interventions can include lessons on recycling, use and re-use of resources, composting, organic and ethical farming, water and energy conservation techniques and much more.

The essence of this paper has been extracted from my Participatory Action Research (PAR) on the life chances of children and young people in institutional care in Sri Lanka. This PAR largely employs qualitative investigations to manipulate the information collected during the study in order to assess and evaluate the findings. During the PAR, it was identified that some children’s homes have initiated a few enhanced ecosystem governance practices that redress problems associated with the worst aspects of industrialisation. These practices promote the harmonious coexistence of humanity and nature and have adopted the concerns of critical systemic thinking with consequent improvement of human well-being and ecosystem health. The potential of these homes to provide education for these vulnerable children by improving their ability to deliver stewardship responsibilities towards the environment should never be underestimated.

Keywords: Anthropocene, children’s homes, participatory action research, ecosystems, critical systemic thinking, stewardship responsibilities, capacity building, capabilities.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Eshantha Ariyadasa

Eshantha Ariyadasa

PhD Student, Flinders University, SA
ISSS Student.Interested in exploring approaches to enhance life chances and quality of life of children in institutional care.


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Interdisciplinary Co-Operation and System Modelling as Means to Govern the Anthropocene

Whether or not human beings act a geological force, it is obvious there are numerous of environmental problems that arise from geosphere-anthroposphere interaction which need to be treated in the future. Furthermore the governance of the partly adjacent cultural changes is due to dimensions a challenge of global proportion not seen earlier in the history of the earth. Humans do not only possess the power to destroy, but also to restore ecosystems of the earth. Solutions to the ozone depletion by technical developments of new fluids has been found. Acidification of Swedish low buffer soils and lakes, sensitive to acid rain, has decreased due to concerted action on Sulphur emission control in large parts of Europe. The standing biomass of Swedish forests has doubled in 100 years. The handling and recycling of solid waste has resulted in a considerable reduction of deposits in large parts of the world. There are many examples humans have been able to solve environmental problems when everybody agrees action is needed, and this is encouraging.

This paper argues that advanced systems analysis and modelling of environmental systems is one of the most efficient ways to establish a knowledge base for governing the societies towards sustainability. In the 1960 many observations and data made it evident that the environment in most countries was in a bad state. To get a holistic view of the complex problems and to clarify the relationships of structure and function, systems thinking was applied e.g. modelling, cybernetics, systems analysis, Life Cycle Assessment and energy and material flow analysis. These tools, collectively often named integrated assessment, help to communicate fundamental knowledge and support decision-making when identifying solutions. This basically natural scientific knowledge has also influenced the development within e.g. economy and jurisprudence and today ecological economy and environmental law assume ecological systems as fundamental.

The complexity of ecosystems and environmental issues can be understood by advanced scientific tools as modelling as a base for interdisciplinary co-operation. Each part of such models will of course be an approximation, but validation and verification of the models will make them useful. An ongoing research project at Mid Sweden University aims at building a complete carbon and energy balance model of the Swedish region Jämtland, based upon the Danish Samsø-model. The model will be part of the decision base for the county administration of Jämtland how to find ways to reach sustainability. Such models will make it possible to refer to a robust scientific base, thereby making it easier to argue for appropriate measures and actions. At the same time it will be clear what data these actions rest upon thereby making it easier to identify possible errors or limitations. A model of the energy production sector of the region shows governance complexity taking aspects of electricity production and export into consideration. 

By applying structured scientific knowledge built into models of systems, in-depth knowledge can be developed, thus learning more about the real boundaries. From these boundaries, limit values and recommendations can be set and communicated to gain social understanding. Applying system’s thinking seems to be a most creative way to govern the era of conscious environmental awakening – the Anthropocene or whatever it is.


Presenter / Artist
TS

Torbjörn Skytt

Mid Sweden University
ISSS Two Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Social Complexity in Project Management

In referencing social complexity, it seems that a problem description has been found that, at the very least, reveals the difference to traditional project management and opens the door to a space of solution into which we have yet only ventured a few steps. It is unfamiliar to think about political and cultural aspects in project management. However, initial experiences are promising.

The following is an exploration of the existing possibilities, which make dealing with social complexity fruitful for project management. After a brief, fundamental consideration of complexity (II.) and strategic complexity reduction (III.), the inevitability of the social (IV.) is considered against and with the backdrop of practical experience in change management (V.). This allows then, in the sense of Next Practice development perspectives (VIII.) a shedding of light on the instrumental manageability of the practice of the political (VI.) and the cultural (VII.). Finally, the conclusion (IX.) will provide an answer to the primary question: How can the exploration of social complexity further develop and improve the capabilities of project management?

Keywords: Social complexity, politics, culture, Next Practice, strategic complexity reduction


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

The Apithology of Humanity Psychology: An Introduction
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Will Varey

Will Varey

Principal, Apithologia
William Varey (PhD) works as a systems science researcher with a focus on sustainable social systems. His area of specialist contribution is in the systemic approach to the formation of generative potentials. He is a lecturer in systems approaches to systemic change management, sustainability... Read More →



Thursday August 6, 2015 16:00 - 18:00 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

A Wicked Methodology for the Analysis of Wicked Problems: Integrating the Analysis of Meetings and Networks

One feature of the Anthropocene is the rise of large-scale environmental problems produced by human actions.  A pressing problem is how to manage these environmental problems effectively.  Their governance is often challenging because different stakeholder groups disagree on what the appropriate course of action should be.  Furthermore, the problems are often complex, and scientific knowledge about them may contain significant gaps and uncertainties. We are interested in understanding the most challenging of these situations, which are often termed “wicked problems,” and what effective environmental governance might look like under those conditions.  In this paper, we report on a new, integrative methodology we have developed for analyzing governance processes by examining communications both within an environmental decision-making group and across the stakeholder networks within which the group is embedded.  Shaped by a systems perspective, our methodology weaves together multiple theoretical frameworks, methodological approaches, forms of data, and levels of analysis.  Very few previous studies have closely examined the actual decision-making process in participatory meetings, or situated these meetings in the broader stakeholder network interactions within which they are embedded. Our approach redresses this significant gap in the literature.  For our field site, we selected a commission that was formed to develop recommendations for a new municipal ordinance on hydraulic fracturing (fracking).  In order to preserve the anonymity of the commission, we do not identify the geographic region in which the commission was located, other than to say it was in the United States.  Fracking exhibits all of the features associated with wicked problems, including multiple stakeholders with conflicting values, scientific uncertainty, and political complexity.

 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Prof. Christina Wasson

Prof. Christina Wasson

Professor, University of North Texas
Christina Wasson’s work is motivated by a passion for three Cs: communication, collaboration, and community-building. Her research investigates how technology can bring together people who are geographically separated. She applies her findings to the design of technologies and organizational... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Coverage of 'Human Factors' in Project Management Literature: A Systematic Journal Review

Researchers of project management over the last 20 years have published multiple significant reviews that have served to map the landscape of project management, revealing its complexity and deepening our understanding. Contributing to this understanding is an ongoing challenge, and one dependent on the timely identification of topics that reveal truths and propel practice. This paper contributes to this understanding through a systematic review of more than 1100 journal articles published in the last 5 years on the theme of the ‘human factors’ of project management that reveals their multiplicity, distribution and focus. The article will conclude with directions for future research. 


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences.SIG Chair: Action Research (see below for information)Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Positeams – Positive Systems Intelligent Teams, an Agent-Based Simulator for Studying Group Behaviour

Systems intelligence is the ability to act intelligently within complex systems involving interactions and feedback. Social groups are systems, i.e. wholes consisting of multiple mutually interacting parts, where the interactions often include non-linearities and feedback loops. Agent-based simulations have been used extensively to model social systems. In this paper we use a new systems intelligence perspective when analysing the performance of a team. We consider and model the dynamics of positivity in a social system. The goal is to help understand the full consequences of our behaviour, both positive and negative, and how we could change it for the benefit of the whole system. Agent-based simulations of social networks can provide useful insights into the underlying systems and introduce ideas to improve their performance. The dynamics of social systems can be difficult to understand because of their systemic nature. In addition, one seldom has an opportunity to view social systems from the outside, but rather one is an active part within the system with some power to affect its state. Agent-based simulations support the systems approach by emphasizing the holistic view on understanding the problem rather than focusing on its parts in isolation, facilitating personal decision making in social systems.

PoSITeams is a web-based multi-agent social simulator that simulates the dynamics and evolution of positive and negative affect in a team. People are greatly influenced by the emotions of others and positive emotional contagion has been linked to increased performance in social groups. In particular, the ratio of positive and negative affect has proven to be an especially useful parameter, and it has been successfully applied to predicting effective organizations and successful marriages. Also on the individual level the characteristic difference between flourishing and non-flourishing individuals has been observed to be the ratio of experienced positive and negative emotions. Thus simulating emotion dynamics can be used to better understand how to act more constructively within organizations. Our model is a discrete-time non-linear dynamic model, where the positivity ratio defines the agent's interaction style. The level of emotional contagion depends on the strength of the social contact between the agents and their personal characteristics, such as tendency to express and be influenced by emotions. Furthermore, the positivity ratio of the agents increases their resiliency against negative emotions as indicated by the positivity research.

The purpose of the simulator is to enable the user to simulate social groups of her own and explore the effects of different behavioural and structural changes. We are especially interested in engaging the user in reflective thought-processes and facilitate seeing the system as a whole and let the user recognize herself as an active part of the system, who is both able to affect the state of the system and is reciprocally influenced herself by the system, a concept known as systems intelligence introduced by Esa Saarinen and Raimo P. Hämäläinen. The simulator is also able to suggest systems intelligent actions by optimizing the total positivity of the group.

Compared to the related agent-based models for emotional contagion, our approach emphasizes the qualitative differences between the negative and positive affect as described by psychological research, namely the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions and the negativity bias, which motivate modelling the positive and negative affect separately. We also highlight the significance of positivity ratios to describe the performance of social groups.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Teemu Tiinanen

Teemu Tiinanen

Aalto University
I currently work on systems intelligence, which is the ability to act intelligently within complex systems involving interaction and feedback. (see http://systemsintelligence.aalto.fi/). I am especially interested in developing methods to support systems intelligent behaviour in organizations.I... Read More →


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Requirements Analysis on a Virtual Reality Training System for CBRN Crisis Preparedness

Effective training is a cornerstone of crisis and disaster preparedness. Quality, consistency and frequency of training are shown to impact self-perceived disaster readiness of first responder units. However, barriers such as time, cost and safety limit the extent to which large groups of responders can be brought up to established standards, particularly related to integrated disaster team response skills and experience. This is particularly evident during events involving large-scale mobilization of population-based healthcare and public health resources where skills learned through training impact directly the actual response. The advent of technologically-based approaches through Virtual Reality (VR) environments holds significant promise in its ability to bridge the gaps of other established training formats. VR integrates real-time computer graphics, body-tracking devices, visual displays and other sensory inputs to immerse individuals in computer-generated virtual environments. VR creates an illusion in the user of being physically inside the virtual world, and this sense of presence can have positive effects on task performance, enabling the learning situation to be experienced as a real context, which in turn promotes experiential learning. Indeed, VR enables individuals to learn by doing, through first-person experiences. Over the past decade, VR-based training in crisis preparedness has been increasingly recognized as an important adjunct to traditional modalities of real-life drills. Multiple studies, have highlighted VR applications in crisis and disaster training. Many government agencies have adopted until now VR-based training. However, existing solutions mostly offer desktop-based VR training that lacks visual 3D immersion and navigation by natural walking. Both factors decline the sense of presence. Furthermore, natural walking is essential to simulate stress and physical excitement, which is of particular interest to create a realistic training for on-site squad leaders and rescue teams. There are only a few existing solutions that provide immersive VR training through stereoscopic 3D scene viewing and body motion analysis. However, these systems are solely designed for military training, are very expensive and require extensive technical knowledge for system setup. These factors heavily diminish their applicability for crisis training of first responder agencies since they require a flexible immersive VR system to enable multi-user, interdisciplinary team training at different command levels in various training scenarios. As the first step towards a flexible multi-user VR training system, we performed two thorough analyses. The first is a comprehensive state of the art analysis that outlines the capabilities of existing VR systems for single and multi-user training. The second is a requirement analysis of two peer stakeholder - the Austrian Federal Ministry of Defense and Sports (BMLVS) and the Red Cross Innsbruck, Austria - with a focus on CBRN training tasks. Three uses cases are developed that describe training scenarios that would be highly beneficial to be trained with a VR system. Subsequently, we discussed both analyses and draw conclusions if – and to which extent – current technology satisfy the essential stakeholder requirements. Finally, we outlined future research steps. 


Presenter / Artist
AP

Assoc. Prof. Hannes Kaufmann

Associate Professor, TU Wien
ISSS One Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Systemic Praxis for doing Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS)

Implementing the (2015-2030) sustainable development goals (SDGs) provides opportunities and challenges for profiling the resonance and relevance of systems thinking amongst policy practitioners (policy advisors,  policy makers and policy managers and administrators).  It may also provide an opportunity for  reconciling the sometimes disparate contemporary traditions of complexity thinking and systems thinking amongst systemic practitioners.  The two traditions draw different emphases on three uses of the systems idea – ‘natural’  systems (e.g., complex adaptive systems), mechanical – ‘purposive’ - systems (e.g., computerised agent-based modelling of complex systems), and  social – ‘purposeful’ – systems (e.g, design and implementation of interventions).

Some ideas are floated to help capture opportunities in the ensuing flux of events, people and ideas associated with the implementation of SDGs.  Drawing on the lineage of traditions in complexity and systems thinking, the author plays with ideas of boundary critique and complex adaptive systems as ways of exploring purposeful systemic praxis.

Praxis is understood as theory-in-action in order to transform a situation (cf. Paulo Freire: 1921-1997).  Systemic praxis is understood as transformation from emergent change in three interdependent factors: (i)  an operational change in patterns of inter-relationships regarding issues at stake; (ii)  an ethical change in viewpoints and perspectives amongst stakeholders; and (iii) political change in boundaries and relations of power amongst stakeholders and their stakeholdings. The ideas of systemic praxis framework outlined is an adapted version of boundary critique derived from traditions of critical systems thinking of Werner Ulrich and American philosophical pragmatism associated with Charles Peirce (1839-1914), William James (1842-1910), and John Dewey (1859-1952).

Drawing on Nichomachean ethics and practical wisdom (cf. Aristotle: 384-322 BC), systemic praxis can be manifest through systemic failure (bad praxis or ‘dyspraxia’) as much as systemic improvement (good praxis or ‘eupraxia’). Examples of systemic failure in ‘doing’ sustainability are illustrated with ideas of The Iron Triangle used for understanding complex realities from a political economy viewpoint (e.g., J.K. Galbraith and Amartya Sen) and political activism (e.g., Arundhati Roy and Angela Davis).  Other examples of ‘dyspraxia’  are illustrated in terms of (either/or) dualisms as distinct from (both/and) dualities;  for example, reinforcing a division between ‘planning’ of SDGs through the UN Working Group on Sustainability, and the enacting or doing of SDGs.  Dualism notions of ‘deliverology’ remain prevalent in contemporary management systems relating to sustainable development.

Systemic good praxis (eupraxia) is regarded in contrast as a duality between systematic and systemic; between purposive and purposeful systems thinking in practice. A three-fold strategy for doing SDGs is suggested.  Firstly, ideas of adaptive action,  suggested by Glenda Eoyang influenced by complex adaptive systems,  provide a means for understanding inter-relationships – getting unstuck. The process engages practitioners with summative evaluation.  This prompts questions of systemic design, the second phase of good systemic praxis.  Here, the Vanguard method influenced by process systems thinking from John Seddon, provides a helpful Check-Plan-Do (CPD) model prompting awareness of formative evaluation.  The third phase requires an interplay of summative and formative evaluation through developmental evaluation, initiated through the works of Michael Q. Patton.  Good systemic praxis involves generating value.  Rather than considered as ‘phases’ the three attributes of praxis are more properly understood as continually iterative.  A further important attribute of good systemic praxis is to draw on stakeholders’ own experiences and skill-sets to provide the grounding for doing SDGs purposefully and with beneficial impact.  


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Martin Reynolds

Martin Reynolds

Senior Lecturer, The Open University
Systems Thinking in Practice Postgraduate Qualifications Director Distance learning Developmental Evaluation ISSS Regular Environmental responsibility


Thursday August 6, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

'The Greater Push' for Growth and Sustainability in Africa - Evidence from Ghana
Presenter / Artist
KE

Kwamina Ewur Banson

Student, University of Adelaide
ISSS Student


Thursday August 6, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

Agent-Based Modelling of Cooperation in WEEE Management: The Case of Colombia

As a result of population growth, technological development and change in consumption patterns, amounts of waste of electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) have increased significantly in recent years. At the same time, the demand for natural and scarce resources like precious metals and rare earth elements required to produce electrical and electronic equipment has increased. As a result, urban mining has become a sensible means for curtailing the effects of increasing WEEE. This implies a systemic policy making approach which includes both consumer and producer responsibility in WEEE management. Moreover, cooperation between different actors is imperative. Therefore, policy making should involve a holistic understanding of the different processes in WEEE management (production, distribution, consumption, collection, recycling, disposal), its various but interdependent dimensions (technical, social, environmental, legislative, economic), as well as the diversity in actors and their respective interests and motivations. In this context, modelling and simulation tools become necessary to support policy makers in making more systemic decisions.

This paper proposes that, by linking actor-network theory (ANT) and agent-based modelling (ABM), policy makers are enabled to create an in-depth reconstruction of historical trajectories that can capture the dynamics that have led to collective patterns (whether successful or not). In addition, this ATN-ABM link helps to represent the agency of both human and non-human actors interacting in a particular environment. In this proposal ANT is used as a novel theoretical approach for ABM which has been applied within an exploratory case study in the context of WEEE. A methodological framework has been applied to design an agent-based model aimed at answering the following question: How to orchestrate individual interests of producers, distributors and WEEE managers to achieve stability of cooperation?

The purpose of the resulting model, implemented in Netlogo 5.2, is to illustrate the potential impact of different levels of cooperation between government, producers and distributors of electronic and electrical equipment, as well as managers of WEEE. Depending of the individual interests of parties and the starting point of the alliance, a potential stability of the cooperation is generated. This cooperation is materialized in the adoption and implementation of strategies aimed at improving WEEE sustainability. These strategies-towards-sustainability (STS) are mechanisms intended to encourage consumers to deliver their WEEE back to the system, and which include a mix of physical artefacts, economic incentives, educational strategies and supporting social-environmental projects. In addition, the STS could be implemented under either collective or individual scheme, and in both cases cooperation between producers and distributors is needed.

The agent-based model can generate simulated scenarios showing cooperation stability, depending on individual interests and agreements, and how they evolve towards alignment or otherwise breakdown. The various scenarios enable analysing and anticipating potential success of specific STS in transforming cooperation over time.

One of the main reasons for using ABM is that emergent collective patterns of behaviour can be explored. As preliminary results, e.g., although historically significant events in WEEE management, such as a regulatory milestone from environmental authorities, can generate an initial cooperation between actors, it does not provide high potential stability of the cooperation to develop. The ABM implemented also showed that when producers autonomously decide to implement individual take-back strategies (which anyway need cooperation producer–distributor), their interests can be satisfied; nevertheless, in a collective system the potential stability is higher. 

The scenarios generated in this ABM represent past events in the case study and help to define potential stability of cooperation that emerge based on the interest of actors involved in alliances and the origin of these agreements. However, it is necessary to show also the denouement of the cooperation in time, which is being developed through a complementary ABM that involves the dynamics between the STS and consumers behaviors.


Presenter / Artist
avatar for Ass. Prof. Sandra Méndez-Fajardo

Ass. Prof. Sandra Méndez-Fajardo

Assistant Professor, Javeriana University
PhD Candidate, Doctorate in Engineering, Javeriana University, Bogota, ColombiaSolid Waste Management, e-Waste, Agent-Based Modelling, Sustainability, Community participation


Thursday August 6, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

Feedback Information on Individual's Time Perception Improves Project Management Control

‘Project’ as a form of organising work has received an increased popularity, among several reasons due to its ability to handle various strategic and operational complexities. However, frequent reports suggest that many projects fail to meet the set objectives, in terms of outcome quality, time of delivery, and costs. There are various reasons to this, however one important cause, yet little researched, is what is called ‘time leakage’. The latter occurs when human agents’ perceived time (cognitive time) differs from the clock time (physical time) and thereby produces Cognitive Time Distortion. This is unconditional to any human agent due to the cognitive functioning, and its typical consequence is that more time is consumed by professionals than it was planned for (prospective time distortion) and also than it is reported (retrospective time distortion).

In order to advance techniques to handle Cognitive Time Distortion in a somewhat positive manner, a generic hypothesis was formulated stating that: information about a subject’s time-perception, both from planned and executed activities, may be fed back (feedback) to the subject who conducted the activities, and thereby induces subject’s learning of how to perceive time. By development of time perception capability, in turn, may contribute to the reduction of time leakage due to Cognitive Time Distortion, which will have positive influence on the execution of project vs the set objectives.

More specifically, this paper presents results form a laboratory experiment (N = 63) in which different modes of feed-back has been tested. The experiment targeted especially the quality dimension ‘precision of delivery’ and the economic goal as measured in profit. The participators in the experiment were sorted in two groups; and each group was asked to conduct a task, and make time assessments, which was followed by subjects’ reception of feedback. Two kinds of feedback were compared in the experiment; one based on promises of monetary reward and one based on precise information about errors in individual time assessment. The time related feedback was specifically based on the participators time perception as measured in percent of the assessed time duration. Mean values and dispersion of the time assessments of the two groups were compared. It is concluded that feedback with individual time perception improved the quality dimension precision of delivery significantly. It can also be concluded that feedback with individual time perception supports the budgeted profit, while feedback of only monetary rewards only does not. In addition, the two groups exhibited significantly different attitudes with respect to work-related factors, such as perceived motivation and perceived efficiency, suggesting that mode of feedback is an important work environmental factor. The outcome from this study suggests that project management may reduce failure rate in projects and improve project outcome with respect to service quality and profit, when feedback information about individual time perception is utilized.


Presenter / Artist
PF

Prof. Fabian Von Scheele

Professor, Linnaeus University
ISSS Regular


Thursday August 6, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

Systemic Resolutions for the Reductionistic Conflicts: A Case Study of the 2014 Hong Kong 928 Protest
Presenter / Artist
CH

Chris H. Hardy

ISSS Two Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

Using Critical Systems Thinking to Promote Reflexivity on an Engineering Sacrosanct Concept

This paper presents a systemic intervention in which a group of researchers and engineering students used critical systems thinking ideas to promote reflexivity on a basic concept that underlies engineering practice: efficiency. In particular we explored a situation in which students had to deal simultaneously with issues of efficiency and justice. Engineering students are frequently trained to design efficient systems or to improve the efficiency of already existing systems. Although engineering and economic efficiency are not the same, young engineering students tend to equate and value both of them. However, within many contexts efficiency is not the only relevant criteria for judging among different alternative solutions to engineering problems. Justice and other ethical considerations are also frequently relevant. Not all efficient technical solutions are also the most fair, and vice versa. In this paper we describe a research inquiry in which a group of engineering students were invited to choose among diverse solutions, involving issues of justice and efficiency. Based on the work of a group of scholars such as John Rawls, John Nash, Robert Aumann, and Howard Raiffa, the students explored different conceptions of justice as well as their relationships with efficiency. During this process that involved both individual and collective work, we found evidence that the students become engaged in uncovering and questioning their ways of thinking and behaving, as well as their moral frameworks. Initially we found a tendency among engineering students to be unwilling to deviate from the solutions that involve Pareto efficiency, to give priority to efficiency over justice, to understand justice only within the context of efficiency, as well as to experience difficulties in developing rational arguments to reach rationally justifiable conclusions on issues of justice and efficiency. The research revealed that senior undergraduate and master engineering students frequently experience a substantial difficulty in arguing coherently in debates about practical rationality, something that is in stark contrast with their good ability to deal with technical issues and mathematical calculations. At the beginning of the experiment disputed questions related to justice and efficiency were frequently treated not as a matter of rational enquiry and justification, but as a problem of personal opinions and unarticulated presuppositions that were relegated to the realm of irrational acts of belief. The use of boundary critique and several critical systems thinking tools contributed to change the way engineering students made and justify their choices among competing conceptions of justice, and to develop a new notion on how to reach a balance between efficiency and justice. The discussion helped students to reflect on wider issues that involved their role in issues of social justice in their society. The changes that students experienced were not the result of the researchers’ intentions to convince the students of making some particular choices, but of a dialogical rather than a monological approach to ethical issues and practical rationality. This dialogical approach involved the exploration of different alternative boundary judgements that promote reflexivity on what and whose views are included in or excluded from analysis. Students were able to understand that different ethical choices result from choosing diverse boundary judgements.

 


Presenter / Artist
LP

Luis Pinzon-Salcedo

Associate Professor, Universidad de los Andes
ISSS Dev


Thursday August 6, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

A Systemic and Hyperdimensional Model of a Conscious Cosmos and the Ontology of Consciousness in the Universe

The existence of consciousness in the universe as a consequent dimension of reality and a force able to shape material reality has to be integrated in cosmological physics theories whose stated aim is to describe the whole universe. General Systems Theory is a substantial global systemic framework that, blended with hyperdimensional physics, can ground such modeling.

It is a fact that only by positing hyperdimensions can actual physics succeeds in reaching a near-unification of the four forces by blending the frameworks of Relativity Theory and Quantum Mechanics (such as in Witten’s 11-dimensional M-Theory). This paper argues that the only way to integrate the dimension of consciousness in a theory of the universe is by modeling a complex hyperdimension of consciousness (or ‘syg hyperdimension’) consisting in complex semantic fields (operating at all levels, from the cosmic to the biosystems levels), and entwined with a hyperspace and hypertime. The well substantiated ‘nonlocal’ dynamics of consciousness, experimentally evidenced, show mind processes constantly violating Newtonian-Einsteinian space and time constraints, and following instead complex systems dynamics based on connectivity and meaning.

The Infinite Spiral Staircase theory (ISST) postulates that this triune hyperdimension operates at a sub-quantum scale, at the origin of the universe before the very Planck scale that allows the existence of particles (matter), as well as space and time. It is a Kaluza-Klein compact 5th dimension with a bulk pervading and encompassing our universe; the virtual particles of tachyonic speed populating it, the sygons, instantiate the very meaning-driven dynamics of our minds and allow for instant connectivity at a distance and two-way influences between semantic fields or minds and bio- and matter- systems.

Keywords: Systemic cosmology; General Systems Theory; Hyperdimension of consciousness; Hyperspace; ontology of consciousness;

 


Presenter / Artist
CH

Chris H. Hardy

ISSS Two Day


Thursday August 6, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

A Systems Science Approach to Address the Urban Tourism Role in the Current Re-Urbanization Project of Mexico City

Nowadays, faster population growth as well as new lifestyles which societies have adopted, partly due to the intensive use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), have lead governments to provide alternatives to reduce the problems caused by population growth mainly in large cities, besides addressing the necessities and requests of their citizens and visitors. The aim of this research is to generate the first approaches for the urban tourism role, as one of the main Economic sectors for cities, in the Digital, Smart and Knowledge city (DSKC) of Mexico City under a systemic approach. Thus, the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) is applied. At the same time, the Strategic-Management Model (SMM) is used in a complementary and parallel way. The results achieved so far allow us to propose: i) a definition of the DSKC; ii) an approach to the urban tourism role in the DSNC; iii) a first outline of the systemic model of urban tourism in the DSKC of Mexico City; iv) the conflicts among the components of urban tourism and the DSKC; v) the key stakeholders of the system and; vi) the mission of the system in study, as well as feasible strategies to implement shortly to accomplish the mission. Hence, the bases are stablished in order to continue with the remaining steps of the Methodology and model for the construction of a systemic model proposal of the urban tourism incorporation in the DSKC of Mexico City.

 


Presenter / Artist
PO

Prof. Oswaldo Morales-Matamoros

Professor, IPN
ISSS Dev


Thursday August 6, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Open
Thursday August 6, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany