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Registration open daily from 8am - 6pm.  Please join us for the #ISSS2015 #Roundtable at 7.45am each morning.

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Theme: Systemic Evaluation and Transdisciplinarity [clear filter]
Monday, August 3
 

18:00 CEST

ISSS Board Meeting (Board Members)
Everyone is invited to the daily reflection RoundTable. We will meet every morning for an hour before the plenaries, Monday through Friday. Join us every day, or whenever you like.

Our RoundTable purposes are to open a space for daily reflection on our ideals, what we want to learn and create; to increase time for each of us to talk from about what we are thinking and learning now; and to be listened to by others, enjoying and learning with each other in a new way.

 Our format is:





  • We spend 5 minutes listening to short readings.



  • We then spend 50 minutes on individual reflections or learning reports, time distributed equally among all present (e.g. 26 people = about 2 minutes each).





 Our suggested topics for the first morning will be:



  1. "Linking this year’s theme, Governing the Anthropocene, to your specific field of expertise, what do you see as our greatest challenges and hopes?”   AND/OR



  2. "What situations and projects did you leave behind to come here, and what could happen here that would be valuable to you in your work and life back home?”




Each day, a different topic will be suggested by a different volunteering facilitator in attendance.

Folk wisdom and compelling research indicate that participants experience surprising benefits from this activity after about four sessions. Our own experience with this format has resulted in the following theory: Just as we break the sound barrier when we travel faster than the speed of sound, we break the communication barrier when we hear 25 authentic viewpoints in 50 minutes.

Looking forward to experiencing this with you all.

Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below)Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social... Read More →

Monday August 3, 2015 18:00 - 19:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
 
Tuesday, August 4
 

07:45 CEST

ISSS Roundable Discussion
Moderators
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below)Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 07:45 - 08:45 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:00 CEST

Keynote: Prof. Mary Catherine Bateson - Causality and Responsibility
Speakers
avatar for Prof. Mary Catherine Bateson

Prof. Mary Catherine Bateson

Writer, Cultural Anthropologist
"We are not what we know but what we are willing to learn.”Mary Catherine Bateson is a writer and cultural anthropologist living in the Monadnock region of New Hampshire with frequent visits to Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has written and co-authored many books and articles, lectures... Read More →

Presenter / Artist
avatar for Patricia Kambitsch

Patricia Kambitsch

Conference Sketch Artist, Playthink
I am an interdisciplinary artist and author.I facilitate dialogue through the visual arts, theatre, creative writing, and dance. As a former classroom teacher and adviser for over twenty years in urban public schools, I helped found one of the first Gates Foundation-funded Early College... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:00 - 09:45 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

09:45 CEST

Panel: Systemic Evaluation: A Panel Presentation and Discussion
The panellists will draw on a mixture of theoretical insight and rich practical experience in using systems thinking and complexity ideas for progressing mainstream programme and policy evaluations. The discussion will centre on what helps and hinders systemic evaluation; that is, developmental evaluation where value judgements properly inform the design (ex-ante/ formative) as well as the effects (ex-poste/ summative) of any intervention. The challenges of systemic evaluation are explored from the perspective of different practitioners including policy advisors, policy decision makers, project/programme managers, and commissioners of evaluations.

Moderators
avatar for Martin Reynolds

Martin Reynolds

Senior Lecturer, The Open University
Systems Thinking in Practice Postgraduate Qualifications Director Distance learning Developmental Evaluation ISSS Regular Environmental responsibility

Speakers
avatar for Emily Gates

Emily Gates

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Emily is an I-STEM graduate research assistant currently working on several program evaluations: the NSF-funded Entrepreneurial Leadership in STEM Teaching and Learning (EnLiST) program; the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Coal Education Program; and... Read More →
avatar for Richard Hummelbrunner

Richard Hummelbrunner

Senior Associate, OEAR Regionalberatung
In the past Richard Hummelbrunner has worked extensively as practitioner and advisor in the field of regional policy at various levels (local, national, EU, international development).During recent years Richard’s interest has shifted to evaluation, and has gained extensive experience... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Mita Marra

Prof. Mita Marra

Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration, University of Salerno
Mita Marra is currently the President of the Italian Evaluation Association (2013). She is tenured Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration at the University of Salerno and Senior Researcher at Italian National Research Council in Naples since 2000. She has been... Read More →
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 09:45 - 10:45 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

10:45 CEST

Tea/Coffee
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Tuesday August 4, 2015 10:45 - 11:15 CEST
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:15 CEST

Panel: Chair Stefan Blachfellner, VP IFSR - Are we ready to leverage the present future of systems research? Personal reflections and institutional perspectives on current opportunities and constraints in the field
Lead by the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR) Vice Presidents: Stefan Blachfellner, Mary Edson, Nam Nguyen

Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan

Speakers
avatar for Mary Edson

Mary Edson

President, maredson.s3@gmail.com
Mary Edson is President of the International Federation for Systems Research.  As a Scholar/Practitioner whose major interests are in Complex Adaptive Social Systems, she teaches courses in Executive Leadership, Strategic Project Management, and Talent Management including Diversity... Read More →
avatar for Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

Director (Australia and Southeast Asia, Malik) and Honorary Fellow (Systems Design and Complexity Management, UoA), Malik Management Institute, Switzerland and The University of Adelaide (UoA), Australia
Dr Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of Malik Management Institute, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organizations for holistic, system-cybernetic management, governance, and responsible leadership). He is also a Director of SysPrac Pty Ltd and a co-founder... Read More →



Tuesday August 4, 2015 11:15 - 11:45 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

11:45 CEST

Keynote: Dr David Rousseau - Manifesto for General Systems Transdisciplinarity
Manifesto for General Systems Transdisciplinarity (GSTD)

Dr David Rousseau, Centre for Systems Philosophy, UK

Dr Jennifer Wilby, Centre for Systems Studies, University of Hull, UK

Julie Billingham, Centre for Systems Philosophy, UK

Stefan Blachfellner, Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of the Systems Sciences, Austria

The ISSS was founded on an ambition to develop a systems transdiscipline, grounded in a General System Theory (GST), which could be leveraged to build a systemically healthy world that promotes personal dignity, human welfare, international cooperation and environmental stewardship.  The ISSS pioneers saw this as an urgently needed response to looming human, social and environmental crises, which at least in part coincide with what we recognise today as the Anthropocene. This ambition and call to action remain as inspiring and pertinent today as they were when the ISSS was founded in 1956 as theSociety for the Advancement of General Systems Theory.  The crises anticipated by our founders are now upon us, making the founders’ vision and call to action more pertinent than ever.

Over the last two years ISSS members David Rousseau, Jennifer Wilby, Julie Billingham and Stefan Blachfellner have been investigating the possibility of accelerating progress towards a General Systems Transdiscipline (GSTD). This was done by working with:





  • contributors to the ISSS’s SIG on Systems Philosophy and SIG on Research towards a General Theory of Systems in 2013 and 2014,



  • participants in a special Symposium of the 2014 European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR),



  • participants in a special 2014 Conversation of the International Federation of Systems Research (IFSR), and



  • attendees of a 2015 Workshop of the Systems Science Working Group (SysSciWG) of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE).





Based on these investigations, we believe that the issues that have in the past hindered the development of a GSTD are no longer significant, and new opportunities have arisen such that rapid progress with the development of a GSTD is now a practical possibility.

In this presentation David Rousseau will present our Manifesto for General Systems Transdisciplinarity, in which we outline our perspective on why the development of a GSTD is still an urgent need for our times, why it is a viable prospect to develop one now, what we see as the key to opening the route to developing a GSTD, what a GSTD would look like, what it would take to develop such a transdiscipline, how it would unlock our potential to build a flourishing future society, and (most importantly) our call to action for:





  • the ISSS to renew its commitments to its founding ambitions, and



  • ISSS members to actively engage in the new phase of work towards developing, establishing and leveraging a General Systems Transdiscipline.





We will announce the establishment of a broad-based community program of work towards fulfilling our manifesto objectives, and give details of how ISSS members can participate in this programme. 

Speakers
avatar for David Rousseau

David Rousseau

Founder & Managing Director, Centre for Systems Philosophy
SIG Chair: Research Towards a General Theory of SystemsSIG Chair: Systems Philosophy Dr. David Rousseau is the Founder and Managing Director of the Centre for Systems Philosophy, which promotes the use of Systems Philosophy as a methodology for addressing problems that require both... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 11:45 - 12:30 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

12:30 CEST

Lunch
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Tuesday August 4, 2015 12:30 - 13:30 CEST
Scandic Restaurant 3rd Floor Hotel Scandic Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin

13:30 CEST

Examining the Promise of Systems Thinking to Transform Evaluation Practice

Government agencies, foundations, and international development organizations seek to evaluate the consequences of policies and programs (i.e. social interventions) they fund. Evaluation practitioners who conduct these evaluations typically use methods based on linear models of social interventions and straightforward cause-effect thinking to examine whether interventions achieve their intended consequences. However, these approaches often fail to capture unintended and unpredictable consequences of interventions because they are not suited to addressing uncertain, complex, and non-linear social change. In the last ten years, the evaluation field has begun turning to systems thinking for alternative ways of understanding social interventions and change. While there are significant efforts to import systems thinking to other fields including public health, international aid and development, organizational management, and human services there has been little research on the value of systems thinking for evaluation practice. Translating insights from the systems thinking literature into the language and tasks of evaluation practice holds considerable promise for improving the latter undertaking.

This paper is a critical, analytical review of the interdisciplinary literature on systems thinking in relation to the evaluation of social interventions. The review discovers how systems thinking: (1) is conceptualized in the evaluation literature and (2) contributes to and challenges current assumptions that evaluation practitioners use to frame the task of evaluating social interventions. Journal articles, working papers, briefs, and conference proceedings published between 1988 and 2015 within select intervention-driven fields – public health, international aid and development, organizational management, education, and human services—were analyzed using categories based on a widely accepted, foundational framework of evaluation practice. Drawing on this literature, I argue that systems thinking compels intervention fields and agencies to re-frame the model of social problem solving that guides their work from predict-act-evaluate to adaptive management. For evaluation practice to be relevant and useful in an adaptive management model, it must transform its core assumptions regarding social interventions and context, methods, values, knowledge, and use. I contend that the promise of systems thinking lies in its potential to transform these assumptions and identify significant ways this transformation has begun unfolding in this literature.


Moderators
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Emily Gates

Emily Gates

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Emily is an I-STEM graduate research assistant currently working on several program evaluations: the NSF-funded Entrepreneurial Leadership in STEM Teaching and Learning (EnLiST) program; the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Coal Education Program; and... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Living Systems-Inspired Innovation

Biomimicry is an emerging transdisciplinary genre — a living systems-inspired approach to innovations. The Biomimicry Framework and Practice offer theory and application for innovating form, process, or system with nature as a model, mentor, and measure. The framework is composed of three essential elements: a) a practice of (re)connecting with nature, b) the Biomimicry Thinking Design Process for emulating strategies various organisms use for surviving and thriving, and c) the Biomimicry ethos which has a strict sustainability mandate embedded and is wrapped around 26 life principles (deep patterns in nature) that need to be met in order for a design to be considered a biomimetic innovation. At the core of the practice is the belief that life always creates conditions for life, and that human systems must be designed to do the same if we are to continue to thrive as a species on this planet.

In this paper, both the framework and the practice are introduced in order to draw attention to the interrelationship of system thinking, design thinking, and biology in this innovation approach. Secondly, this paper will be focused on potential application for leadership development. While Biomimics have mastered the design process when it comes to mimicking forms (product design) and processes (technology-driven innovation), and even complex business systems, what might perhaps come online now is the application of Biomimicry to the evolution of self & community. What does it mean to create conditions for life in one’s own life and to co-create these conditions with one’s local community so that co-evolution is the result? What models in nature exist from which people can learn? What are, for instance, the secrets of the precious interrelationships in ecosystems, such as the collective intelligence of coral reefs or mangroves, that cause these systems to co-evolve from the bottom up and thrive through self-organization? What is the delicate balance between the ecosystem relationships that keeps the system optimized? How might we expose and apply these secrets to the human world, in particular, to the development of self in community with others?

Keywords: Biomimicry, living systems, innovation, system thinking, design thinking, nature’s genius, ecosystem intelligence, co-evolution, collective intelligence.

To learn more about the Biomimicry Framework, the four-phased Biomimicry Thinking Design Process, and the creative engagement methodologies used for innovation, please visit: http://www.reginarowland.com/bio-innovation/ and thumb through the subpages on scoping, discovering, creating, and evaluating.


Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

SIG Chair: Leadership and Systemic Innovation, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

P2P in the Anthropocene with the Convergence Gathering as a Case Study

Victor MacGill

There are many threats as we move deeper into the anthropocene age. The dominance based hierarchies that have become an unquestioned part of 21st century life are a reflection of the linear profit driven paradigm that fails to see the interconnectedness between us, and between us and the world we inhabit.  In order to find a pathway out of the looming dystopic futures that appear to be unfolding, a new paradigm that recognises the connectedness within nature and the social world is necessary to generate new social structures that can lead to more sustainable, thriving futures.

One weak signal on the horizon that might foreshadow a change in paradigm towards a more healthy way of seeing the world and interacting in it is the peer to peer movement. The peer to peer movement creates ways for people to interact without intervening controlling hierarchies that build value for those involved. There are a number of forms from digitally based platforms like Wikipedia, Linux, couch surfing and ride sharing through to the Arab Spring and occupy Wall Street. There are also links to the co-operative movement and community initiatives like transition towns and permacultural living.

A case study is presented examining one type of peer to peer group in more detail to reveal practical issues of operating within this new paradigm. The Convergence gathering is a group of people interested in alternative lifestyles that has met for five or six days over the New Year in North Canterbury, New Zealand for almost thirty years. It has developed an organisational style with no ongoing structured leadership.

 


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Socially Responsible, Sustainable Development (Systemic Doubts)
Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Socially Responsible, Sustainable Development (Systemic Doubts)
Presenter / Artist
avatar for Ricardo Barrera

Ricardo Barrera

Professor, IDEI - UNTDF
ISSS Dev


Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Three Constructs of Systems Thinking for Better Governing a Globalized World in the Anthropocene

Living in a globalized society implies that political thinking necessarily extends beyond the national level to reach us in our roles as citizens of the world. Living in today’s globalized society also requires a new level of political thinking commensurate with the complexity of its challenges. To overcome the many difficulties we, and the planet we live on, face in the Anthropocene era, it has become incumbent on human beings to practice systems thinking. This paper will examine how general systemic thinking, critical systems thinking, and whole healing systems thinking can help us both comprehend and overcome these challenges.

Keywords: Global citizen, cosmopolitanism, globalization, Anthropocene, Earth System, systems theory


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
From 1978 Jennifer started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing until 1993. In 1989, moving to San Jose, Jennifer graduated in 1992 from the MSc in Cybernetic Systems at San Jose State University. Moving back to the UK in 1993, she worked... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 14:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

13:30 CEST

Life Itself: A Relational Theory

Background: Robert Rosen claimed that the existence of life can be explained in terms of closed causal relations. This is quite a different approach from explaining life in terms of behavior alone. It defines life in terms of the way a system is "organized" across all levels of causation. In his book "Life Itself" Rosen described a minimum "organization" of relations between natural causes that could be called alive. His study of life followed along two lines of reasoning: (1) that causal organization can be described in Mathematics prior to quantification (using Category Theory), and (2) that all living systems involve "Modeling Relations" that are "anticipatory".  He did not integrate these two tracks in his work, but left that to his followers. He did, however, give many hints on how to do it, one being his diagram of a "Metabolism-Repair (M-R) System," another his diagram of a modeling relation. He explained that such systems cannot exist within the mathematical restrictions we adopted to describe a strictly mechanistic world (the Modernist view). There is a great deal we can learn from this initial work, and following Rosen's leads we can also move forward with developing a relational theory applicable to any system. We will examine the initial steps in doing that, as thoroughly as possible in 4 hours.

Workshop Agenda:

This workshop will be based on examining the four cause relational entailment structure outlined in Robert Rosen’s work in Category Theory entailments and Modeling Relations – that is, linking entailment with relation to form a meta-model of a ‘whole’ system that may also have the fundamental properties of life. We will go through the foundations of this idea and recent developments that seem very promising for articulating a theory of whole systems. The approach not only realizes Rosen’s concepts, but also the initial insight of Arthur Koestler working with Ludvig von Bertalanffy, into a new theoretical object that he called the “Holon”.

The Workshop will be conducted mainly as an interactive tutorial. Since there is a lot of difficult material to cover, there will not be time for a contributed paper stream. We may be able to integrate short, highly relevant contributions from participants by prior arrangement.

Hour One:  Definitions and Philosophical World View

In this section we will explore the fundamentally different perspectives of traditional science and relational science. We will see how ‘ontology’  (how we imagine nature to be) determines ‘epistemology’ (what we can learn about it); and how ‘crises’ arise when learning challenges those basic assumptions, leading to advances science to new paradigms. We will trace the key discoveries that shook up the modernist/positivist worldview and the surprising source of inspiration from our own ancient past that led to our post-modern view of physics. We will then see how that transition was ‘just enough’ for physics but not enough for biology, and we will examine how, by capturing more of the deep causality view, we can create a  new analytical method for understanding whole systems in terms of whole systems, using relational mathematics. We will thus discover the “relational holon”.

Hour Two:  Relational Frameworks

Armed with a basic ability to step into the relational universe, we will, in this section, examine mathematical constructions and deconstructions that derive from the relational holon, and how this view can provide a framework for conducting systems research. We will also compare this framework to many other research frameworks that are in surprising agreement but nevertheless remain isolated in different disciplines, despite their profound collective implication of a general pattern in nature.

Hour Three:  Methods and techniques

In this section we will introduce and discuss methods for applying relational analysis to problems, giving examples, and allowing participants to analyze a case of their own choosing. We will collectively explore methods and discuss their further development in various technical domains. We will also consider implications of the framework for coupling research models and establishing a new kind of informatics architecture.

Hour Four:  Case Studies

In the final section we will discuss results of our own case study attempts and compare them with other prepared examples. We will end with an open discussion of the utility of relational modeling and directions for future development, including its potential linkage to other approaches and contribution to the goal of finding a General System Theory.

It is highly recommended that workshop participants explore the following references prior to the workshop, and come equipped with relevant questions and/or insights:

Baianu, I.C. (2006) Robert Rosen’s Work and Complex Systems Biology. Axiomathes, 16, 25–34.

Checkland, P. (1988) The case for “holon.” Systemic Practice and Action Research, 1, 235–238.

Cilliers, P., Biggs, H.C., Blignaut, S., Choles, A.G., Hofmeyr, J.-H.S., Jewitt, G.P. & Roux, D.J. (2013) Complexity, modeling, and natural resource management. Ecology and Society, 18, 1.

Cornish-Bowden, A. (2006) Putting the Systems Back into Systems Biology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 49, 475–489.

Cornish-Bowden, A. (2015) Tibor Gánti and Robert Rosen: contrasting approaches to the same problem. Journal of theoretical biology.

Cornish-Bowden, A. & Cárdenas, M.L. (2008) Self-organization at the origin of life. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 252, 411–418.

Cornish-Bowden, A. & Cárdenas, M.L. (2005) Systems biology may work when we learn to understand the parts in terms of the whole. Biochem.Soc.Trans., 33, 516–519.

Edmonds, B. (2007) The Practical Modelling of Context-Dependent Causal Processes – A Recasting of Robert Rosen’s Thought. Chemistry & Biodiversity, 4, 2386–2395.

Edwards, M.G. (2005) The integral holon: A holonomic approach to organisational change and transformation. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 18, 269–288.

Hoffmeyer, J. (1997) Biosemiotics: Towards a new synthesis in biology. European Journal for Semiotic Studies, 9, 355–376.

Hoffmeyer, J. (2001) Life and reference. Biosystems, 60, 123–130.

Hofmeyr, J.-H.S. (2011) Relational humanism. The Humanist Imperative in South Africa, 181.

Hofmeyr, J.-H.S. (2007) The biochemical factory that autonomously fabricates itself: a systems biological view of the living cell. A: Boogerd, F. C, 217–242.

Kineman, J.J. (2011) Relational Science: A Synthesis. Axiomathes, 21, 393–437.

Kineman, J.J. (2012a) R-Theory: A Synthesis of Robert Rosen’s Relational Complexity. Systems Research and Behavioral Science, 29, 527–538.

Kineman, J.J. (2012b) The Ontology of Anticipation. Anticipatory systems: philosophical, mathematical, and methodological foundations IFSR international series on systems science and engineering., Springer, New York.

Kineman, J.J. & Poli, R. (2014) Ecological Literacy Leadership: Into the Mind of Nature. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, 95, 30–58.

Koestler, A. (1969) Beyond atomism and holism: the concept of the holon. Beyond reductionism, 192–232.

Louie, A.H. & Poli, R. (2011) The spread of hierarchical cycles. International Journal of General Systems, 40, 237–261.

Luz Cárdenas, M., Letelier, J.-C., Gutierrez, C., Cornish-Bowden, A. & Soto-Andrade, J. (2010) Closure to efficient causation, computability and artificial life. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 263, 79–92.

Miller, R., Poli, R. & Rossel, P. (2013) The Discipline of Anticipation: Exploring Key Issues, UNESCO, Paris.

Nadin, M. (2010) Anticipation and dynamics: Rosen’s anticipation in the perspective of time. International Journal of General Systems, 39, 3–33.

Poli, R. (2010a) An introduction to the ontology of anticipation. Futures, 42, 769–776.

Poli, R. (2009) The complexity of anticipation. Balkan Journal of Philosophy, 19–29.

Poli, R. (2010b) The Complexity of Self-reference. A Critical Evaluation of Luhmann’s Theory of Social Systems.

Rosen, R. (2012) Anticipatory systems: philosophical, mathematical, and methodological foundations, 2nd ed. Springer, New York.

Rosen, R. (1993a) Drawing the Boundary Between Subject and Object: Comments on the Mind-Brain Problem. Theoretical Medicine, 14, 89–100.

Rosen, R. (1999) Essays on Life Itself, Columbia University Press, New York, NY.

Rosen, R. (1991) Life itself: a comprehensive inquiry into the nature, origin, and fabrication of life, Columbia University Press.

Rosen, R. (1993b) On models and modeling. Applied Mathematics and Computation, 56, 359–372.

Rosen, R. (1994) On Psychomimesis. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 171, 87–92.

Rosen, R. (1990) The Modeling Relation and natural law. Mathematics and Science, pp. 183–199. World Scientific Publishing.

 

...

Speakers
JK

John Kineman

SIG Chair: Relational Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South AfricaAdjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, IndiaPresident (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences ISSS SIG Chair: Relational ScienceDr... Read More →

ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational ScienceJudith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 13:30 - 15:30 CEST
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Biodiversity 0.2 – a Smart Invertebrate or Computing the Wild Life City in the Anthropocene

The paper presents one part of the series and research project ‘Socio-Ecological Systems: advancing tools, language, and architecture for designing the gestaltung of systems’, with emphasis on the Anthropocene, human habitat and urban ecologies. The subject complements ‘Architectural Ecologies – code, culture and technology at the convergence’ (EMCSR 2014), concepts of material and social behavior based on structural organization as decision-making parameters for urban design strategies in the cyborgian city (IS4IS 2015) and a critical vision of the hacked body, equipped with super-smart bio-digital material triggering a fundamental change of its role as humanoid cyborg in a conversing environment (Digital Bauhaus Summit 2015).

 “Biodiversity 0.2 – a smart invertebrate or computing the wild life city in the Anthropocene” suggests design principles for creating a future habitat for all species, including organic, human, animal and computational devices. The latter describing a rather novel and advancing typology.

The concept of biodiversity has emerged strongly during the hippiesque and technophil 1970s, featuring the birth of the Urban Ecology movement, the era of the ‘Whole Earth Catalogue’ (1968) hand in hand with Buckminster Fuller’s ‘Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth’ (1969) and the beginning of extra-terrestrial travel where punch-cards described the interface for a new, a digital human condition (Apollo 11). Biodiversity furthered itself globally with its political advent in November 1988, when the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) convened the Ad Hoc Working Group of Experts on Biological Diversity followed by the CBD (UN Convention on Biological Diversity) entering into force into December 1993.

At that stage the Anthropocene had been in full bloom; Government policies and regulations, educational strategies and infrastructural development have echoed and followed suit by addressing urban environments through implementing gardens and advancing bicycle paths in the city, prohibiting vehicles that emit polluting substances and generally fostering wild life in the city. And while decision-making bodies still focused on their exclusive and separate fields of expertise, developments in information and communication technology advanced to an interdisciplinary extend, breeding big data that has become too big to house or handle, creating the Internet of things that requires structuring and cultivating a culture in which participative design and open source information have become as usual as conversations between humans and machines.

The paper suggests that biodiversity can and must go further than the mere implementation of discrete spaces fostering nature in urban environments or the monitoring of natural habitat using digital devices, but a full integration into the material world. Natural organisms own an enormous amount of intelligence that we as humans have not yet understood. Principles suggested include an emergent information and living ecology based on biological performance merged with man-made technologies while keeping an eye on a bio-intelligent socio-ecological system design. The aim is to design systems where biological performance, bio-intelligence and an information network society can complement each others and understand the collaboration systemically, rather than individual and discrete.   


Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Forming Networked Social and Labor Relations in a Network Economy

tmedvedeva@mail.ru

The emergence of new social and labor relations in a time of globalization and network economy is a difficult and ambiguous phenomenon, and therefore many researchers have expressed serious concern about the fate of labor and social and labor relations. Globalization and computerization of the economy, the rapid dissemination of knowledge and the formation of universal interdependence have led to the possibility that while capital-based industries diffuse  worldwide, labor is less mobile. Many studies describe the deteriorating situation of workers, the atomization of individuals, individualization of labor, and the erosion of social capital. Workers' organizations, established in an era of an industrial economy, are destroyed or weakened. This violates the principle of equality of opportunity of all key players in social and labor relations to represent and protect their interests.

How does the emergence of a new economy alter the social dialogue between labor and capital? Are we seeing the end of a collective consciousness among workers, amid more individualistic behavior?  The participants in social and labor relations are now in conditions where they are forced to learn the principles of network organization and in this way have the opportunity and responsibility to protect their interests in the new economy. This article explores how the forming of a network economy influences social and labor relations.  It identifies the organizational foundations and principles of social and labor relations in the emerging new economy.  It reviews the influence of culture on how networked social and labor relations are formed using Russia as an example. It considers ways to solve problems in the field of social and labor relations on both organizational and theoretical levels.

Keywords: social and labor relations; economic globalization; network economy; dialogue between labor and capital; an extended system approach.

 


Moderators
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Harnessing IHRD Trainers' Integral Capacities for Problem Resolving and Possibility Emergence: The Case Study of an Integral Action Learning Program Designed in World Café 2.0

In the past decade, claim for unleashing organizational capacities no longer  focuses on explicating the nature of problem structures and the way problems being framed. More and more emphasis is placed on uncovering the levels of organizational consciousness or cultivation of organizational spirit. While applying systems archetypes to depict the structural patterns underlying most organizational problems, organizational leaders and HRD trainers might be led to problem-focus or outcome-focus, instead of emergence-focus, from which possibilities and opportunities might arise. They tend to neglect the fact that what prohibits most organizational development or social transformation is not the problems themselves, but how we, the stakeholders of the whole society, relate to one another and the problems. Through a deeper understanding of the complexity of problem would help clarify how problems could be transformed into possibilities. Furthermore, clarifying our roles in the making of problems and how our mentalities shape these roles would help uncover the causes of these problems.

Adam Kahane, who is a gifted facilitator specializing in cross-sector dialogue and scenario building, proclaims three types of increasing complexity as the root of organizations’ and societies’ toughest problems. They are dynamic complexity, social complexity and generative complexity, which could be observed in profit, non-profit, and most governmental organizations. Once we could not see the relationship between cause and effect of any of our decision, we would lose insight into such “dynamic complexity” and feel powerless, helpless or hopeless when the problems keep emerge and distance in time and space still block our relating cause to effect. He contends that “social complexity” often emerges in an organization of diverse stakeholders with different agendas and worldviews. Especially in the globalizing society when multiplicity is highly embraced and divergence advocated, conflicting differences could be either disguised under the value of plurality or resolved with superficial dialogues. Most important of all, when we face the emergent realities wherein solutions from the past no longer fit, we will be seeing realities with old, existing mental frames and locked in “ generative complexity”.

However, how could people with different mentalities, visions and paradigmic thinking work together to facing the various types of thorny problems? When power struggle is disguised in democracy, how could the government engage divergent stakeholders to listen to each other? How could the government identify the numerous constellations of minds and souls in the public?

In this presentation, the author suggest that one of the most critical approaches to bridge the gap between government effectiveness and public needs is to create a new dialogical platform, allowing a new language for communication and negotiation. Indeed, there are many approaches to harnessing such an enabling langue for collaborative inquiries for intercultural or cross-organizational learning, such as appreciative inquiry, open space, future search, whole scale change and world café. Instead of taking any of these forms, the author integrates the Chinese Golden Circle Philosophy, Theory U, and Integral Theory to design an integral form of collective thinking and dialogue, coined as the World Café 2.0. The World Café 2.0 is designed to harness the IHRD trainers’ systems thinking and integral capacities to transform problems into possibilities or searching opportunities inherent in these problems. To achieve this, the author will juxtapose problems and possibilities in cross-cultural and cross-organizational contexts and design a holistic model for integral action learning to bridge gap between government and public. Below are the strategies of such a holistic design model:

Enabling the deep questioning abilities through U Journey

Resolving value conflicts through both Chinese and Western Golden Circle

Uncovering the world views inherent in collective thinking and action

Engaging in holistic design through collaborative inquiry with integral spirit

The author will demonstrate how such a holistic model could be applied to foster creative dialogue and envisioning action in the context of divergent contexts. Indeed, the unique challenge of today is to articulate such an underlying integrative culture, and enact its cultivation for global creativity and prominence.

Although we may not know well how such an integrative culture might actually develop and work in the long run, it seems clear that a deep integrative model must emerge, at least in part, from synthesizing across diverse wisdom traditions-west and east, north and south, indigenous and contemporary. For example, more and more cross-cultural and cross-civilization dialogues are occurring in different fields. Synthesizing different cultural traditions characterizes the works of more and more renowned artists, scholars, writers, scientists and creative managers in multinational enterprises.

Keywords: Integral Theory, Theory U, Action Learning, Collective Dialogue, World Café 2.0


Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

SIG Chair: Leadership and Systemic Innovation, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director... Read More →

Speakers
ML

MingFen Li

ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Sense-Making between and across Stakeholder Perspectives

The CX Tool© provides a visual tool for creating congruence between what is known and what is done within a socio-technical system. It guides the analyst by identifying six elements contained within organizational intelligence and performance management dimensions. Three elements define within Organizational Intelligence: Essential Ideas; Essential Processes, Protocols, Structures; and Essential Assessments/Audits. Three elements define Performance Management: Essential Actions; Essential Standards; and Essential Deliverables. The CX Tool© allows analysts to assign congruency scores between elements horizontally and vertically while allowing comparisons between current and desired state of the system. Yet, the CX Tool© does not distinguish between stakeholders’ perspectives, a feature that, when faced with complex and/or complicated systems, may prove critical. In this research the authors propose a conceptual framework to incorporate different stakeholders’ perspectives into the CX Tool©. A short case study is presented to illustrate how different stakeholders’ perspectives can be incorporated and quantified.

Keywords: CX tool, pluralism, sense-making, system congruence


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
From 1978 Jennifer started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing until 1993. In 1989, moving to San Jose, Jennifer graduated in 1992 from the MSc in Cybernetic Systems at San Jose State University. Moving back to the UK in 1993, she worked... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:00 CEST

Systemic Approach to Examine the Relationship Between Structure, Conduct and Performance Model of Agriculture in Africa, Evidence from Ghana
Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Choosing Boundaries for Interventions in Open Dynamic Systems

It is no easy task for a planner to choose a boundary for intervening in an open and dynamic system. As the system is continuously reshaped through complex interactions with its surroundings, the planner cannot be certain that any chosen boundary will continue to be relevant or appropriate into the future. Since Churchman first emphasized the importance of boundary judgments, many systems theorists and practitioners have urged planners to recognise the subjectivity and plurality of boundary definitions. Accordingly, the planner’s boundary must accommodate diverse views and values that are also changing. The planner thus faces the question: what kind of intervention would enable improvement for all, while also remaining relevant and flexible under changing conditions?

This presentation summarizes findings from my PhD study, which explores the planner’s challenge through a case study—the improvement of river health in the Murray-Darling Basin in South East Australia. Water management within the Murray-Darling Basin is embroiled in the tension between a highly variable climate, the historical development of a productive agricultural economy, and the progressive degradation of riverine ecosystems. Within this context, the planner seeks to improve ‘river health’, which is conceived as a balance between competing uses of water. Applying Ulrich’s critical system heuristics to unfold boundary judgements in policy documents, scientific studies, and those of planners and stakeholders with diverse interests, I found that: there is no single definition of ‘river health’ that is likely to be achievable or acceptable to all; and there is no single boundary that is the most appropriate choice for improving river health. Interventions that seek to increase control by defining tight boundaries around river health, ironically increase their own vulnerability to failure.

Inspired by the work of Francine Hughes and colleagues in river restoration, and Emery Roe’s analysis of the debate on sustainable development, I propose that interventions in open dynamic systems are more likely to be effective if they are based on open boundaries. In other words, interventions must embrace open-ended goals; and be designed and managed on a case-by-case basis, according to local circumstances. But then, is there an appetite for open-ended approaches that consider improvement as a journey with NO destination, and planning as ‘inside-out’, rather than top-down or bottom-up?


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
From 1978 Jennifer started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing until 1993. In 1989, moving to San Jose, Jennifer graduated in 1992 from the MSc in Cybernetic Systems at San Jose State University. Moving back to the UK in 1993, she worked... Read More →

Speakers
SK

Saideepa Kumar

PhD Student
ISSS Student


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Community Self-Organisation; How to Make it more Effective?

Communities are parts of larger social contexts that may inhibit or support their satisfactory self-organisation. Members of a community share to different degrees common interests, such as housing services, sports facilities, good quality environment or indeed myriad of other concerns. For all these interest they need to organise themselves to achieve collectively what individually they are unable to achieve.

Community agents constitute these situations. Shared interests trigger communications among them and between them and public, third sectors and private services. Agents form networks and the focus of this contribution is on the characteristics and quality of their relations. The evolution of these relations is by and large the outcome of self-organisation; it is not difficult to understand that their complexity makes it is difficult if not impossible to plan them. They need enabling, and support. Agents can enable their self-organisation through their own resources and creativity or through the support of external agents, such researchers, NGOs, government agencies, private trusts, philanthropy or others forms of support. Accepting that self-organisation is inherent to the complexity of social processes, the challenge for us is to work out how to make these self-organising processes more effective. How can citizens of a community improve the quality of their own interactions? How can these citizens co-create desirable values in their interactions with external enablers, such as organisation and policy-makers? 

For instance, the impact of a policy in a community may be skewed in the benefit of those citizens that are better prepared articulate their needs. Better education and competencies make them more visible an influential to Government agencies, which require organised citizens in order to direct their resources and achieve better policy performance. Resources are more likely to be directed towards the citizens with more self-organising capabilities, at the expense of those with fewer competencies. In these circumstances local self-organisation may be precisely in the detriment of those in more need (Espejo and Mendiwelso-Bendek, 2011).  Well intentioned policies may end up increasing operational imbalances within the community to the detriment of justice and fairness. In practice this requires that additionally to implementing services such as education, health, housing and so forth, it is necessary to consider policies enabling balanced self-organisation in the community, aiming at community members with similar participatory strengths regardless of their history, race or gender.  It is necessary redressing imbalances in communities’ self-organisation. This approach may improve not only self-organisation within the community but also the quality of this community’s relations with those organisations creating, regulating and producing policies relevant to them. In summary it is necessary to improve self-organisation processes within community groups at the same time of improving the community’s influence in value co-creation with relevant external agents. The latter imply self-organising process that often highlights imbalances in power relations (Mayo, Mendiwelso-Bendek and Packham, 2013, p237-8). However, in this contribution our main focus is on exploring aspects of self-organisation within communities to highlight strategies to overcome imbalances in participatory processes.  

References

Espejo, R, Mendiwelso-Bendek, Z. (2011) An argument for active citizenship and organisational transparency, in Kybernetes Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 477-493

Mayo M, Mendiwelso-Bendek Z and Packham C (2013) Eds and authors. Community Research as Community Development, Palgrave ISBN-13: 978-1137034731


Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Environmental Mindfulness Enacted in the Green Silk Road Initiative

Prime Maison Fujimidai 410 1-25 Fujimidai Chikusa-ku Nagoya, Japan 464-0015 iroth@saybrook.edu

This paper will concern itself with rites of passage, in particular focusing on those embedded in various schooling and educational systems and used to signify initiation.  It will investigate how, as educational elements, such rites exist, are practiced, and remain significant in an increasingly anthropocentric world.  The paper will begin by discussing a particular case: that of Japan’s entrance examination system.  It will show how this system once served as an initiatory rite of passage, playing an important role in the mental and emotional health of individuals as well as in the functioning of the society at large.  The paper with then move into an investigation of contemporary Japan exploring how, over the last two decades, entrance examinations have fallen ever further into disuse.  This trend will then be shown to correlate with the development of overly dependent, asocial, and/or self-destructive behavioural trends among young Japanese.  The possible connections between Japan’s disappearing rite of passage and its growing troubles with its younger generations will be explored and interpretations based on a framework rooted in anthropology and existential psychology will be offered.   In order to develop a richer and more complex understanding of the trends in question, the paper will then compare Japan to both Korea and the United States applying the same framework to further explore how initiatory rites of passage can act as leverage points in the production of social trends. It will conclude by inquiring as to whether an active approach to the design and implementation of initiatory rites of passage would be an ethical and advisable strategy for reforming education. 


Moderators
avatar for Prof. Alexander Laszlo

Prof. Alexander Laszlo

SIG Chair: Leadership and Systemic Innovation, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires
SIG Chair:    Curating Emergence for Thrivability Board of Trustees' Representative, International Society for the Systems SciencesAlexander Laszlo, PhD, is the 57th President and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS),  Director... Read More →

Speakers
ML

MingFen Li

ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Open
Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

14:30 CEST

Relevance of Stakeholders for Tourism Management: The Case of the El Chico National Park, Hidalgo, Mexico

El Chico National Park (ECNP) is one of the most important protected areas in the state of Hidalgo. Tourism management of this protected area involves numerous stakeholders with different needs, resources and perceptions of nature. There are four forest communities that are involved in the tourist use of this park, but other stakeholders are also behind tourism activity in this PA: federal government agencies, state government agencies, municipalities, unorganized smallholder entrepreneurs. Tourism management of this protected area is a complex issue, particularly, when decision-making process is centralised by government bodies. This study explores the relationships’ structure among government agencies and community tourist associations (CTA) based on the tourism management of El Chico National Park.  This study presents a descriptive analysis of collaborative networks among ECNP’s stakeholders, using a qualitative research.

Keywords: tourism management, government bodies, collaborative networks, stakeholders, protected areas.


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 14:30 - 15:00 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

How to Eliminating Adverse Selection Action? Comparative Analysis on Credit Evaluation System and Guarantee System in Chinese E-Commerce Market

Compared to the traditional market, the e-commerce transaction still could not get rid of information asymmetry between the online sellers and online buyers. Adverse selection actions brought by information asymmetry have negative impact on e-marketing and reduce the efficiency of the online transaction. Now website such as TAOBAO (http://www.taobao.com) are seeking ways to reduce adverse selection action. Widely used approaches are credit scoring system and guarantee system. This paper takes transaction data from U disk market in TAOBAO as samples and analyzes the role of credit scoring system and guarantee system in Chinese e-commerce market. The results showed that the credit scoring system and guarantee system can effectively counteract negative effect from the adverse selection actions. Although the credit scoring system has a significant impact on transaction volume; guarantee system has greater impact on the trading volume than the credit scoring systems. In addition, relationship between the guarantee system and credit scoring system are not substitutes but complement for each other. In the case of the existence of the guarantee system, online consumers’ purchase for online goods options is still subject to the impact of the credit scoring system. The paper proposes thoughts to improve credit scoring system and guarantee systems to promote the efficiency of e-marketing in China.

Keywords: credit scoring system, guarantee system, adverse selection action


Moderators
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Open
Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Paper Session 4
Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

Reinventing Democracy in the Digital Era using Third-Phase Science

The world’s future depends on its youth. Yet over the past several decades, the election process has suffered from a continual decrease in participation levels, particularly among young people. Democracy of the 21st Century refers almost exclusively to the right of citizens to take part in the official political process. Structured Democratic Dialogue Co-Laboratories in 2012, with young people based in Cyprus and Greece, and representatives of European youth organizations, as well as a series of Structured Democratic Dialogue Co-Laboratories with young people from 10 European countries in 2008 identified (1) Corruption and Lack of Transparency; (2)The Political System is ‘outdated’, and not evolving while everything else is, especially with regards to technology and ICT; and (3) Lack of a humanistic vision and of a feeling of purpose among the youth, in connection with the lack of confidence that they can achieve a change, as the root obstacles. The 160 young participants engaged in these 5-day long Co-Laboratories produced over 400 ideas and invested over 3,000 person hours to explore the relations between these ideas with the aim of collectively identifying the key underlying problems. The current venture, “Reinventing democracy in the digital era,” funded by the UN Democracy Fund, aspires to engage more than a thousand young people and about 100 media-, policy- and science experts from across the world in face-to-face week-long, as well as hybrid and virtual Co-Laboratories with the aim to invent a new system of democratic governance that will satisfy the aspirations of all people and will abide to the requirements imposed by the Anthropocene. The methodological approach is grounded in the science of dialogic design, the principles of third-phase science, and network theory. The dialogues are taking place in Europe, Africa, The Americas, Asia-Australia and the MENA region. The participants will be producing two collectively authored eBooks, one “50 Reasons why youth do not participate in political life” and the second “50 Descriptors of an ideal future system of governance,” as well as a “Manifesto for 21st Century Democracy: Requirements of new system of democracy.” The extensive exploitation of social media technologies will lead to the production of hundreds of 1-min video clips that will serve towards engaging a few thousand people in evaluating and selecting ideas using modern social media and Apps. This is envisioned as the launching of a global mobilization process, which will engage thousands of people in critical and reflecting thinking by sharing and discussing the video clips. The results of the voting process will be disseminated to the media, organizations and decision makers through various communication channels and are expected to make an impact in the global political agenda. The project directors aspire to engage ISSS scientists as mentors for young participants, as researchers and as advisors to the project.

 


Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →

Speakers
YL

Yiannis Laouris

Chair, Future Worlds Center
ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:00 CEST

The General Theory of X-Dynamics Systemicity

"The Bioethism paradigm" (acronym for Biology-Ethology, ecology - Humanism) fosters universal specificities relative to the complexity of Life's processing, which in form of open systems, appeared on Earth from biochemical components and survival proprieties within propitious physicochemical environmental forces (J.-J. Blanc 1996).

For reference, the author’s past proceedings were developed - part after part since 2004 - as the structure and chapters of a “General Theory of Metadynamics Systemicity”. Its building blocks are being centered on the Universe diversity of x-dynamics: petadynamics teradynamics, gigadynamics’, metadynamics’, dynamics’, microdynamics’ and nanodynamics’ systemicity.  The set of X-dynamics are, in physics, multipliers defined in powers of 1015 to 10-6, proceeding in increments of three orders of magnitude (10' or 1`000), such as: peta, giga, meta, kilo, micro, nano...

The publication of these works is meant to support the acquisition of a large transdisciplinary understanding of the “x-dynamics’ systemicity world” that sustains the whole evolution of the Universe system’s components as well as those of live entities (things, objects, individuals), while perceiving and experiencing sets of forces and fluxes. This is why the theory of Systemicity emerged from synergies as applying the principles of “The Bioethism Transdisciplinary Paradigm of Universal Systems” down to ”Living systems” both having their specific temporal survival” that the author J.-J. Blanc developed since 1996.

 “Systemicity” is a notion that surges from interrelation, interaction, intrication…within interdependent synergies. The systemicity of atomic and molecular cycles has made and sustains both cosmic systems and Life’s cycles on planet Earth along differential time periods (trillion of light-years to less than hours) and their specific retroactivity.

Intrication is the quantum entanglement of a physical phenomenon that occurs when pairs or groups of particles are generated or interact in ways such that the quantum state of each particle cannot be described independently — instead, a quantum state may be given for the system as a whole, in other ways its metabolism status. Measurements of physical properties such as position, momentum, spin, polarization, etc. performed on entangled particles are found to be appropriately correlated.

The different parts of “X-dynamics Systemicity” are developed through a new “reading grid” of natural structures and behaviors of entities, objects and things as adapting from “neighboring’” within “neighborhoods” (ecosystems) where they specifically cope with endogenous and exogenous events and forces inducing to the retroactive temporal restructuring of  their structure and behavioral aptitudes (as in part 6).

Neighboring is “to associate in a neighborly way, to communicate with, to live side by side with, and to overlook. Biological molecule sequences, as neighboring, are participating in the structuring and the evolution of “cosmobjects”(JJB), organism, species and entities along their reproduction abilities. It infers nature and extent of selective forces as driving the evolving shaping of atom sets and genes (mutations). In other words, as in this part 7, “survival means” possess diverse perception, memory and experience tools that empower their adaptability to the permanency of all things to happen and change, i.e.:  they possess means as how to “give sense to things around from their interpretation of what’s perceived. The choice of the sense given can be lethal or propitious to them as surviving.

 In order to exist, both objects and living creatures replicate and evolve thanks to their perception and feeling tools within global, glocal and local areas (ecosystems) and by their natural components which form their structures and behaviors. Resulting actions and gene mutations are permanently changing both the endogen milieu and external environmental ecosystems metabolism and components quality (e.g.: means used from vision giving out the formation of a move or a feeling driving to its systemicity result like fear; the gravity effect of two masses as sustaining a balanced equilibrium…).

Then on, through ecosystems’ 3D multi-layers, from proto-organisms to humans, their individualities have specific social traits and behavioral statuses that account for the diversity of species to get developed and/or to get extinct. For example, when the Earth became a "snowball" from a nearly total glaciation (-600 Mo/y), the survival of some neighboring bacteria and micro-organisms escaping the drastic extinction of most species, conversely perceiving ways of adaptation, boosted up an extraordinary explosion of marine species bearing quite new functions (- 545Mo/y), that then after volcanic holes progressively reheated the planet from the systemicity of sets of interrelated metadynamics.

The Universe’s global environment generates x-dynamics such as cosmic petadynamics (black holes? Black energy?), teradynamics, gigadynamics and metadynamics cycles... in form of systemic forces, fluxes and moves occur within immense gas and particles neighborhoods. Interrelated, they are some of the main physicochemical cosmic, galactic, stellar, planetary and terrestrial feedback synergies from which x-dynamics systemicity retroactions emerge (i.e. rock cycles). Sets of systemicity results make atoms and molecules to participate in the structuring of matter and cosmic objects (nebulae, baby stars, stars and planets, waters and rocks), within a molecular world that originated from and after the “Big Bang”.

Furthermore, the physicochemical neighboring conditions for planet Earth to stabilize within the “Sun’s green belt” was a balanced thermodynamics environment state issued from the presence of the Moon at the right distance so as to  become propitious for Life to “hatch”. Such favorable position, sustaining the Earth and Life evolution by development of x- dynamic adaptive pathways, is going on with objects survival cycles, forces, fluxes, moves and matter that are “perceiving, giving sense and experiencing” things in several synergetic manners, (e.g. plants  natural emotional intelligence. . .). Perception tools are organic features treating signals- like neurons- or other microtubule as protein links. Microtubules are a component of the cytoskeleton, found throughout the cytoplasm. The microtubule can dynamically switch between growing and shrinking phases in this region (“search and capture model”), a matter of neighboring milieu.

Life as a whole and living entities, while neighboring around, are confronted with gravitation, electromagnetism, chemical and physical phenomena, and particularly with temperature and the “thermodynamics of entropy”. Filtering their milieu symptoms and their environmental events signals, living creatures develop means of perception in ways their inner systems and organs such as the immune one, emotional brain with amygdala and reptilian area or vision with eyes are well fit drivers for supporting their survival behaviors.

The neighboring areas (mille-feuille as 4D-networks) are diverse but concomitant producing forces and fluxes that are dynamical drivers within the diverse ecosystems. Their systemicity results from actions of coalescence, conjunction, co-evolution, convergence, symbiosis, percolation, phase transition or threshold output, neighborhood adaptation, etc. Universally, these actions and mechanisms concern atomic, molecular and physicochemical world’s permanently provoking feedback that drives the evolution of systemicity cycles and perception means. Because of the development of similarities in unrelated matters or organisms present in similar environments, a balanced equilibrium is necessary to sustain the whole of things to survive temporally. The disappearance of a link along a food chain completely disorganizes the ecosystem’s metabolism endangering its sustainability.

Specific bonds and traits of structure and behaviors, as well as evolution trends of “surviving objects and living creatures” require certain knowledge and a memory about actions-reactions (drivers) from ago-antagonistic signals and stimuli in order to give the propitious answer to things. Issued from ecosystemic and socio-systemic metabolism and environmental statuses (climate, predator preys networks of food chains…), these signals sustain things on thanks to the x-dynamics systemic retroactivity reigning about.

One may easily understand here that human sociology shows such neighboring comportments and effects, observing then they are universally giving sense to what happens, adapting survival tools with evolution necessities and this thanks to their perception capacities (instinct…) and kind of memory qualities so as to give sense to things.

Keywords: systemicity, survival, metadynamics, symbiosis, feedback, entropy, metabolism, synergy, convergence, coalescence, neighboring, perception, sense, organs.

...

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
From 1978 Jennifer started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing until 1993. In 1989, moving to San Jose, Jennifer graduated in 1992 from the MSc in Cybernetic Systems at San Jose State University. Moving back to the UK in 1993, she worked... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:00 - 15:30 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

15:30 CEST

Tea/Coffee break and Poster Viewing
Please take the time to look at the poster presentations in Aurora 2 & 3 during breaks, discuss and connect with one another or speak to one of our "Get social" specialists at the reception desk to get help with the conference technology.

Tuesday August 4, 2015 15:30 - 16:00 CEST
Coffee Break Area Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Crisis Science for Sustainability

Sustainability science requires interdisciplinary and even trans-disciplinary frameworks for research in order to shift from disciplinary and sectorial studies to more appropriate ways of understanding whole system sustainability. While this shift is difficult to achieve within current traditions, an actual crisis seems to trigger many of the characteristics that would also be appropriate for holistic science. Disciplinary research tends to be the norm when we have a carefully planned research agenda and well-posed questions; but when we don’t know the questions, as is the case in a crisis, we instinctively invoke trans-disciplinary modes of learning. We may thus learn a great deal about system sustainability and system research by looking at the characteristics of ‘crisis science’. Here we review personal experience from scientific responses to oil spills in the 1970's.We suggest a general framework in terms of R-Theory (Kineman, 2012), which is a relational holon theory based on four archetypal domains corresponding to Aristotle’s general explanatory hierarchy and many other similar frameworks that have been developed separately in various disciplines and perennial philosophy. We propose general development of “Crisis Science” as a complex systems research field that has strong parallels with holistic paradigms many are struggling to establish in ecology and environmental management. Not only is there a strong theoretical affinity between these two domains, but by promoting Crisis Science publically and in mainstream programs, funding may be more easily obtained for critical integrated research that supports both purposes. As part of a Crisis Science research program it is necessary to train between crisis responses, and shared principles and methods are possible across many holistic problems we face otherwise in anticipation of possible crises. Pursued together, Crisis Science and Holistic Science can establish the Anticipatory capacity we need to avoid crises.

Keywords: crisis science, oil spills, action research, system sustainability, complexity, holistic thought. 


Speakers
JK

John Kineman

SIG Chair: Relational Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South AfricaAdjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, IndiaPresident (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences ISSS SIG Chair: Relational ScienceDr... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Initiatory Rites of Passage as Leverage Points: A Comparative Investigation of Symbolic Meaning in the Japanese School System

This paper will concern itself with rites of passage, in particular focusing on those embedded in various schooling and educational systems and used to signify initiation.  It will investigate how, as educational elements, such rites exist, are practiced, and remain significant in an increasingly anthropocentric world.  The paper will begin by discussing a particular case: that of Japan’s entrance examination system.  It will show how this system once served as an initiatory rite of passage, playing an important role in the mental and emotional health of individuals as well as in the functioning of the society at large.  The paper with then move into an investigation of contemporary Japan exploring how, over the last two decades, entrance examinations have fallen ever further into disuse.  This trend will then be shown to correlate with the development of overly dependent, asocial, and/or self-destructive behavioural trends among young Japanese.  The possible connections between Japan’s disappearing rite of passage and its growing troubles with its younger generations will be explored and interpretations based on a framework rooted in anthropology and existential psychology will be offered.   In order to develop a richer and more complex understanding of the trends in question, the paper will then compare Japan to both Korea and the United States applying the same framework to further explore how initiatory rites of passage can act as leverage points in the production of social trends. It will conclude by inquiring as to whether an active approach to the design and implementation of initiatory rites of passage would be an ethical and advisable strategy for reforming education.

 


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ian Roth

Ian Roth

iroth@saybrook.edu,  
Educational design; systems ethics; Cross-cultural learning and communication


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Understanding and Managing Sustainability Transitions to an Energy Efficient Regime in Medium-Sized Cities
Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Erik Lindhult

Erik Lindhult

Mälardalen University
ISSS Two Day


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Using Boundary Critique in Commercial Software Projects

Software projects have long been driven by a list of perceived mandatory "requirements" representing the features the software must contain. But this one-dimensional view of the end product has proven problematic. Stakeholders battle to have their prized features included, while the true value of the initiative is often lost in the shuffle. This paper outlines a new incremental process actively being used in commercial software development making use of boundary critique. By viewing the end product as a multi-dimensional object we can proceed to identify the boundaries and then enlarge them, even to the point of delivering small portions of functionality every week during the development lifecycle.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Daryl Kulak

Daryl Kulak

SIG Chair: Human Systems Inquiry, Pillar Technology, LLC
I am interested in systems thinking as it relates to my work as a software consultant. I am also interested because I think we can change the world for the better using the techniques of systems thinking to their fullest.SIG Chair: Human Systems Inquiry (see below for information)Systems... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:00 CEST

Systems Thinking for Evaluating in the Anthropocene

The broad aim of this workshop is to provide some better preparation amongst systems thinking practitioners for opportunities of engaging with other professional fields of relevant practice.  The specific purpose is to enable systems practitioners to better understand contemporary challenges of evaluation through a brief systemic inquiry into alternative models of evaluation praxis.

Workshop participants will: 

gain a better understanding of what helps and hinders the uptake of systems thinking and complexity ideas amongst evaluators and commissioners, programme managers,  and policy makers;

acquire some practical experience in using a CSH-lite approach into ideal modelling;

understand the potential contribution of evaluation approaches in their systems practice

develop an initial platform for further exploration of purposeful systemic evaluation. 

Evaluation is the systematic, evidence-based assessment of the value, worth, merit and significance of a project, program, design or any form of intervention.  Evaluation is increasingly recognised as professionalised practise to support the implementation and development of policies, programmes and projects.   Over the past fifty years it has become an established craft; with 106 national associations of practitioners, with combined membership of many tens of thousands. 

Many evaluators,  policy makers and commissioners  particularly in domains of sustainable development and climate change acknowledge that ‘systems approaches’ and ‘recognition of complexity’ are needed.  Indeed to some extent ‘systems’ and ‘complexity’ have been anointed as the next big thing in evaluation.  Despite this, there is still limited actionable understanding of what that thing is, what to do with it, and – most importantly - what the implications are for evaluators and other stakeholders.

The three co-authors/ facilitators of the workshop have each had over ten years experience in working with evaluators promoting systems thinking in practice.  The workshop builds on these experiences, alongside those of workshop participants, in line with some findings from a small action research programme undertaken in the past year by the co-authors entitled ‘Helps and Hinders’. The research has been undertaken with members of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and the European Evaluation Society (EES) as well as other national and local evaluation professional bodies, to explore what helps with, and what hinders , the uptake of systems thinking and complexity ideas in evaluation practise.

Using these findings as a platform, the workshop design is based on a light-touch application of critical systems heuristics (what we call CSH-lite); a process of ideal design modelling capturing core influences of human systems intervention including (i) values, (ii) power, (iii) knowledge, and (iv) social legitimacy.  The workshop deliberations are orchestrated around an interactive mix of plenary discussion and mini-presentation, and small-group work modelling exercises.  After a short briefing on the helps and hinders research findings, participants will develop simple ideal models of better systemic evaluation based on conversations around (i) impact (cf. values), (ii) decision making (cf. power), and (iii) appropriate forms of know-how and expertise (cf. knowledge).  These group models are shared at plenary.  A final plenary conversation will explore the fourth dimension of  this CSH-lite enquiry - (iv) opportunities and challenges (‘helps and hinders’)  with implementing the idealised model (s) in the real world (cf. issues of social legitimacy). The discussion will explore ways in which to counter prevailing mindsets and politics that may impede systemic evaluation.

A maximum number of 40 participants is recommended for this workshop.  Prior registration on the workshop is strongly recommended in order to avoid disappointment.

 


Speakers
avatar for Richard Hummelbrunner

Richard Hummelbrunner

Senior Associate, OEAR Regionalberatung
In the past Richard Hummelbrunner has worked extensively as practitioner and advisor in the field of regional policy at various levels (local, national, EU, international development).During recent years Richard’s interest has shifted to evaluation, and has gained extensive experience... Read More →
avatar for Martin Reynolds

Martin Reynolds

Senior Lecturer, The Open University
Systems Thinking in Practice Postgraduate Qualifications Director Distance learning Developmental Evaluation ISSS Regular Environmental responsibility
avatar for Bob Williams

Bob Williams

Independent Consultant, Bob Williams
Independent consultant evaluator, based in New Zealand and holder of the current 2014 -15 Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award from the American Evaluation Association. Has worked for the past few years on ways to make the systems and evaluation fields more attractive to each other... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 18:00 CEST
Copenhagen 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

A System Architecting Approach that Is Based on Context, Value, Quality, Function, Structure and Process Perspectives

Architecture is both a design activity (process) as well as the schema of fundamental things about a system (work product).  As a design activity, architecture is the act of creating a representation of an unknown and original object whose properties (like technical aspects, formal and spatial structures) must be well enough understood in advance. As a work product, architecture is the structure of the components of a system, their interrelationships, externally visible properties of those components and principles and guidelines governing their design and evolution over time. Handling this duality and realizing architectural designs that improve the value of the solution within cost limitations; provisioning for evolution over the system lifetime; considering the needs of all stakeholders; and ensuring that the system is well matched to its environment are the typical responsibilities of Architects.

The outcome of Architecting process is the Architecture. Traditionally, this process provides general guidance to the Architect and utilizes an envelope of practices and design patterns that govern the Architecture creation. Its purpose is to aid the Architect to synthesize a solution that satisfies the requirements and it is the responsibility of the Architect to identify the right practices/patterns necessary for creating an appropriate solution. While most of the existing practices look at developing an Architecture that satisfies the requirements identified by the Architect, we propose a context understanding, value proposition, function specification, and value realization based approach for Architecting that is based on the value co-creation system that exists in the system development and usage life cycle.

In this paper, we discuss about the theoretical framework necessary for such an approach.   This theoretical framework is based on insights arrived at by asking six questions that needs to be answered for the system to succeed economically. These six questions are:

a. How does one understand the Context in which Value is created by the System and its usage?

b. What are the benefits of using the system and how to discover, diagnose and understand these benefits?

c. What are the Quality characteristics that results in this benefits? How does one derive these quality characteristics?

d. What are the Functions of the System that will exhibits these qualities? How does one derive these functions?

e. What is the underlying Structure of the system that will host these functions? How does one arrive at this form?

f. What are the Processes that the System should support?  How does one design these processes?

The basis of the framework is the values viewpoint for creating and describing systems.   We illustrate our theoretical framework and approach by describing a management workbench.  

Keywords – Value, Quality, Function, Structure, Process, Context, Context Understanding, Value Proposition, Value Realization, Architecture, Architecting, Value based Approach



Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Anthropocene as Life's State of the Art in Disorder Production: A Sustainability Conundrum

This paper launches on the proposal by Eric D, Schneider and James J. Kay that life is a response to the thermodynamic imperative of dissipating gradients. Adding a twist to the claim of Jeffrey Wicken that “entropic dissipation propels evolutionary structuring,” Schneider and Kay contend that “evolving life represents order emerging from disorder in the service of causing even more disorder.” Drawing on Gregory Bateson’s definition of information, a self-organizing system can dissipate a gradient, a “difference that can make a difference,” more efficiently than helter-skelter falling apart. Examples range from transient physical systems (Bénard Cells, hurricanes, tornadoes) and chemical systems (BZ color flipping clocks) to evolving biological (bacteria, trees, ant colonies, coral reefs, brains), and, it is proposed, human/biotechnological systems (automobiles, coal fired power plants, smartphones, apps) passing the baton of Erwin Schrödinger’s “order from order” means for sustainably remembering and capitalizing on what works. The second law of thermodynamics driven trend of disorder to order to even more disorder continues ever more effectively as state of the art in disorder production in the Anthropocene as autocatalytic, “Matthew Effect,” gradient degrading, human impacts on the biosphere, aided and abetted by advancing technology. Human/biotechnological driven gradient dissolution manifests itself not only in the usual tragedy of the commons victims of industrialized human activity−the sixth extinction of species, the toxic smog in Beijing and New Delhi, the vanishing glaciers, the draining of fresh water aquifers…−it manifests itself in and is linked to us. Robert Rosen observed that a “material system [can] change its own behavior in response to a force, and…that same system can generate forces that change the behavior of other systems.” Under the impress of the escalating force of techno-dependency, our addictive drug, as a system, we, convenience driven, environmentally foggy, smartphone glued to hand, clueless without app, humans are changing our behavior in ways that change the behavior of other systems, biospheric systems not excluded, and, on balance, not for the better. A sustainable future for coupled human/biotechnological systems and the soaring gradient of advancing technology is an oxymoron. The accelerating technical order is producing a deepening skew, a crossing tipping point to out-of-control, global warming scale, disorder of orders. A case-in-point can be seen by extrapolating the increasing fragility of excessive interconnectivity, of climax ecosystems, as Robert Ulanowicz pointed out, to the increasing order of local and global interconnectivity rendering us, individually and collectively, increasingly vulnerable to looming, potentially catastrophic, collapse. What sustainability needs is the going forward stability of an order of orders. Viewing sustainability in the framework of flows and counterflows, excesses and deficits, concentrations and dissipations, of order as potent, transformable organized energy (exergy), a.k.a, power, this paper offers a possible handle on overcoming the formidable barriers to gaining and sustaining a sustainable future, ourselves hopefully included.

Keywords: Anthropocene, autocatalytic; convenience; dissipative structure; disorder; ecosystem; entropy; exergy; fractal; gradient; “Matthew Effect;” order; power law; relational self-similarity; Second Law of Thermodynamics; sustainability; technology 


Moderators
JK

John Kineman

SIG Chair: Relational Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South AfricaAdjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, IndiaPresident (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences ISSS SIG Chair: Relational ScienceDr... Read More →

Speakers
JH

Jeffrey H. Robbins

Adjunct Professor, Rutgers University
ISSS RegularThe title of my paper is "Anthropocene as Life's State of the Art in Disorder Production: A Sustainability Conundrum". The paper extrapolates the claim of by Eric D, Schneider and James J. Kay that life is a response to the thermodynamic imperative of dissipating gradients... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Designing and Evaluating a Conference-Based Critical Social Learning System to Support Systems Thinking in Practice in PhD Research

2Division of Environmental Communication, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Nadarajah.Sriskandarajah@slu.se

3Monash Sustainability Institute, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia 3800

Systems thinking in practice (STiP) education is poorly institutionalised across the Higher Education (HE) sector though needs to contextualise issues and studies and recognise interconnections are much in evidence across many different sectors. This paper reports on the design and implementation of a course-based initiative for PhD students keen to incorporate systems approaches (systems theories and methodologies) into their research practice.  This initiative is of particular relevance to societies like ISSS from the systems and/or cybernetics fields (here after cyber-systemics). The model that has been developed can be used as a ‘wrap-around’ to any conference offering where enhancement of STiP capabilities may be desired or warranted. 

The key elements of the learning system design are (i) a sponsoring host University able to offer credits for training; (ii) a process design based on systemic inquiry; (iii) pre and post-conference time dedicated to the participants framing of the inquiry, valuing of prior experience and group-based learning; (iv) dedicated staff immersed in the different cyber-systemic traditions as well as learning system design and facilitation capability and (v) freedom to use the associated conference itself as a source of input as well as being the subject of critical inquiry..

Students work as a critical social learning system, taking stock of their research trajectories and gaining experience in using systems thinking in practice.  The course was first developed by the authors and some of their peers alongside the International Farming Systems Association’s European symposia in Arhus in 2012 and in Berlin in 2014.  In Arhus the main focus was on making connections among issues of farming, food, rural areas and environment and negotiating boundaries for research in these areas, a process becoming more and more complicated. In Berlin the focus was on working strategically.  Both recognised the need to develop particular skills and abilities e.g. in systemic inquiry.  In Berlin in 2015, at the ISSS conference, the students’ focus is on “Cybersystemic Possibilities for Governing the Anthropocene” and the course design has been extended and adapted to include new elements and to be of relevance to students working in domains beyond agriculture.

This paper will describe the design process of the course and the theories and experiences that underpin it.  The evaluative data available is also reported.  One particular challenge in the learning system design has been which traditions of understanding to build on and which systems theories to draw to students’ attention.  Overviews have been provided as well experiences of using particular theories, techniques and methodologies.  The authors recognise that students face many challenges in identifying and developing appropriate conceptual frameworks and methodologies for their research and try to avoid advocacy of one approach over another.  They encourage students to approach the course critically and to take responsibility for their own learning 

The paper critically reviews a range of influences on learning system design and the effects of the course –both intended and unintended.  It considers how well the course has achieved its intended learning outcomes to date.  Students, presenters and designers perspectives will be included.  Issues of facilitation of learning, learning and teaching styles and experiential learning are addressed.  The latter has particular significance to the theme of the ISSS conference in that lack of congruence between theories espoused and in use (e.g. teachers not ‘walking their talk’) has been a long-running theme in discourses on education for sustainability.  For the authors, presenting this paper at ISSS 2015 provides a valuable opportunity for reflection in as well as on action (after Schön). 


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers
Conference Organisers
avatar for Ray Ison

Ray Ison

Professor of Systems & President IFSR, The Open University/IFSR
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems SciencesProfessor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Framing Risk and Resilience in Urban Futures: Reflections on a Workshop

In his concept of the “Risk Society”, Ulrich Beck remarks that societies and organizations are increasingly concerned with the anticipation and mitigation of risks to their assets, structures and values, and that this preoccupation affects the ways in which societies organize themselves, allocate resources, and structure their imagination of their futures. The proposed paper will use the experiences and of a recent workshop to consider elements of a risk-based approach to envisioning and steering macro-urban futures.

The regional-scale artifact of the Anthropocene that is the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in south-eastern China has become one of the world’s largest concentrations of manufacturing, human settlement and urban development, and is also subject to multiple dimensions of risk in the coming decades, stemming from global-scale changes such as macro-economic and societal shifts, as well as human-influenced climate change and sea level rises.

An intensive one-week workshop was carried out in the context of a Masters-level urbanism program, to consider strategies for the future urban development of the PRD. The premise of the workshop was to take a risk-based approach to structuring ways of thinking about the future of the PRD, and to consider interventions in the future evolution of the urban region in anticipation of these risks.

Six groups of students each adopted a different perspective on the urban region – social, experiential, economic, infrastructural, geographical, or cultural-historical. From their respective perspective, each group considered the value(s) implicit in the assets, relations, actors and patterns in the PRD, and the systems in which these elements are embedded.  Based on this understanding, groups considered the dimensions of risk posed to these systems and relations by the anticipated macro-scale changes.

The goal of this workshop was not to develop urban projects as “solutions” to the issues being addressed, which is far beyond the possible scope of such a workshop, or of any individual institution, but rather to rehearse ways of engaging issues of this magnitude and intractability, and thinking about what could be done in terms of the structure, organization and control of the many urban systems that constitute this region, in order that these systems may go through the learning and adaptation processes necessary to address these issues on an ongoing basis.

Students were encouraged to shift from a problem-solving approach to an adaptation approach to urban evolution, in which they were engaged in anticipating and planning for the need to change, not just to mitigate the negative effects of unavoidable contextual change, but to take the changes as opportunities to reconfigure urban systems in an intentional and beneficial way.

Thus, as a final step, groups were asked to anticipate the policy and education implications of putting into action the adaptive processes they foresee, particularly in terms of “who needs to learn what?” Data presentation, mapping, diagramming and narrative techniques were used throughout the process.

The paper will discuss the philosophical and pedagogical underpinnings of the workshop, describe and illustrate the process through which these ideas were investigated, the themes, insights and issues that emerged in the discussion that developed around the workshop, and offer reflections on what was learned and revealed through this intensive exercise.


Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →

Speakers
TJ

Timothy Jachna

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Systems Research: How Do We Discover What We Need to Know, According to Whom, and for What Purpose?

The idea of the Anthropocene, an era in which human presence and behavior have become the most important factors of change on the Earth, increases long-standing questions about research.  How do we discover what we need to know according to whom and for what purpose? 

At a time in which the most troubling problems are often labeled as systemic (e.g. global financial relationships, environmental concerns, weather-related catastrophes, etc.) there is a need to reevaluate the ways in which we learn about and model the worlds in which we live. Increasingly, thought leaders recognize that critical thinking and positivistic approaches, while valuable, are insufficient to comprehensively and constructively address the most pressing issues of our time. It is not enough to diagnose problems through reductionist approaches. As the urgency of issues related to governing the Anthropocene becomes more prevalent, Systems Research is gaining increased attention across and beyond the Systems Sciences.

Most research is still judged by the tenants of traditional science, which include the isolation of variables in controlled settings, measurement and quantitative analyses of data, and extrapolation of findings to a wider universe (i.e. beyond the studied samples).  Qualitative research methods (including phenomenology, grounded theory, action research, and others) offer alternative approaches for studying humans, but are considered to be less rigorous than quantitative methods in many academic realms.  Methods such as System Dynamics attempt to capture relationships between variables, but are often limited (in this case, primarily to feedback between variables in the form of stocks and flows).

An equally challenging problem is the degree to which knowledge remains defined within long-standing disciplines, with little capacity for transcending those barriers.  At best, each discipline tends to project its own views and knowledge as somewhat universal principles. Most research is still judged by the tenants of traditional science, which include the isolation of variables in controlled settings, measurement and quantitative analyses of data, and extrapolation of findings to a wider universe (i.e. beyond the studied samples).  Qualitative research methods (including phenomenology, grounded theory, action research, and others) offer alternative approaches for studying humans, but are considered to be less rigorous than quantitative methods in many academic realms. 

Governing the Anthropocene requires not only systemic understanding but systemic leadership. Systems Research is part of a portfolio of systemic approaches to help leaders and stakeholders assess, design, develop, implement, and evaluate programs for effective governance of the Anthropocene.

At the IFSR Conversation (2014), an inquiry by a team of systemicists delved into questions related to the need, value, definition, and distinctions of Systems Research. The Systems Research Team’s (SRT) work focused on a compelling question, “What distinguishes Systems Research from other forms of research?” This question propelled the Conversation in multiple directions; however, two threads predominated – those that were divergent (e.g. the broad scope of the Systems Sciences) and those that were convergent (e.g. definition of rigorous research and modeling). As a result, the SRT’s Conversation began to scope out the breadth and depth of this subject. The SRT proposed a framework for examining several questions related to designing, developing, conducting, and evaluating Systems Research. Ultimately, the SRT proposed another compelling question for the future work of the SRT and the Systems community, “What can WE provide to enhance the quality and impact of Systems Research?”

To address this latter question, two additional provocative questions concerning Systems Research have emerged:

What is missing in current research approaches that systems approaches can bridge?

Why does it matter?

This presentation will address these questions by exploring the literature that has addressed the distinguishing dynamics of systemic approaches to research and problem solving. This retrospective will be the foundation for interactive dialogue with ISSS participants attending this session. The intention is to develop a leadership path for Systems Research and its role in more effective governance of the Anthropocene.


Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences.SIG Chair: Action Research (see below for information)Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mary Edson

Mary Edson

President, maredson.s3@gmail.com
Mary Edson is President of the International Federation for Systems Research.  As a Scholar/Practitioner whose major interests are in Complex Adaptive Social Systems, she teaches courses in Executive Leadership, Strategic Project Management, and Talent Management including Diversity... Read More →
avatar for Gary Metcalf

Gary Metcalf

OS faculty, Saybrook University
President, International Federation for Systems ResearchGary S. Metcalf received a PhD in Human Science in 2000 at the Saybrook Graduate School. His doctoral research was conducted under the mentorship of Béla H. Bánáthy, focused on Social Systems Design and Organizational Development.Metcalf... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

A CRM Systemic Model in Mexican SMEs for the Hotel Sector

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

Can We Use Maturana's Theory of Autopoiesis to Enhance Checkland's Soft Systems Methodology?

Amongst the systemic methodologies available to systems practitioners, Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) is one of the most used problem structuring methods. However, some critics have argued that it has serious shortcomings particularly in the initial phases when SSM attempts to structure the situation and when deciding which areas of a problematic situation are deemed to be selected as relevant. Also, issues of power and dominance are left to the SSM practitioner’s own devises; the tools offered, e.g.: rich pictures and the three analyses are only sketched guidelines/models and in some cases not useful and arguable difficult to operationalise. Furthermore, during and after an SSM intervention, during  the process debating changes, when SSM advises to implement ‘culturally desirable’ and ‘systemically feasible’ changes offers the concept of “accommodation” a key and subtle feature of SSM , the researcher is left with a vague idea about as to how to use it, leaving a frustrating gap in the methodology.  

As it has widely reported in the management science and system literature, Soft Systems Methodology operates under what is called the interpretivism paradigm. The main tenets of this paradigm are that reality is complex; it is socially constructed; and a product of continues people’ interactions (interpretivist Ontology); also it assumes that the observer is not independent that is: a point of view (perspective) influences whatever is studied. Under this paradigm, the aim of any intervention is therefore to understand reality through interpretative process in which meaning is attributed (anti-positivist epistemology). No perspective exhausts the richness of reality or distorts the nature of things; each view is unitary not global.

While Checkland approach lies certainly in the interpretivist camp, the philosophical implications of Maturana work are more difficult to frame. Maturana theories of cognition imply certainly an antirealist ontological position. Epistemologically, he claims that the world as we experience (or constitute) is a subject depend and that that objective knowledge (or transcendental knowledge as he labels it) is impossible. For some commentators, his position is inconsistent and rather than confining him into the constructivism, he can be better understood as critical realist. For others his radical claims denying the existence of any independent reality (make him a candidate of radical constructivism. In this paper, and for the purposes of contrasting the two approaches and seeking synergies between them, we will adopt the most widely argument of placing him in the constructivism camp.

The work of Maturana and Varela  on the nature of living, the biological nature of cognition and knowledge have been having a far reaching influence on the systems and various others fields. It has been argued that Maturana’s ideas lean more to a constructivist paradigm.  We argue that SSM popularity and some reportedly shortcoming in its application seems to be a consequence of the interpretivism position, and we proposed to address this by bringing concepts developed around  Maturana’s theory of autopoiesis (ToA) and Biology of Cognition (BoC).

This paper attempts to address SSM limitations and attempts to enhance the above SSM applications, by exploring how two key concepts from Maturana’s ToA and BoC namely: (i) Structured-Determined Systems; and (ii) Organizational Closure might help to overcome the limitations and complement Checkland's SSM process. In this paper, we propose a SSM autopoietic framework in which the above concepts are grafted in the well-known SSM 7-steps. This is a work in progress work and in this paper, we present the framework together with a number of questions to reflect as a way to refine the model before using it in practice. We hope to use the model in a real world situation later on.

Keywords: Autopoiesis; SSM; Biology of Cognition; Accommodation; decision process


Moderators
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences.SIG Chair: Action Research (see below for information)Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on... Read More →

Speakers
AP

Alberto Paucar-Caceres

Manchester Metropolitan University
ISSS Regular


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

Redefining Scientific Objectivity

Since the time of Rene Descartes, the definition within science of what “Objectivity” means has been based on the perspective of a machine. In other words; mindless and lifeless. Since the entailment for any machine to come into being exists outside the machine itself,  it is no surprise that a science based on this kind of thinking has trouble with concepts like “health”. And yet, every living organism that exists has come into being with its own, internal value for what “health” means. That value is always based entirely on another internally derived value that each living organism also has: the definition for “self”. Whatever “self” is defined as being, that’s what “health” will be predicated on.  Therefore, “Health-Of-Self” is what metabolism and repair are constantly involved in maintaining. Metabolism and Repair are the two functional capacities, according to Robert Rosen, that are both necessary and sufficient for life.

Mainstream science has built itself around the paradigm of Physics, extending those concepts and premises into other disciplines with the understandable presumption that if everything in the material world is made up of the same building blocks, then all are related in various ways and the rules will cross the artificial boundaries created by human perception. Unfortunately, what seemed to be representative of “the rules” by which the material world works (when applying them to orbital phenomena and other aspects of non-living systems) turn out to be woefully inadequate-- to the point of being inappropriate-- when we try to extend them to most of the observable phenomena in biology. The notions of function and dysfunction, for example: In medical and veterinary science, we have to contend with the fact that “health” is the object of a practice that cannot even define the term, scientifically. That’s schizophrenic to say the least.  Given the circumstances,  medical science has chosen to mainly focus on defining disease and dysfunction, looking for ways to rectify both without having to address the messy reality that there is no way to understand what “health” is from the perspective of total scientific objectivity, as it currently stands.

Similarly; in the branches of science devoted to studying ecosystems and the biosphere, we find there are further impediments to true understanding caused by this machine-like mindset. Every single living organism has the same self-based perspective with all of its behavior going towards maintaining and enhancing health-of-self. That is an inherently non-objective point of view. How are we to understand what we observe of  living behavior, as well as all the interactions between individual organisms or groups of organisms, without taking such facts into account? And how shall we define “health” for ecosystems? Can an ecosystem actually be “unhealthy”? How and when? According to whose perspective? When we talk about predator/prey relationships being beneficial for ecosystems and even for populations of the prey species, how shall we describe the impact on the health of the individual who is eaten? What if the “predator” is a pathogen like the Ebola virus and the prey is humanity?

The trouble in this situation is that we end up violating critical principles of what science is for by trying to adhere to a standard of objectivity that needs to be amended. It  was generated while observing non-living, purely reactive systems. Applying a methodology designed for studying and describing orbital mechanics to living, Anticipatory Systems turns out to be counter-productive and yet what are the alternatives?
This paper will explore the process of considering what an alternative working definition for “scientific objectivity” should be: one that is not a source of unnecessary impediments to advancing the science of life and living, but still maintains the positive attributes of independence and verifiable knowledge that were intended with the development of the methodology of science as a system of inquiry in the first place. 


Moderators
JK

John Kineman

SIG Chair: Relational Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South AfricaAdjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, IndiaPresident (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences ISSS SIG Chair: Relational ScienceDr... Read More →

ISSS Board & SIG Chairs
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational ScienceJudith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen... Read More →

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

Strategic Planning During the Most Recent Anthropocene

Due to the constantly increasing rate of change faced during the current Anthropocene traditional approaches to strategic planning are no longer capable of producing the desired results. Most of them depend on predicting future trends and events so that organizations can prepare for and take advantage of them. Plans are made, priorities defined and action steps outlined based on the originally identified objectives. The problem is that the length of time for which we are able to accurately predict the future is shrinking rapidly so that by the time we get around to implementing our decisions they are too frequently obsolete. What we need is a new paradigm that makes organizations capable of learning continually from their environment and adapting rapidly. Interactive Planning is such a paradigm. After scanning the environment to discover what currently exists, instead of defining project priorities the second step in Interactive Planning is to redefine or redesign the organization’s function, structure, and key processes in a way that is highly participative, that integrates the organization on all levels, and that encourages continual learning of the entire workforce. A technique frequently used to accomplish this is Idealized Design. In that Interactive Planning is a never ending process it gives organizations a better chance of deal effectively with the Anthropocene.

 


Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

The Display/Pickup Paradigm for Social System Behavior

Public education, a wonderful creation of human society, is currently troubled by a cycle of increasing decline.  Ever-increasing demands leave educators less able to address their own student, school and district issues. So, school quality goes down, for a 19 + 1 = 18 effect.  That is: if school quality is 19, add a new demand (+1), school quality goes down to 18. Then, desperate new policies are mandated every year -– too quickly for schools to keep up.  Over three years, the process looks like 19 + 1 = 18 … 17 … 16.  This poster explains this increasing decline as caused by [I] flawed practice in which the leader or supervisor ‘installs’ the new policy, program and tasks in the supervised.  This install practice is built on [II] flawed and conflicting assumptions. Namely, the flawed assumptions are that agency is in the supervisor, rather than the supervised.  Expert supervisors have observed the errors in this thinking and many have overcorrected for an emerging new paradigm that assumes agency in the supervised, rather than the supervisor.   The result is an either/or debate and conflict.  Clarification of agency, building on Boulding’s Typology, yields [III] corrected theory and improved assumptions.   Namely, cause/agency in learning and behavior is: dual & multiple, infinitely variable, and in everyone – learners and leaders. The result is a new unifying DISPLAY/PICKUP paradigm for education and management.  The supervisor’s role is to be the agent of the DISPLAY of the agenda and subject matter.  The supervised are agents of PICKUP, each at their own rates, for their own purposes.  [IV] Corresponding practices are proposed, with the goal that [V] 19 + 1 = 20 … 21 … 22.

Keywords:social system design; paradigm shift; educational systems design


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below)Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Customer Centric Project Management Engaging the CUSTOMER in Defining Corporate Requirements
Moderators
Speakers
CV

Charles Villanyi Bokor

The CERP Group
ISSS One Day


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Stockholm 2 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Food Production through the Lens of Relational Theory: Tomato Variety 'Bocati' grown in Germany
Moderators
JK

John Kineman

SIG Chair: Relational Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South AfricaAdjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, IndiaPresident (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences ISSS SIG Chair: Relational ScienceDr... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Stockholm 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Method for Promoting ICT Engineering Safety

In this paper, a method is proposed for promoting ICT engineering safety learning from crisis management. The current majority of methodologies for ICT use reductionist approach (i.e. lack of holistic view). Therefore, we need more holistic methodologies to realize system safety, and system safety should include human factors. In particular, ICT engineering arena human factors play a crucial role in promoting ICT system safety. The Tokyo stock exchange was crushed on 1st of November 2005 by an operation error, which had a severe impact on the global. The human factors (operator error, maintenance engineers’ error, etc.) cause severe impact to not only ICT systems but also social systems (nuclear plant systems, transportation systems, etc.). A JR West train derailed and overturned on  25th April 2005 due to driver misconduct caused the loss of 106 passengers’ lives at Kyoto in Japan. The progress of ICT technologies (i.e., cloud, virtual and network technology) inevitably shifts ICT systems into complexity with tightly interacting domains. This trend places the human factors above other elements to promote safety more than ever. The emergent property interacting between ICT and human conduct should be dealt with in order to promote system safety. Crisis management treats holistic property over partial component. We introduce a human error framework to promote a holistic view to manage system failures. An application example of ICT human error exhibits the effectiveness of this methodology. 

Key words: Risk management; Crisis management; Normal accident theory (NAT); High Reliability Organization (HRO); Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

 



Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Open
Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Elk Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

The Design of Inquiry for Business Growth

This paper is concerned with the design of ‘business growth programmes’, i.e. specifically designed learning programmes with explicitly stated goals of promoting and impacting on business growth. This paper is based on research into the design considerations of growth programmes in 3 European countries. It is the result of a two year European research study funded from the European Commission.  With this as context, using Systems Thinking we re-theorise the role of design itself as it applies to business growth programmes. This is achieved by re-tracing some of the most fundamental systems ideas back to Kant’s critique of practical reason. The paper draws out several implications, (i) to demonstrate the application of a new set of principles which are designed to simultaneously help to develop and evaluate future business growth programmes; (ii) these principles also can help explain the tendency towards sub-optimal growth programmes in current practice; and (iii) to re-consider the policy priorities and assumptions for supporting business growth programmes in future.

Keywords: Systems Thinking, Methodology, Systemic, Business Growth, Learning Programmes.

 


Moderators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
avatar for Prof. Liss C. Werner

Prof. Liss C. Werner

Principal, Architect, Tactile Architecture - office für Systemarchitektur
Prof. Liss C. Werner is a registered architect based in Berlin and founder of Tactile Architecture – Office for SystemArchitektur.  She is adj. assoc. Professor at Taylor’s University near Kuala Lumpur, Dr. phil. [abd] and  George N. Pauly, Jr. Fellow 2012/13, visiting professor... Read More →

Speakers
JP

John Paul Kawalek

Head of Division of Management, University of Sheffield
ISSS Two Day


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Copenhagen 1 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Towards a Systemic Evaluation for Graduate Academic Programs in Mexico

The level of development reached by a country is directly related to the quality level of the higher education offered in it’s institutions and universities, particularly the quality of the doctorate programs in which scientific research and innovation are promoted and can be demonstrated by reviewing the papers published in international journals and the patents registered which eventually become goods or services that allow more welfare for the population.

In Mexico, the National Council for Science and Technology is responsible of guarantee the quality of graduate programs by evaluating them periodically, but the institutions are in the process of acquiring abilities to evaluate graduate educational system in Mexico.

Papers reviewed so far, focus mainly in evaluation methodologies that were design for industrial processes in which quality is very well defined according to the features of the inputs that go through a standard process and produces a standard output. None of the papers reviewed mention what are the attributes of quality in academic evaluation which makes of this task a complicated and incomplete one.

An evaluation methodology should be designed from a systemic approach with a anthropocentric perspective since these are socio-technical systems in which human interaction is a very important element. As important as a methodology for academic evaluation, is to find a concept to include the systemic attributes required to consider an academic program pertinent from an anthropocentric perspective.

 


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
 
Wednesday, August 5
 

08:45 CEST

Welcome and Housekeeping
Speakers
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →


Wednesday August 5, 2015 08:45 - 09:00 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany
 
Friday, August 7
 

08:45 CEST

Welcome and Housekeeping
Speakers
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

SIG Chair: Organizational Transformation and Social Change, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic... Read More →


Friday August 7, 2015 08:45 - 09:00 CEST
Aurora 2 & 3 Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany