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SIG Session [clear filter]
Tuesday, August 4
 

16:00 CEST

Initiatory Rites of Passage as Leverage Points: A Comparative Investigation of Symbolic Meaning in the Japanese School System

This paper will concern itself with rites of passage, in particular focusing on those embedded in various schooling and educational systems and used to signify initiation.  It will investigate how, as educational elements, such rites exist, are practiced, and remain significant in an increasingly anthropocentric world.  The paper will begin by discussing a particular case: that of Japan’s entrance examination system.  It will show how this system once served as an initiatory rite of passage, playing an important role in the mental and emotional health of individuals as well as in the functioning of the society at large.  The paper with then move into an investigation of contemporary Japan exploring how, over the last two decades, entrance examinations have fallen ever further into disuse.  This trend will then be shown to correlate with the development of overly dependent, asocial, and/or self-destructive behavioural trends among young Japanese.  The possible connections between Japan’s disappearing rite of passage and its growing troubles with its younger generations will be explored and interpretations based on a framework rooted in anthropology and existential psychology will be offered.   In order to develop a richer and more complex understanding of the trends in question, the paper will then compare Japan to both Korea and the United States applying the same framework to further explore how initiatory rites of passage can act as leverage points in the production of social trends. It will conclude by inquiring as to whether an active approach to the design and implementation of initiatory rites of passage would be an ethical and advisable strategy for reforming education.

 


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ian Roth

Ian Roth

iroth@saybrook.edu,  
Educational design; systems ethics; Cross-cultural learning and communication


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:00 - 16:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

16:30 CEST

Designing and Evaluating a Conference-Based Critical Social Learning System to Support Systems Thinking in Practice in PhD Research

2Division of Environmental Communication, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Nadarajah.Sriskandarajah@slu.se

3Monash Sustainability Institute, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia 3800

Systems thinking in practice (STiP) education is poorly institutionalised across the Higher Education (HE) sector though needs to contextualise issues and studies and recognise interconnections are much in evidence across many different sectors. This paper reports on the design and implementation of a course-based initiative for PhD students keen to incorporate systems approaches (systems theories and methodologies) into their research practice.  This initiative is of particular relevance to societies like ISSS from the systems and/or cybernetics fields (here after cyber-systemics). The model that has been developed can be used as a ‘wrap-around’ to any conference offering where enhancement of STiP capabilities may be desired or warranted. 

The key elements of the learning system design are (i) a sponsoring host University able to offer credits for training; (ii) a process design based on systemic inquiry; (iii) pre and post-conference time dedicated to the participants framing of the inquiry, valuing of prior experience and group-based learning; (iv) dedicated staff immersed in the different cyber-systemic traditions as well as learning system design and facilitation capability and (v) freedom to use the associated conference itself as a source of input as well as being the subject of critical inquiry..

Students work as a critical social learning system, taking stock of their research trajectories and gaining experience in using systems thinking in practice.  The course was first developed by the authors and some of their peers alongside the International Farming Systems Association’s European symposia in Arhus in 2012 and in Berlin in 2014.  In Arhus the main focus was on making connections among issues of farming, food, rural areas and environment and negotiating boundaries for research in these areas, a process becoming more and more complicated. In Berlin the focus was on working strategically.  Both recognised the need to develop particular skills and abilities e.g. in systemic inquiry.  In Berlin in 2015, at the ISSS conference, the students’ focus is on “Cybersystemic Possibilities for Governing the Anthropocene” and the course design has been extended and adapted to include new elements and to be of relevance to students working in domains beyond agriculture.

This paper will describe the design process of the course and the theories and experiences that underpin it.  The evaluative data available is also reported.  One particular challenge in the learning system design has been which traditions of understanding to build on and which systems theories to draw to students’ attention.  Overviews have been provided as well experiences of using particular theories, techniques and methodologies.  The authors recognise that students face many challenges in identifying and developing appropriate conceptual frameworks and methodologies for their research and try to avoid advocacy of one approach over another.  They encourage students to approach the course critically and to take responsibility for their own learning 

The paper critically reviews a range of influences on learning system design and the effects of the course –both intended and unintended.  It considers how well the course has achieved its intended learning outcomes to date.  Students, presenters and designers perspectives will be included.  Issues of facilitation of learning, learning and teaching styles and experiential learning are addressed.  The latter has particular significance to the theme of the ISSS conference in that lack of congruence between theories espoused and in use (e.g. teachers not ‘walking their talk’) has been a long-running theme in discourses on education for sustainability.  For the authors, presenting this paper at ISSS 2015 provides a valuable opportunity for reflection in as well as on action (after Schön). 


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers
Conference Organisers
avatar for Ray Ison

Ray Ison

Professor of Systems & President IFSR, The Open University/IFSR
President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems SciencesProfessor, Systems for Sustainability at the Monash Sustainability Institute (MSI), and Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 16:30 - 17:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:00 CEST

The Display/Pickup Paradigm for Social System Behavior

Public education, a wonderful creation of human society, is currently troubled by a cycle of increasing decline.  Ever-increasing demands leave educators less able to address their own student, school and district issues. So, school quality goes down, for a 19 + 1 = 18 effect.  That is: if school quality is 19, add a new demand (+1), school quality goes down to 18. Then, desperate new policies are mandated every year -– too quickly for schools to keep up.  Over three years, the process looks like 19 + 1 = 18 … 17 … 16.  This poster explains this increasing decline as caused by [I] flawed practice in which the leader or supervisor ‘installs’ the new policy, program and tasks in the supervised.  This install practice is built on [II] flawed and conflicting assumptions. Namely, the flawed assumptions are that agency is in the supervisor, rather than the supervised.  Expert supervisors have observed the errors in this thinking and many have overcorrected for an emerging new paradigm that assumes agency in the supervised, rather than the supervisor.   The result is an either/or debate and conflict.  Clarification of agency, building on Boulding’s Typology, yields [III] corrected theory and improved assumptions.   Namely, cause/agency in learning and behavior is: dual & multiple, infinitely variable, and in everyone – learners and leaders. The result is a new unifying DISPLAY/PICKUP paradigm for education and management.  The supervisor’s role is to be the agent of the DISPLAY of the agenda and subject matter.  The supervised are agents of PICKUP, each at their own rates, for their own purposes.  [IV] Corresponding practices are proposed, with the goal that [V] 19 + 1 = 20 … 21 … 22.

Keywords:social system design; paradigm shift; educational systems design


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below)Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social... Read More →


Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:00 - 17:30 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany

17:30 CEST

Towards a Systemic Evaluation for Graduate Academic Programs in Mexico

The level of development reached by a country is directly related to the quality level of the higher education offered in it’s institutions and universities, particularly the quality of the doctorate programs in which scientific research and innovation are promoted and can be demonstrated by reviewing the papers published in international journals and the patents registered which eventually become goods or services that allow more welfare for the population.

In Mexico, the National Council for Science and Technology is responsible of guarantee the quality of graduate programs by evaluating them periodically, but the institutions are in the process of acquiring abilities to evaluate graduate educational system in Mexico.

Papers reviewed so far, focus mainly in evaluation methodologies that were design for industrial processes in which quality is very well defined according to the features of the inputs that go through a standard process and produces a standard output. None of the papers reviewed mention what are the attributes of quality in academic evaluation which makes of this task a complicated and incomplete one.

An evaluation methodology should be designed from a systemic approach with a anthropocentric perspective since these are socio-technical systems in which human interaction is a very important element. As important as a methodology for academic evaluation, is to find a concept to include the systemic attributes required to consider an academic program pertinent from an anthropocentric perspective.

 


Moderators
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →

Speakers

Tuesday August 4, 2015 17:30 - 18:00 CEST
Reindeer Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz, Gabriele-Tergit-Promenade 19, 10963 Berlin, Germany